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Recent advances in intracellular and in vivo ROS sensing: focus on nanoparticle and nanotube applications.

Uusitalo LM, Hempel N - Int J Mol Sci (2012)

Bottom Line: However, there is a great need to improve on current methods to address the above issues.Recently, the field of molecular sensing and imaging has begun to take advantage of the unique physico-chemical properties of nanoparticles and nanotubes.Here we discuss the recent advances in the use of these nanostructures as alternative platforms for ROS sensing, with particular emphasis on intracellular and in vivo ROS detection and quantification.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Nanobioscience Constellation, College of Nanoscale Sciences & Engineering, University at Albany, SUNY, 257 Fuller Rd., Albany, NY 12203, USA; E-Mail: luusitalo@albany.edu.

ABSTRACT
Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are increasingly being implicated in the regulation of cellular signaling cascades. Intracellular ROS fluxes are associated with cellular function ranging from proliferation to cell death. Moreover, the importance of subtle, spatio-temporal shifts in ROS during localized cellular signaling events is being realized. Understanding the biochemical nature of the ROS involved will enhance our knowledge of redox-signaling. An ideal intracellular sensor should therefore resolve real-time, localized ROS changes, be highly sensitive to physiologically relevant shifts in ROS and provide specificity towards a particular molecule. For in vivo applications issues such as bioavailability of the probe, tissue penetrance of the signal and signal-to-noise ratio also need to be considered. In the past researchers have heavily relied on the use of ROS-sensitive fluorescent probes and, more recently, genetically engineered ROS sensors. However, there is a great need to improve on current methods to address the above issues. Recently, the field of molecular sensing and imaging has begun to take advantage of the unique physico-chemical properties of nanoparticles and nanotubes. Here we discuss the recent advances in the use of these nanostructures as alternative platforms for ROS sensing, with particular emphasis on intracellular and in vivo ROS detection and quantification.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Stepwise quenching of nanotube fluorescence Fluorescent intensity measurements (gray) indicate the transitions between quenching states, as redox mediators partially draw away and release electrons back to the nanotube. These can be converted using a variety of algorithms into a stepwise representation of nanotube fluorescence dynamics (black) indicating the association with or dissociation of single molecules from the nanotube’s surface, as depicted below the graph.
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f2-ijms-13-10660: Stepwise quenching of nanotube fluorescence Fluorescent intensity measurements (gray) indicate the transitions between quenching states, as redox mediators partially draw away and release electrons back to the nanotube. These can be converted using a variety of algorithms into a stepwise representation of nanotube fluorescence dynamics (black) indicating the association with or dissociation of single molecules from the nanotube’s surface, as depicted below the graph.

Mentions: The second class of SWNT H2O2 biosensors holds great promise for the advancing research in ROS and expanding knowledge about their involvement in cell signaling pathways. These sensors utilize the CNTs’ optical properties to permit detection at the single-molecule level. Chemical reactants at the nanotube surface can disturb the distribution of electrons within the nanotube, effectively protonating the sidewall of the nanotube and disturbing exciton-exciton recombination, which quenches fluorescence to some degree [63,95–97]. This quenching, measured as a decrease in the overall fluorescent signal of the nanotube, can be quantified using different algorithms to determine how many molecules are adsorbed to the surface of the nanotube and removing electrons, at any given moment [7,88,98]. This reaction, handily, is reversible. As the transient attraction between the nanotube and the reactant ends, the nanotube is deprotonated and normal fluorescence is reestablished. The quenching and dequenching reactions can occur many times over, as the CNTs are markedly stable (Figure 2).


Recent advances in intracellular and in vivo ROS sensing: focus on nanoparticle and nanotube applications.

Uusitalo LM, Hempel N - Int J Mol Sci (2012)

Stepwise quenching of nanotube fluorescence Fluorescent intensity measurements (gray) indicate the transitions between quenching states, as redox mediators partially draw away and release electrons back to the nanotube. These can be converted using a variety of algorithms into a stepwise representation of nanotube fluorescence dynamics (black) indicating the association with or dissociation of single molecules from the nanotube’s surface, as depicted below the graph.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3472707&req=5

f2-ijms-13-10660: Stepwise quenching of nanotube fluorescence Fluorescent intensity measurements (gray) indicate the transitions between quenching states, as redox mediators partially draw away and release electrons back to the nanotube. These can be converted using a variety of algorithms into a stepwise representation of nanotube fluorescence dynamics (black) indicating the association with or dissociation of single molecules from the nanotube’s surface, as depicted below the graph.
Mentions: The second class of SWNT H2O2 biosensors holds great promise for the advancing research in ROS and expanding knowledge about their involvement in cell signaling pathways. These sensors utilize the CNTs’ optical properties to permit detection at the single-molecule level. Chemical reactants at the nanotube surface can disturb the distribution of electrons within the nanotube, effectively protonating the sidewall of the nanotube and disturbing exciton-exciton recombination, which quenches fluorescence to some degree [63,95–97]. This quenching, measured as a decrease in the overall fluorescent signal of the nanotube, can be quantified using different algorithms to determine how many molecules are adsorbed to the surface of the nanotube and removing electrons, at any given moment [7,88,98]. This reaction, handily, is reversible. As the transient attraction between the nanotube and the reactant ends, the nanotube is deprotonated and normal fluorescence is reestablished. The quenching and dequenching reactions can occur many times over, as the CNTs are markedly stable (Figure 2).

Bottom Line: However, there is a great need to improve on current methods to address the above issues.Recently, the field of molecular sensing and imaging has begun to take advantage of the unique physico-chemical properties of nanoparticles and nanotubes.Here we discuss the recent advances in the use of these nanostructures as alternative platforms for ROS sensing, with particular emphasis on intracellular and in vivo ROS detection and quantification.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Nanobioscience Constellation, College of Nanoscale Sciences & Engineering, University at Albany, SUNY, 257 Fuller Rd., Albany, NY 12203, USA; E-Mail: luusitalo@albany.edu.

ABSTRACT
Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are increasingly being implicated in the regulation of cellular signaling cascades. Intracellular ROS fluxes are associated with cellular function ranging from proliferation to cell death. Moreover, the importance of subtle, spatio-temporal shifts in ROS during localized cellular signaling events is being realized. Understanding the biochemical nature of the ROS involved will enhance our knowledge of redox-signaling. An ideal intracellular sensor should therefore resolve real-time, localized ROS changes, be highly sensitive to physiologically relevant shifts in ROS and provide specificity towards a particular molecule. For in vivo applications issues such as bioavailability of the probe, tissue penetrance of the signal and signal-to-noise ratio also need to be considered. In the past researchers have heavily relied on the use of ROS-sensitive fluorescent probes and, more recently, genetically engineered ROS sensors. However, there is a great need to improve on current methods to address the above issues. Recently, the field of molecular sensing and imaging has begun to take advantage of the unique physico-chemical properties of nanoparticles and nanotubes. Here we discuss the recent advances in the use of these nanostructures as alternative platforms for ROS sensing, with particular emphasis on intracellular and in vivo ROS detection and quantification.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus