Limits...
A wireless interface for replacing the cables in bridge-sensor applications.

Pavlin M, Novak F - Sensors (Basel) (2012)

Bottom Line: In this approach, the concept of reciprocal topology is employed, where the transmitter side acquires signals with its own transfer function and the receiver side reconstructs them with the transfer function reciprocal to the transmitter transfer function.The performance was evaluated with a dedicated data-acquisition system and finally, the test results were analyzed.The two different sets of results indicated the high level of amplitude and the temporal accuracy of the wirelessly transferred sensor signals.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: In.Medica d.o.o., Levicnikova 34, 8310 Sentjernej, Slovenia. marko.pavlin@inmedica.si

ABSTRACT
This paper presents a solution in which a wireless interface is employed to replace the cables in bridge-sensor measurement applications. The most noticeable feature of the presented approach is the fact that the wireless interface simply replaces the cables without any additional hardware modification to the existing system. In this approach, the concept of reciprocal topology is employed, where the transmitter side acquires signals with its own transfer function and the receiver side reconstructs them with the transfer function reciprocal to the transmitter transfer function. In this paper the principle of data acquisition and reconstruction is described together with the implementation details of the signal transfer from the sensor to the signal-monitoring equipment. The wireless data communication was investigated and proprietary data-reduction methods were developed. The proposed methods and algorithms were implemented using two different wireless technologies. The performance was evaluated with a dedicated data-acquisition system and finally, the test results were analyzed. The two different sets of results indicated the high level of amplitude and the temporal accuracy of the wirelessly transferred sensor signals.

No MeSH data available.


Data-integrity protection envelope.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3472813&req=5

f6-sensors-12-10014: Data-integrity protection envelope.

Mentions: Replacing a cable with a wireless interface presents new challenges for the field of data integrity. It is not uncommon to be faced with issues relating to the integrity of readouts transmitted via a wireless interface. This wireless interface is usually small in size and has limited computing capabilities. With some safety-critical applications, like healthcare, data integrity ranks high in the core requirements. Wrong decisions caused by invalid data may harm someone's health or even result in the death of a patient. One such example is wireless blood-pressure monitoring. When used, e.g., in a critical-care unit, many decisions are based on instruments' readouts. If the blood pressure displayed by the patient's monitor is wrong, the patient could receive the wrong treatment, resulting in a critical state. In such cases, it is better not to transfer any data at all than present data that might be invalid. With this in mind, three levels of error detection were implemented: sequence-number checking, control-byte error checking and the checksum calculation. The whole data frame structure is shown in Figure 6.


A wireless interface for replacing the cables in bridge-sensor applications.

Pavlin M, Novak F - Sensors (Basel) (2012)

Data-integrity protection envelope.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3472813&req=5

f6-sensors-12-10014: Data-integrity protection envelope.
Mentions: Replacing a cable with a wireless interface presents new challenges for the field of data integrity. It is not uncommon to be faced with issues relating to the integrity of readouts transmitted via a wireless interface. This wireless interface is usually small in size and has limited computing capabilities. With some safety-critical applications, like healthcare, data integrity ranks high in the core requirements. Wrong decisions caused by invalid data may harm someone's health or even result in the death of a patient. One such example is wireless blood-pressure monitoring. When used, e.g., in a critical-care unit, many decisions are based on instruments' readouts. If the blood pressure displayed by the patient's monitor is wrong, the patient could receive the wrong treatment, resulting in a critical state. In such cases, it is better not to transfer any data at all than present data that might be invalid. With this in mind, three levels of error detection were implemented: sequence-number checking, control-byte error checking and the checksum calculation. The whole data frame structure is shown in Figure 6.

Bottom Line: In this approach, the concept of reciprocal topology is employed, where the transmitter side acquires signals with its own transfer function and the receiver side reconstructs them with the transfer function reciprocal to the transmitter transfer function.The performance was evaluated with a dedicated data-acquisition system and finally, the test results were analyzed.The two different sets of results indicated the high level of amplitude and the temporal accuracy of the wirelessly transferred sensor signals.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: In.Medica d.o.o., Levicnikova 34, 8310 Sentjernej, Slovenia. marko.pavlin@inmedica.si

ABSTRACT
This paper presents a solution in which a wireless interface is employed to replace the cables in bridge-sensor measurement applications. The most noticeable feature of the presented approach is the fact that the wireless interface simply replaces the cables without any additional hardware modification to the existing system. In this approach, the concept of reciprocal topology is employed, where the transmitter side acquires signals with its own transfer function and the receiver side reconstructs them with the transfer function reciprocal to the transmitter transfer function. In this paper the principle of data acquisition and reconstruction is described together with the implementation details of the signal transfer from the sensor to the signal-monitoring equipment. The wireless data communication was investigated and proprietary data-reduction methods were developed. The proposed methods and algorithms were implemented using two different wireless technologies. The performance was evaluated with a dedicated data-acquisition system and finally, the test results were analyzed. The two different sets of results indicated the high level of amplitude and the temporal accuracy of the wirelessly transferred sensor signals.

No MeSH data available.