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Microsatellite loci in the Gypsophyte Lepidium subulatum (Brassicaceae), and transferability to other Lepidieae.

Martínez-Nieto MI, Merlo ME, Mota JF, Salmerón-Sánchez E, Segarra-Moragues JG - Int J Mol Sci (2012)

Bottom Line: They amplified a total of 80 alleles (2-12 alleles per locus) in a sample of 35 individuals of L. subulatum, showing relatively high levels of genetic diversity, H(O) = 0.645, H(E) = 0.627.Cross-species transferability of all 12 loci was successful for the Iberian endemics Lepidium cardamines, Lepidium stylatum, and the widespread, Lepidium graminifolium and one species each of two related genera, Cardaria draba and Coronopus didymus.These microsatellite primers will be useful to investigate genetic diversity, population structure and to address conservation genetics in species of Lepidium.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Plant Biology and Ecology, CITE-2, University of Almería, Carretera de Sacramento s/n, E-04120 La Cañada de San Urbano, Almería, Spain; E-Mails: emerlo@ual.es (M.E.M.); jmota@ual.es (J.F.M.); esanchez@ual.es (E.S.-S.).

ABSTRACT
Polymorphic microsatellite markers were developed for the Ibero-North African, strict gypsophyte Lepidium subulatum to unravel the effects of habitat fragmentation in levels of genetic diversity, genetic structure and gene flow among its populations. Using 454 pyrosequencing 12 microsatellite loci including di- and tri-nucleotide repeats were characterized in L. subulatum. They amplified a total of 80 alleles (2-12 alleles per locus) in a sample of 35 individuals of L. subulatum, showing relatively high levels of genetic diversity, H(O) = 0.645, H(E) = 0.627. Cross-species transferability of all 12 loci was successful for the Iberian endemics Lepidium cardamines, Lepidium stylatum, and the widespread, Lepidium graminifolium and one species each of two related genera, Cardaria draba and Coronopus didymus. These microsatellite primers will be useful to investigate genetic diversity, population structure and to address conservation genetics in species of Lepidium.

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(a) General habit of Lepidium subulatum; (b) Detail of inflorescence.
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f1-ijms-13-11861: (a) General habit of Lepidium subulatum; (b) Detail of inflorescence.

Mentions: Lepidium L. (Brassicaceae) is a cosmopolitan genus that includes about 175 species of annual to short-lived perennial herbs that inhabit predominantly ruderal habitats, shrublands and rock crevices on cliffs, primarily in temperate and subtropical regions [1]. Several species are adapted to more xeric, steppe habitats, such as the Ibero-North African endemic Lepidium subulatum L. (Sect. Dileptium (Raf.) DC.). This perennial gypsophyte (Figure 1) is diploid with 2n = 2x = 16 chromosomes [2]. This species is ecologically specialized and occurs exclusively in gypsum habitats [3]. Iberian gypsum outcrops show a naturally fragmented and scattered distribution on the eastern half of the Iberian Peninsula. They include a highly diverse and specialized flora including a large number of narrow endemics. However, such habitats have been subjected to diverse human-induced degradation because of their exploitation for gypsum extraction, and the establishment of landfills because of their comparatively lower agricultural productivity. Therefore, they have been identified as potentially sensitive areas for loss of biodiversity and of priority in conservation concerns.


Microsatellite loci in the Gypsophyte Lepidium subulatum (Brassicaceae), and transferability to other Lepidieae.

Martínez-Nieto MI, Merlo ME, Mota JF, Salmerón-Sánchez E, Segarra-Moragues JG - Int J Mol Sci (2012)

(a) General habit of Lepidium subulatum; (b) Detail of inflorescence.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3472779&req=5

f1-ijms-13-11861: (a) General habit of Lepidium subulatum; (b) Detail of inflorescence.
Mentions: Lepidium L. (Brassicaceae) is a cosmopolitan genus that includes about 175 species of annual to short-lived perennial herbs that inhabit predominantly ruderal habitats, shrublands and rock crevices on cliffs, primarily in temperate and subtropical regions [1]. Several species are adapted to more xeric, steppe habitats, such as the Ibero-North African endemic Lepidium subulatum L. (Sect. Dileptium (Raf.) DC.). This perennial gypsophyte (Figure 1) is diploid with 2n = 2x = 16 chromosomes [2]. This species is ecologically specialized and occurs exclusively in gypsum habitats [3]. Iberian gypsum outcrops show a naturally fragmented and scattered distribution on the eastern half of the Iberian Peninsula. They include a highly diverse and specialized flora including a large number of narrow endemics. However, such habitats have been subjected to diverse human-induced degradation because of their exploitation for gypsum extraction, and the establishment of landfills because of their comparatively lower agricultural productivity. Therefore, they have been identified as potentially sensitive areas for loss of biodiversity and of priority in conservation concerns.

Bottom Line: They amplified a total of 80 alleles (2-12 alleles per locus) in a sample of 35 individuals of L. subulatum, showing relatively high levels of genetic diversity, H(O) = 0.645, H(E) = 0.627.Cross-species transferability of all 12 loci was successful for the Iberian endemics Lepidium cardamines, Lepidium stylatum, and the widespread, Lepidium graminifolium and one species each of two related genera, Cardaria draba and Coronopus didymus.These microsatellite primers will be useful to investigate genetic diversity, population structure and to address conservation genetics in species of Lepidium.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Plant Biology and Ecology, CITE-2, University of Almería, Carretera de Sacramento s/n, E-04120 La Cañada de San Urbano, Almería, Spain; E-Mails: emerlo@ual.es (M.E.M.); jmota@ual.es (J.F.M.); esanchez@ual.es (E.S.-S.).

ABSTRACT
Polymorphic microsatellite markers were developed for the Ibero-North African, strict gypsophyte Lepidium subulatum to unravel the effects of habitat fragmentation in levels of genetic diversity, genetic structure and gene flow among its populations. Using 454 pyrosequencing 12 microsatellite loci including di- and tri-nucleotide repeats were characterized in L. subulatum. They amplified a total of 80 alleles (2-12 alleles per locus) in a sample of 35 individuals of L. subulatum, showing relatively high levels of genetic diversity, H(O) = 0.645, H(E) = 0.627. Cross-species transferability of all 12 loci was successful for the Iberian endemics Lepidium cardamines, Lepidium stylatum, and the widespread, Lepidium graminifolium and one species each of two related genera, Cardaria draba and Coronopus didymus. These microsatellite primers will be useful to investigate genetic diversity, population structure and to address conservation genetics in species of Lepidium.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus