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CMOS cell sensors for point-of-care diagnostics.

Adiguzel Y, Kulah H - Sensors (Basel) (2012)

Bottom Line: The burden of health-care related services in a global era with continuously increasing population and inefficient dissipation of the resources requires effective solutions.CMOS-based products can enable clinical tests in a fast, simple, safe, and reliable manner, with improved sensitivities.Portability due to diminished sensor dimensions and compactness of the test set-ups, along with low sample and power consumption, is another vital feature.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: METU-MEMS Research and Application Center, Middle East Technical University, Ankara 06800, Turkey. yekbun@metu.edu.tr

ABSTRACT
The burden of health-care related services in a global era with continuously increasing population and inefficient dissipation of the resources requires effective solutions. From this perspective, point-of-care diagnostics is a demanded field in clinics. It is also necessary both for prompt diagnosis and for providing health services evenly throughout the population, including the rural districts. The requirements can only be fulfilled by technologies whose productivity has already been proven, such as complementary metal-oxide-semiconductors (CMOS). CMOS-based products can enable clinical tests in a fast, simple, safe, and reliable manner, with improved sensitivities. Portability due to diminished sensor dimensions and compactness of the test set-ups, along with low sample and power consumption, is another vital feature. CMOS-based sensors for cell studies have the potential to become essential counterparts of point-of-care diagnostics technologies. Hence, this review attempts to inform on the sensors fabricated with CMOS technology for point-of-care diagnostic studies, with a focus on CMOS image sensors and capacitance sensors for cell studies.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Ionic cloud surrounding the surface-anchored cell over the sensing electrode polarizes (a) and leads to the formation of capacitive behavior of the cell, which is contributing to various elements of the sensed capacitance network (b) [60]; (b) illustrates the model of sensed capacitance during the adhesion and post-adhesion phase of the interaction process between cell and substrate [64]. Cox stands for passivation layer capacitance, Ccell stands for cell layer capacitance, Cf stands for fringe parasitic capacitance, Cint stands for interfacial capacitance, and Cgm stands for growth medium capacitance [60]. Reproduced with the permission of Elsevier.
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f1-sensors-12-10042: Ionic cloud surrounding the surface-anchored cell over the sensing electrode polarizes (a) and leads to the formation of capacitive behavior of the cell, which is contributing to various elements of the sensed capacitance network (b) [60]; (b) illustrates the model of sensed capacitance during the adhesion and post-adhesion phase of the interaction process between cell and substrate [64]. Cox stands for passivation layer capacitance, Ccell stands for cell layer capacitance, Cf stands for fringe parasitic capacitance, Cint stands for interfacial capacitance, and Cgm stands for growth medium capacitance [60]. Reproduced with the permission of Elsevier.

Mentions: The capacitance sensor uses the principle of charge sharing and translates sensed capacitance values to output voltages [64]. As a result, the measured capacitance depends on a variety of factors related to the cell, growth medium, and supporting substrate [Figure 1(b)]. Under low frequency electric fields, ionic cloud surrounding the insulating cell polarizes [Figure 1(a)], and the resulting electric dipoles lead to the formation of capacitive behavior of the cell [64]. Capacitance of healthy cells is higher and they adhere stronger to the surface, due to the capacitive coupling between the cells and the underlying electrodes.


CMOS cell sensors for point-of-care diagnostics.

Adiguzel Y, Kulah H - Sensors (Basel) (2012)

Ionic cloud surrounding the surface-anchored cell over the sensing electrode polarizes (a) and leads to the formation of capacitive behavior of the cell, which is contributing to various elements of the sensed capacitance network (b) [60]; (b) illustrates the model of sensed capacitance during the adhesion and post-adhesion phase of the interaction process between cell and substrate [64]. Cox stands for passivation layer capacitance, Ccell stands for cell layer capacitance, Cf stands for fringe parasitic capacitance, Cint stands for interfacial capacitance, and Cgm stands for growth medium capacitance [60]. Reproduced with the permission of Elsevier.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3472815&req=5

f1-sensors-12-10042: Ionic cloud surrounding the surface-anchored cell over the sensing electrode polarizes (a) and leads to the formation of capacitive behavior of the cell, which is contributing to various elements of the sensed capacitance network (b) [60]; (b) illustrates the model of sensed capacitance during the adhesion and post-adhesion phase of the interaction process between cell and substrate [64]. Cox stands for passivation layer capacitance, Ccell stands for cell layer capacitance, Cf stands for fringe parasitic capacitance, Cint stands for interfacial capacitance, and Cgm stands for growth medium capacitance [60]. Reproduced with the permission of Elsevier.
Mentions: The capacitance sensor uses the principle of charge sharing and translates sensed capacitance values to output voltages [64]. As a result, the measured capacitance depends on a variety of factors related to the cell, growth medium, and supporting substrate [Figure 1(b)]. Under low frequency electric fields, ionic cloud surrounding the insulating cell polarizes [Figure 1(a)], and the resulting electric dipoles lead to the formation of capacitive behavior of the cell [64]. Capacitance of healthy cells is higher and they adhere stronger to the surface, due to the capacitive coupling between the cells and the underlying electrodes.

Bottom Line: The burden of health-care related services in a global era with continuously increasing population and inefficient dissipation of the resources requires effective solutions.CMOS-based products can enable clinical tests in a fast, simple, safe, and reliable manner, with improved sensitivities.Portability due to diminished sensor dimensions and compactness of the test set-ups, along with low sample and power consumption, is another vital feature.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: METU-MEMS Research and Application Center, Middle East Technical University, Ankara 06800, Turkey. yekbun@metu.edu.tr

ABSTRACT
The burden of health-care related services in a global era with continuously increasing population and inefficient dissipation of the resources requires effective solutions. From this perspective, point-of-care diagnostics is a demanded field in clinics. It is also necessary both for prompt diagnosis and for providing health services evenly throughout the population, including the rural districts. The requirements can only be fulfilled by technologies whose productivity has already been proven, such as complementary metal-oxide-semiconductors (CMOS). CMOS-based products can enable clinical tests in a fast, simple, safe, and reliable manner, with improved sensitivities. Portability due to diminished sensor dimensions and compactness of the test set-ups, along with low sample and power consumption, is another vital feature. CMOS-based sensors for cell studies have the potential to become essential counterparts of point-of-care diagnostics technologies. Hence, this review attempts to inform on the sensors fabricated with CMOS technology for point-of-care diagnostic studies, with a focus on CMOS image sensors and capacitance sensors for cell studies.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus