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Fabrication of high sensitivity carbon microcoil pressure sensors.

Su CC, Li CH, Chang NK, Gao F, Chang SH - Sensors (Basel) (2012)

Bottom Line: This work demonstrates a highly sensitive pressure sensor that was fabricated using carbon microcoils (CMCs) and polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS).The pressure sensor has a sandwiched structure, in which the as-grown CMCs were inserted between two PDMS layers.The pressure sensor exhibits piezo-resistivity changes in response to mechanical loading using a load cell system.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Mechanical Engineering, National Taiwan University, Taipei 10617, Taiwan. r92522629@ntu.edu.tw

ABSTRACT
This work demonstrates a highly sensitive pressure sensor that was fabricated using carbon microcoils (CMCs) and polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS). CMCs were grown by chemical vapor deposition using various ratios of Fe-Sn catalytic solution. The pressure sensor has a sandwiched structure, in which the as-grown CMCs were inserted between two PDMS layers. The pressure sensor exhibits piezo-resistivity changes in response to mechanical loading using a load cell system. The yields of the growth of CMCs at a catalyst proportion of Fe:Sn = 95:5 reach 95%. Experimental results show that the sensor achieves a high sensitivity of 0.93%/kPa from the CMC yield of 95%. The sensitivity of the pressure sensor increases with increasing yield of CMCs. The demonstrated pressure sensor shows the advantage of high sensitivity and is suitable for mass production.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Experimental setup for measuring the pressure sensor of CMCs.
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f4-sensors-12-10034: Experimental setup for measuring the pressure sensor of CMCs.

Mentions: Figure 4 is a schematic of the measurement setup for characterizing the pressure sensor of CMCs. The electrodes of Ag glue at both ends of the sample were connected to a multimeter for measurement of resistance. The corresponding resistivity of the CMCs could be evaluated by the measured resistance values under repeatable measurements (six times). The measured results of resistivity vs. applied pressure (0∼14 kPa) for the CMC pressure sensor with different yields of CMC growth are shown in Figure 5. Each point in the figure is the average value of one sample under 20 different applied pressures. The resistances increased with increases in the applied force from 3 to 14 kPa. The CMCs had higher resistance, suggesting that the helical CMCs affect the current transfer. Notably, the resistances decreased with increases in the applied force from 0 to 3 kPa. This result means that the CMCs/CNFs were not tightly connected, and some empty space exists between them. The CMCs/CNFs became dense and tight with increases in the applied force, resulting in increases in the conducting area and decreases in the electrical resistance. With continuous increases in the applied force from 3 to 14 kPa, the density of CMCs/CNFs mats did not increase, leading to an increase in the resistance. Interestingly, it can be seen that the resistance linearly increases with increasing applied force, as shown in Figure 5(d); i.e., the 3D structure of CMCs can apparently cause an increase in the resistance with a larger applied force. In addition, the distribution of as-grown carbon materials affected the contact resistance of the loading pressure. The resistance of the catalyst ratio of Fe-Sn=80:20 is on the order of mega-ohms. The results showed that the non-uniform as-grown CNFs of the two dimensional materials lead to large contact resistance after transferring on PDMS.


Fabrication of high sensitivity carbon microcoil pressure sensors.

Su CC, Li CH, Chang NK, Gao F, Chang SH - Sensors (Basel) (2012)

Experimental setup for measuring the pressure sensor of CMCs.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3472814&req=5

f4-sensors-12-10034: Experimental setup for measuring the pressure sensor of CMCs.
Mentions: Figure 4 is a schematic of the measurement setup for characterizing the pressure sensor of CMCs. The electrodes of Ag glue at both ends of the sample were connected to a multimeter for measurement of resistance. The corresponding resistivity of the CMCs could be evaluated by the measured resistance values under repeatable measurements (six times). The measured results of resistivity vs. applied pressure (0∼14 kPa) for the CMC pressure sensor with different yields of CMC growth are shown in Figure 5. Each point in the figure is the average value of one sample under 20 different applied pressures. The resistances increased with increases in the applied force from 3 to 14 kPa. The CMCs had higher resistance, suggesting that the helical CMCs affect the current transfer. Notably, the resistances decreased with increases in the applied force from 0 to 3 kPa. This result means that the CMCs/CNFs were not tightly connected, and some empty space exists between them. The CMCs/CNFs became dense and tight with increases in the applied force, resulting in increases in the conducting area and decreases in the electrical resistance. With continuous increases in the applied force from 3 to 14 kPa, the density of CMCs/CNFs mats did not increase, leading to an increase in the resistance. Interestingly, it can be seen that the resistance linearly increases with increasing applied force, as shown in Figure 5(d); i.e., the 3D structure of CMCs can apparently cause an increase in the resistance with a larger applied force. In addition, the distribution of as-grown carbon materials affected the contact resistance of the loading pressure. The resistance of the catalyst ratio of Fe-Sn=80:20 is on the order of mega-ohms. The results showed that the non-uniform as-grown CNFs of the two dimensional materials lead to large contact resistance after transferring on PDMS.

Bottom Line: This work demonstrates a highly sensitive pressure sensor that was fabricated using carbon microcoils (CMCs) and polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS).The pressure sensor has a sandwiched structure, in which the as-grown CMCs were inserted between two PDMS layers.The pressure sensor exhibits piezo-resistivity changes in response to mechanical loading using a load cell system.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Mechanical Engineering, National Taiwan University, Taipei 10617, Taiwan. r92522629@ntu.edu.tw

ABSTRACT
This work demonstrates a highly sensitive pressure sensor that was fabricated using carbon microcoils (CMCs) and polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS). CMCs were grown by chemical vapor deposition using various ratios of Fe-Sn catalytic solution. The pressure sensor has a sandwiched structure, in which the as-grown CMCs were inserted between two PDMS layers. The pressure sensor exhibits piezo-resistivity changes in response to mechanical loading using a load cell system. The yields of the growth of CMCs at a catalyst proportion of Fe:Sn = 95:5 reach 95%. Experimental results show that the sensor achieves a high sensitivity of 0.93%/kPa from the CMC yield of 95%. The sensitivity of the pressure sensor increases with increasing yield of CMCs. The demonstrated pressure sensor shows the advantage of high sensitivity and is suitable for mass production.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus