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Development of new microsatellite markers for Salvia officinalis L. and its potential use in conservation-genetic studies of narrow endemic Salvia brachyodon Vandas.

Radosavljević I, Satovic Z, Jakse J, Javornik B, Greguraš D, Jug-Dujaković M, Liber Z - Int J Mol Sci (2012)

Bottom Line: Out of 30 microsatellite markers tested on the natural S. brachyodon population, 15 were successfully amplified.To obtain evidence of recent bottleneck events in the populations of both species, observed genetic diversity (H(E)) was compared to the expected genetic diversity at mutation-drift equilibrium (H(EQ)) and calculated from the observed number of alleles using a two-phased mutation model (TPM).This result suggests the need to reconsider the current threat category of this endemic species.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Botany, Division of Biology, Faculty of Science, University of Zagreb, Marulićev trg 9A, 10000 Zagreb, Croatia; E-Mails: ivanrad@botanic.hr (I.R.); danijela_greguras@hotmail.com (D.G.).

ABSTRACT
Nine new microsatellite markers (SSR) were isolated from Salvia officinalis L. A total of 125 alleles, with 8 to 21 alleles per locus, were detected in a natural population from the east Adriatic coast. The observed heterozygosity, expected heterozygosity, and polymorphic information content ranged from 0.46 to 0.83, 0.73 to 0.93 and 0.70 to 0.92, respectively. New microsatellite markers, as well as previously published markers, were tested for cross-amplification in Salvia brachyodon Vandas, a narrow endemic species known to be present in only two localities on the Balkan Peninsula. Out of 30 microsatellite markers tested on the natural S. brachyodon population, 15 were successfully amplified. To obtain evidence of recent bottleneck events in the populations of both species, observed genetic diversity (H(E)) was compared to the expected genetic diversity at mutation-drift equilibrium (H(EQ)) and calculated from the observed number of alleles using a two-phased mutation model (TPM). Recent bottleneck events were detected only in the S. brachyodon population. This result suggests the need to reconsider the current threat category of this endemic species.

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Geographic locations of the only known living populations of short-tooth sage (Salvia brachyodon Vandas).
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f2-ijms-13-12082: Geographic locations of the only known living populations of short-tooth sage (Salvia brachyodon Vandas).

Mentions: Short tooth sage (S. brachyodon Vandas) is one of the most interesting species of the Salvia officinalis group from ecological, biogeographical, conservation and phylogenetic points of view (Figure 1). This is a relict species with a very narrow distribution (Figure 2). Although older literature [8–10] indicates its presence in more localities, only two have been confirmed at the present time: Mt. Sveti Ilija on the peninsula of Pelješac (Republic of Croatia) and 150 km southeast of Mt. Orijen (Republic of Bosnia and Herzegovina and Republic of Montenegro) [11–13]. Like many other members of this group, short-tooth sage is also rich in essential oils [14,15], and it is locally recognized and collected, especially in the region of Mt. Orjen [11]. Because of its very limited distribution, habitat fragmentation, succession and potential environmental threats, especially fire and overexploitation, short-tooth sage is a highly vulnerable species. It is noteworthy that the Croatian Red Book [16] classifies this species as near threatened (NT), while in the Republic of Montenegro, it is considered endangered (EN) [17]. In both countries, short-tooth sage is protected by law.


Development of new microsatellite markers for Salvia officinalis L. and its potential use in conservation-genetic studies of narrow endemic Salvia brachyodon Vandas.

Radosavljević I, Satovic Z, Jakse J, Javornik B, Greguraš D, Jug-Dujaković M, Liber Z - Int J Mol Sci (2012)

Geographic locations of the only known living populations of short-tooth sage (Salvia brachyodon Vandas).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3472793&req=5

f2-ijms-13-12082: Geographic locations of the only known living populations of short-tooth sage (Salvia brachyodon Vandas).
Mentions: Short tooth sage (S. brachyodon Vandas) is one of the most interesting species of the Salvia officinalis group from ecological, biogeographical, conservation and phylogenetic points of view (Figure 1). This is a relict species with a very narrow distribution (Figure 2). Although older literature [8–10] indicates its presence in more localities, only two have been confirmed at the present time: Mt. Sveti Ilija on the peninsula of Pelješac (Republic of Croatia) and 150 km southeast of Mt. Orijen (Republic of Bosnia and Herzegovina and Republic of Montenegro) [11–13]. Like many other members of this group, short-tooth sage is also rich in essential oils [14,15], and it is locally recognized and collected, especially in the region of Mt. Orjen [11]. Because of its very limited distribution, habitat fragmentation, succession and potential environmental threats, especially fire and overexploitation, short-tooth sage is a highly vulnerable species. It is noteworthy that the Croatian Red Book [16] classifies this species as near threatened (NT), while in the Republic of Montenegro, it is considered endangered (EN) [17]. In both countries, short-tooth sage is protected by law.

Bottom Line: Out of 30 microsatellite markers tested on the natural S. brachyodon population, 15 were successfully amplified.To obtain evidence of recent bottleneck events in the populations of both species, observed genetic diversity (H(E)) was compared to the expected genetic diversity at mutation-drift equilibrium (H(EQ)) and calculated from the observed number of alleles using a two-phased mutation model (TPM).This result suggests the need to reconsider the current threat category of this endemic species.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Botany, Division of Biology, Faculty of Science, University of Zagreb, Marulićev trg 9A, 10000 Zagreb, Croatia; E-Mails: ivanrad@botanic.hr (I.R.); danijela_greguras@hotmail.com (D.G.).

ABSTRACT
Nine new microsatellite markers (SSR) were isolated from Salvia officinalis L. A total of 125 alleles, with 8 to 21 alleles per locus, were detected in a natural population from the east Adriatic coast. The observed heterozygosity, expected heterozygosity, and polymorphic information content ranged from 0.46 to 0.83, 0.73 to 0.93 and 0.70 to 0.92, respectively. New microsatellite markers, as well as previously published markers, were tested for cross-amplification in Salvia brachyodon Vandas, a narrow endemic species known to be present in only two localities on the Balkan Peninsula. Out of 30 microsatellite markers tested on the natural S. brachyodon population, 15 were successfully amplified. To obtain evidence of recent bottleneck events in the populations of both species, observed genetic diversity (H(E)) was compared to the expected genetic diversity at mutation-drift equilibrium (H(EQ)) and calculated from the observed number of alleles using a two-phased mutation model (TPM). Recent bottleneck events were detected only in the S. brachyodon population. This result suggests the need to reconsider the current threat category of this endemic species.

Show MeSH