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CMOS cell sensors for point-of-care diagnostics.

Adiguzel Y, Kulah H - Sensors (Basel) (2012)

Bottom Line: The burden of health-care related services in a global era with continuously increasing population and inefficient dissipation of the resources requires effective solutions.CMOS-based products can enable clinical tests in a fast, simple, safe, and reliable manner, with improved sensitivities.Portability due to diminished sensor dimensions and compactness of the test set-ups, along with low sample and power consumption, is another vital feature.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: METU-MEMS Research and Application Center, Middle East Technical University, Ankara 06800, Turkey. yekbun@metu.edu.tr

ABSTRACT
The burden of health-care related services in a global era with continuously increasing population and inefficient dissipation of the resources requires effective solutions. From this perspective, point-of-care diagnostics is a demanded field in clinics. It is also necessary both for prompt diagnosis and for providing health services evenly throughout the population, including the rural districts. The requirements can only be fulfilled by technologies whose productivity has already been proven, such as complementary metal-oxide-semiconductors (CMOS). CMOS-based products can enable clinical tests in a fast, simple, safe, and reliable manner, with improved sensitivities. Portability due to diminished sensor dimensions and compactness of the test set-ups, along with low sample and power consumption, is another vital feature. CMOS-based sensors for cell studies have the potential to become essential counterparts of point-of-care diagnostics technologies. Hence, this review attempts to inform on the sensors fabricated with CMOS technology for point-of-care diagnostic studies, with a focus on CMOS image sensors and capacitance sensors for cell studies.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Concept of the optical and potential dual image CMOS sensor [78]. The actual sensor consisted of a 176 × 144 pixel array with 7.5 × 7.5 μm pixel sizes, and 88 columns were spared for optical-sensing and the rest 88 for potential-sensing [78]. Adapted with the permission of Elsevier.
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f5-sensors-12-10042: Concept of the optical and potential dual image CMOS sensor [78]. The actual sensor consisted of a 176 × 144 pixel array with 7.5 × 7.5 μm pixel sizes, and 88 columns were spared for optical-sensing and the rest 88 for potential-sensing [78]. Adapted with the permission of Elsevier.

Mentions: While the imaging concept with CMOS sensors was being improved with studies such as holographic-imaging, multiplicity of functions were attempted to be combined on a single chip. Accordingly, 2D optical and potential dual imaging CMOS sensor was demonstrated for bioscientific applications (Figure 5). The profile of a potential spot having a diameter of less than 50 μm was observed [78]. By choosing an appropriate operating sequence and off-chip configuration, the sensor was capable of operating in either a wide-range potential imaging mode (>5 V) or a high-resolution potential imaging mode (1.6 mV) [78]. The sensor was described and demonstrated to have applications including on-chip optical and potential neural imaging. On-chip biomolecular sensing with fluorescence and potential dual measurement schemes was specifically implemented in sensing deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) hybridization [78]. The target application of neural imaging was on-chip imaging of the field potentials of a neural system.


CMOS cell sensors for point-of-care diagnostics.

Adiguzel Y, Kulah H - Sensors (Basel) (2012)

Concept of the optical and potential dual image CMOS sensor [78]. The actual sensor consisted of a 176 × 144 pixel array with 7.5 × 7.5 μm pixel sizes, and 88 columns were spared for optical-sensing and the rest 88 for potential-sensing [78]. Adapted with the permission of Elsevier.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3472815&req=5

f5-sensors-12-10042: Concept of the optical and potential dual image CMOS sensor [78]. The actual sensor consisted of a 176 × 144 pixel array with 7.5 × 7.5 μm pixel sizes, and 88 columns were spared for optical-sensing and the rest 88 for potential-sensing [78]. Adapted with the permission of Elsevier.
Mentions: While the imaging concept with CMOS sensors was being improved with studies such as holographic-imaging, multiplicity of functions were attempted to be combined on a single chip. Accordingly, 2D optical and potential dual imaging CMOS sensor was demonstrated for bioscientific applications (Figure 5). The profile of a potential spot having a diameter of less than 50 μm was observed [78]. By choosing an appropriate operating sequence and off-chip configuration, the sensor was capable of operating in either a wide-range potential imaging mode (>5 V) or a high-resolution potential imaging mode (1.6 mV) [78]. The sensor was described and demonstrated to have applications including on-chip optical and potential neural imaging. On-chip biomolecular sensing with fluorescence and potential dual measurement schemes was specifically implemented in sensing deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) hybridization [78]. The target application of neural imaging was on-chip imaging of the field potentials of a neural system.

Bottom Line: The burden of health-care related services in a global era with continuously increasing population and inefficient dissipation of the resources requires effective solutions.CMOS-based products can enable clinical tests in a fast, simple, safe, and reliable manner, with improved sensitivities.Portability due to diminished sensor dimensions and compactness of the test set-ups, along with low sample and power consumption, is another vital feature.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: METU-MEMS Research and Application Center, Middle East Technical University, Ankara 06800, Turkey. yekbun@metu.edu.tr

ABSTRACT
The burden of health-care related services in a global era with continuously increasing population and inefficient dissipation of the resources requires effective solutions. From this perspective, point-of-care diagnostics is a demanded field in clinics. It is also necessary both for prompt diagnosis and for providing health services evenly throughout the population, including the rural districts. The requirements can only be fulfilled by technologies whose productivity has already been proven, such as complementary metal-oxide-semiconductors (CMOS). CMOS-based products can enable clinical tests in a fast, simple, safe, and reliable manner, with improved sensitivities. Portability due to diminished sensor dimensions and compactness of the test set-ups, along with low sample and power consumption, is another vital feature. CMOS-based sensors for cell studies have the potential to become essential counterparts of point-of-care diagnostics technologies. Hence, this review attempts to inform on the sensors fabricated with CMOS technology for point-of-care diagnostic studies, with a focus on CMOS image sensors and capacitance sensors for cell studies.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus