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CMOS cell sensors for point-of-care diagnostics.

Adiguzel Y, Kulah H - Sensors (Basel) (2012)

Bottom Line: The burden of health-care related services in a global era with continuously increasing population and inefficient dissipation of the resources requires effective solutions.CMOS-based products can enable clinical tests in a fast, simple, safe, and reliable manner, with improved sensitivities.Portability due to diminished sensor dimensions and compactness of the test set-ups, along with low sample and power consumption, is another vital feature.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: METU-MEMS Research and Application Center, Middle East Technical University, Ankara 06800, Turkey. yekbun@metu.edu.tr

ABSTRACT
The burden of health-care related services in a global era with continuously increasing population and inefficient dissipation of the resources requires effective solutions. From this perspective, point-of-care diagnostics is a demanded field in clinics. It is also necessary both for prompt diagnosis and for providing health services evenly throughout the population, including the rural districts. The requirements can only be fulfilled by technologies whose productivity has already been proven, such as complementary metal-oxide-semiconductors (CMOS). CMOS-based products can enable clinical tests in a fast, simple, safe, and reliable manner, with improved sensitivities. Portability due to diminished sensor dimensions and compactness of the test set-ups, along with low sample and power consumption, is another vital feature. CMOS-based sensors for cell studies have the potential to become essential counterparts of point-of-care diagnostics technologies. Hence, this review attempts to inform on the sensors fabricated with CMOS technology for point-of-care diagnostic studies, with a focus on CMOS image sensors and capacitance sensors for cell studies.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

The LUCAS custom interface is shown [76]. Reproduced with the permission of Journal of Visualized Experiments.
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f3-sensors-12-10042: The LUCAS custom interface is shown [76]. Reproduced with the permission of Journal of Visualized Experiments.

Mentions: A significant progress in the field of CMOS cell imaging for point-of-care diagnostics is named LUCAS, in short. This approach has the potential to bring the point-of-care diagnostics into reality, not only at hospitals but at under-developed districts and at homes, through evolving individual cell phones into blood analysis tools. The imaging method was realized by projecting the diffraction patterns of cells directly onto 2D photosensors such as CMOS sensor [37,75]. The light source is not required to be a laser and therefore even a simple light emitting diode (LED) can be used for illumination [76]. CMOS-based imaging platform records the shadows such as lensless digital holograms [76]. Then, automated digital processing with custom-developed LUCAS decision software (Figure 3) determines the type, count, and relative positions of cells within the heterogeneous cell population in solution (Figure 4). Its advantage over lens-based microscopy is the large field-of-view and its being capable of operation without scanning stages and optical components such as lenses. Yet, the resolution is at the cell-size level, so single virus particles cannot be directly visualized.


CMOS cell sensors for point-of-care diagnostics.

Adiguzel Y, Kulah H - Sensors (Basel) (2012)

The LUCAS custom interface is shown [76]. Reproduced with the permission of Journal of Visualized Experiments.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3472815&req=5

f3-sensors-12-10042: The LUCAS custom interface is shown [76]. Reproduced with the permission of Journal of Visualized Experiments.
Mentions: A significant progress in the field of CMOS cell imaging for point-of-care diagnostics is named LUCAS, in short. This approach has the potential to bring the point-of-care diagnostics into reality, not only at hospitals but at under-developed districts and at homes, through evolving individual cell phones into blood analysis tools. The imaging method was realized by projecting the diffraction patterns of cells directly onto 2D photosensors such as CMOS sensor [37,75]. The light source is not required to be a laser and therefore even a simple light emitting diode (LED) can be used for illumination [76]. CMOS-based imaging platform records the shadows such as lensless digital holograms [76]. Then, automated digital processing with custom-developed LUCAS decision software (Figure 3) determines the type, count, and relative positions of cells within the heterogeneous cell population in solution (Figure 4). Its advantage over lens-based microscopy is the large field-of-view and its being capable of operation without scanning stages and optical components such as lenses. Yet, the resolution is at the cell-size level, so single virus particles cannot be directly visualized.

Bottom Line: The burden of health-care related services in a global era with continuously increasing population and inefficient dissipation of the resources requires effective solutions.CMOS-based products can enable clinical tests in a fast, simple, safe, and reliable manner, with improved sensitivities.Portability due to diminished sensor dimensions and compactness of the test set-ups, along with low sample and power consumption, is another vital feature.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: METU-MEMS Research and Application Center, Middle East Technical University, Ankara 06800, Turkey. yekbun@metu.edu.tr

ABSTRACT
The burden of health-care related services in a global era with continuously increasing population and inefficient dissipation of the resources requires effective solutions. From this perspective, point-of-care diagnostics is a demanded field in clinics. It is also necessary both for prompt diagnosis and for providing health services evenly throughout the population, including the rural districts. The requirements can only be fulfilled by technologies whose productivity has already been proven, such as complementary metal-oxide-semiconductors (CMOS). CMOS-based products can enable clinical tests in a fast, simple, safe, and reliable manner, with improved sensitivities. Portability due to diminished sensor dimensions and compactness of the test set-ups, along with low sample and power consumption, is another vital feature. CMOS-based sensors for cell studies have the potential to become essential counterparts of point-of-care diagnostics technologies. Hence, this review attempts to inform on the sensors fabricated with CMOS technology for point-of-care diagnostic studies, with a focus on CMOS image sensors and capacitance sensors for cell studies.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus