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The NKI-Rockland Sample: A Model for Accelerating the Pace of Discovery Science in Psychiatry.

Nooner KB, Colcombe SJ, Tobe RH, Mennes M, Benedict MM, Moreno AL, Panek LJ, Brown S, Zavitz ST, Li Q, Sikka S, Gutman D, Bangaru S, Schlachter RT, Kamiel SM, Anwar AR, Hinz CM, Kaplan MS, Rachlin AB, Adelsberg S, Cheung B, Khanuja R, Yan C, Craddock CC, Calhoun V, Courtney W, King M, Wood D, Cox CL, Kelly AM, Di Martino A, Petkova E, Reiss PT, Duan N, Thomsen D, Biswal B, Coffey B, Hoptman MJ, Javitt DC, Pomara N, Sidtis JJ, Koplewicz HS, Castellanos FX, Leventhal BL, Milham MP - Front Neurosci (2012)

Bottom Line: Additionally, we describe our process for sharing the data with the scientific community while protecting participant confidentiality, maintaining an adequate database, and certifying data integrity.The pilot phase of the NKI-RS, including challenges in recruiting, characterizing, imaging, and sharing data, is discussed while also explaining how this experience informed the final design of the enhanced NKI-RS.It is our hope that familiarity with the conceptual underpinnings of the enhanced NKI-RS will facilitate harmonization with future data collection efforts aimed at advancing psychiatric neuroscience and nosology.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Nathan S. Kline Institute for Psychiatric Research Orangeburg, NY, USA ; Psychology Department, University of North Carolina Wilmington, NC, USA.

ABSTRACT
The National Institute of Mental Health strategic plan for advancing psychiatric neuroscience calls for an acceleration of discovery and the delineation of developmental trajectories for risk and resilience across the lifespan. To attain these objectives, sufficiently powered datasets with broad and deep phenotypic characterization, state-of-the-art neuroimaging, and genetic samples must be generated and made openly available to the scientific community. The enhanced Nathan Kline Institute-Rockland Sample (NKI-RS) is a response to this need. NKI-RS is an ongoing, institutionally centered endeavor aimed at creating a large-scale (N > 1000), deeply phenotyped, community-ascertained, lifespan sample (ages 6-85 years old) with advanced neuroimaging and genetics. These data will be publically shared, openly, and prospectively (i.e., on a weekly basis). Herein, we describe the conceptual basis of the NKI-RS, including study design, sampling considerations, and steps to synchronize phenotypic and neuroimaging assessment. Additionally, we describe our process for sharing the data with the scientific community while protecting participant confidentiality, maintaining an adequate database, and certifying data integrity. The pilot phase of the NKI-RS, including challenges in recruiting, characterizing, imaging, and sharing data, is discussed while also explaining how this experience informed the final design of the enhanced NKI-RS. It is our hope that familiarity with the conceptual underpinnings of the enhanced NKI-RS will facilitate harmonization with future data collection efforts aimed at advancing psychiatric neuroscience and nosology.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Sample schedule for child and parent participants in NKI-RS. This figure illustrates the 2-day assessment schedule for child and parent participants (children ages 6–17 years) in the Nathan Kline Institute-Rockland Sample (NKI-RS) protocol. Abbreviations for the assessments: ANT, Attention Network Task; ASSQ, Autism Spectrum Screening Questionnaire; ATQ, Adult Temperament Questionnaire; BASC-2, Behavioral Assessment System for Children; CASI-AOD, Comprehensive Adolescent Severity Inventory-Alcohol and Other Drugs; CASS-S, Conner-Wells’ Adolescent Self-Report Scale-Short; CBCL, Child Behavioral Checklist; CBQ, Children’s Behavior Questionnaire; CFQ, Cognitive Failures Questionnaire; CDI-II, Children’s Depression Inventory-II; CEBQ, Child Eating Behavior Questionnaire; CPRS-R-S, Conners’ Parent Rating Scale-Revised-Short; CY-BOCS, Children’s Yale-Brown Obsessive Compulsive Scale; EATQ, Early Adolescent Temperament Questionnaire Parent Report; EDEQ, Eating Disorder Examination Questionnaire; EHI, Edinburgh Handedness Inventory; FTAQ, Fagerstrom Tolerance Questionnaire for Adolescents; ICU-P, Inventory of Callous-Unemotional Traits Parent Report; ICU-Y, Inventory of Callous-Unemotional Traits Youth Version; IPAQ, International Physical Activity Questionnaire; IRI, Interpersonal Reactivity Index; K-SADS-PL, Kiddie Schedule for Affective Disorders and Schizophrenia; MASC, Multidimensional Anxiety Scale for Children; MRI-Q, Magnetic Resonance Imaging Questionnaire; NEO-FFI, NEO Five Factor Inventory; PSQI, Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index; RBSR, Repetitive Behavior Scale-Revised; SES, Hollingshead Four Factor Index of Socioeconomic Status; SRS, Social Responsiveness Scale-Parent Report; SWAN, Strengths and Weaknesses of Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder Symptoms and Normal-Behavior Scale-Parent Version; TANN, Tanner Staging; TFEQ, Three Factor Eating Questionnaire; TSC-C, Trauma Symptom Checklist for Children; UCLA-RI, UCLA PTSD Reaction Index for Children and Adolescents; UCLA-RI-P, UCLA PTSD Reaction Index–Parent version; Vineland-II, Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scales Parent Rating Form, Second Edition; WASI-II, Wechsler Abbreviated Scale of Intelligence-II; WIAT-II-A, Wechsler Individual Achievement Test-II-Abbreviated; YGTSS, Yale Global Tic Severity Scale; YRBSS, Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance System; YSR, Achenbach Youth Self Report.
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Figure 3: Sample schedule for child and parent participants in NKI-RS. This figure illustrates the 2-day assessment schedule for child and parent participants (children ages 6–17 years) in the Nathan Kline Institute-Rockland Sample (NKI-RS) protocol. Abbreviations for the assessments: ANT, Attention Network Task; ASSQ, Autism Spectrum Screening Questionnaire; ATQ, Adult Temperament Questionnaire; BASC-2, Behavioral Assessment System for Children; CASI-AOD, Comprehensive Adolescent Severity Inventory-Alcohol and Other Drugs; CASS-S, Conner-Wells’ Adolescent Self-Report Scale-Short; CBCL, Child Behavioral Checklist; CBQ, Children’s Behavior Questionnaire; CFQ, Cognitive Failures Questionnaire; CDI-II, Children’s Depression Inventory-II; CEBQ, Child Eating Behavior Questionnaire; CPRS-R-S, Conners’ Parent Rating Scale-Revised-Short; CY-BOCS, Children’s Yale-Brown Obsessive Compulsive Scale; EATQ, Early Adolescent Temperament Questionnaire Parent Report; EDEQ, Eating Disorder Examination Questionnaire; EHI, Edinburgh Handedness Inventory; FTAQ, Fagerstrom Tolerance Questionnaire for Adolescents; ICU-P, Inventory of Callous-Unemotional Traits Parent Report; ICU-Y, Inventory of Callous-Unemotional Traits Youth Version; IPAQ, International Physical Activity Questionnaire; IRI, Interpersonal Reactivity Index; K-SADS-PL, Kiddie Schedule for Affective Disorders and Schizophrenia; MASC, Multidimensional Anxiety Scale for Children; MRI-Q, Magnetic Resonance Imaging Questionnaire; NEO-FFI, NEO Five Factor Inventory; PSQI, Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index; RBSR, Repetitive Behavior Scale-Revised; SES, Hollingshead Four Factor Index of Socioeconomic Status; SRS, Social Responsiveness Scale-Parent Report; SWAN, Strengths and Weaknesses of Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder Symptoms and Normal-Behavior Scale-Parent Version; TANN, Tanner Staging; TFEQ, Three Factor Eating Questionnaire; TSC-C, Trauma Symptom Checklist for Children; UCLA-RI, UCLA PTSD Reaction Index for Children and Adolescents; UCLA-RI-P, UCLA PTSD Reaction Index–Parent version; Vineland-II, Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scales Parent Rating Form, Second Edition; WASI-II, Wechsler Abbreviated Scale of Intelligence-II; WIAT-II-A, Wechsler Individual Achievement Test-II-Abbreviated; YGTSS, Yale Global Tic Severity Scale; YRBSS, Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance System; YSR, Achenbach Youth Self Report.

Mentions: Our approach, similar to that of the Brain Genomics Superstruct (Yeo et al., 2011), differs from the more common model of centering collaborative efforts on a particular disorder or set of disorders, which can limit the applicability of a comparison sample. Given the current focus on developing a dimensional framework for psychiatric illnesses and patterns of comorbidity (Chabernaud et al., 2012), we adopted broad phenotypic characterization for phase two of NKI-RS. By employing a common protocol that covers a wide array of domains of psychiatric, cognitive, and behavioral functions, we can make direct comparisons between psychiatric illnesses and increase the feasibility of determining overlap and distinctions among their neural correlates. During review of the finalized phenotyping protocol by the SRC, a key concern that emerged was that the comprehensiveness of the phenotyping protocol increased the burden to participants and experimenters – potentially endangering its effectiveness due to factors such as fatigue and increased data management needs. To address these concerns, the NKI-RS protocol was decompressed from a 1- to a 2-day format. As discussed below, state-of-the-art computer based data entry, scoring, and management capabilities were added, thereby minimizing burden on both participants and experimenters3. Additionally, we carried out focus-group testing prior to initiation of the sample, and are obtaining customer satisfaction surveys and monitoring participant feedback as we progress so that small tweaks to the protocol can be made as necessary (preferably within the first 100 participants; Figures 2 and 3).


The NKI-Rockland Sample: A Model for Accelerating the Pace of Discovery Science in Psychiatry.

Nooner KB, Colcombe SJ, Tobe RH, Mennes M, Benedict MM, Moreno AL, Panek LJ, Brown S, Zavitz ST, Li Q, Sikka S, Gutman D, Bangaru S, Schlachter RT, Kamiel SM, Anwar AR, Hinz CM, Kaplan MS, Rachlin AB, Adelsberg S, Cheung B, Khanuja R, Yan C, Craddock CC, Calhoun V, Courtney W, King M, Wood D, Cox CL, Kelly AM, Di Martino A, Petkova E, Reiss PT, Duan N, Thomsen D, Biswal B, Coffey B, Hoptman MJ, Javitt DC, Pomara N, Sidtis JJ, Koplewicz HS, Castellanos FX, Leventhal BL, Milham MP - Front Neurosci (2012)

Sample schedule for child and parent participants in NKI-RS. This figure illustrates the 2-day assessment schedule for child and parent participants (children ages 6–17 years) in the Nathan Kline Institute-Rockland Sample (NKI-RS) protocol. Abbreviations for the assessments: ANT, Attention Network Task; ASSQ, Autism Spectrum Screening Questionnaire; ATQ, Adult Temperament Questionnaire; BASC-2, Behavioral Assessment System for Children; CASI-AOD, Comprehensive Adolescent Severity Inventory-Alcohol and Other Drugs; CASS-S, Conner-Wells’ Adolescent Self-Report Scale-Short; CBCL, Child Behavioral Checklist; CBQ, Children’s Behavior Questionnaire; CFQ, Cognitive Failures Questionnaire; CDI-II, Children’s Depression Inventory-II; CEBQ, Child Eating Behavior Questionnaire; CPRS-R-S, Conners’ Parent Rating Scale-Revised-Short; CY-BOCS, Children’s Yale-Brown Obsessive Compulsive Scale; EATQ, Early Adolescent Temperament Questionnaire Parent Report; EDEQ, Eating Disorder Examination Questionnaire; EHI, Edinburgh Handedness Inventory; FTAQ, Fagerstrom Tolerance Questionnaire for Adolescents; ICU-P, Inventory of Callous-Unemotional Traits Parent Report; ICU-Y, Inventory of Callous-Unemotional Traits Youth Version; IPAQ, International Physical Activity Questionnaire; IRI, Interpersonal Reactivity Index; K-SADS-PL, Kiddie Schedule for Affective Disorders and Schizophrenia; MASC, Multidimensional Anxiety Scale for Children; MRI-Q, Magnetic Resonance Imaging Questionnaire; NEO-FFI, NEO Five Factor Inventory; PSQI, Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index; RBSR, Repetitive Behavior Scale-Revised; SES, Hollingshead Four Factor Index of Socioeconomic Status; SRS, Social Responsiveness Scale-Parent Report; SWAN, Strengths and Weaknesses of Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder Symptoms and Normal-Behavior Scale-Parent Version; TANN, Tanner Staging; TFEQ, Three Factor Eating Questionnaire; TSC-C, Trauma Symptom Checklist for Children; UCLA-RI, UCLA PTSD Reaction Index for Children and Adolescents; UCLA-RI-P, UCLA PTSD Reaction Index–Parent version; Vineland-II, Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scales Parent Rating Form, Second Edition; WASI-II, Wechsler Abbreviated Scale of Intelligence-II; WIAT-II-A, Wechsler Individual Achievement Test-II-Abbreviated; YGTSS, Yale Global Tic Severity Scale; YRBSS, Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance System; YSR, Achenbach Youth Self Report.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3472598&req=5

Figure 3: Sample schedule for child and parent participants in NKI-RS. This figure illustrates the 2-day assessment schedule for child and parent participants (children ages 6–17 years) in the Nathan Kline Institute-Rockland Sample (NKI-RS) protocol. Abbreviations for the assessments: ANT, Attention Network Task; ASSQ, Autism Spectrum Screening Questionnaire; ATQ, Adult Temperament Questionnaire; BASC-2, Behavioral Assessment System for Children; CASI-AOD, Comprehensive Adolescent Severity Inventory-Alcohol and Other Drugs; CASS-S, Conner-Wells’ Adolescent Self-Report Scale-Short; CBCL, Child Behavioral Checklist; CBQ, Children’s Behavior Questionnaire; CFQ, Cognitive Failures Questionnaire; CDI-II, Children’s Depression Inventory-II; CEBQ, Child Eating Behavior Questionnaire; CPRS-R-S, Conners’ Parent Rating Scale-Revised-Short; CY-BOCS, Children’s Yale-Brown Obsessive Compulsive Scale; EATQ, Early Adolescent Temperament Questionnaire Parent Report; EDEQ, Eating Disorder Examination Questionnaire; EHI, Edinburgh Handedness Inventory; FTAQ, Fagerstrom Tolerance Questionnaire for Adolescents; ICU-P, Inventory of Callous-Unemotional Traits Parent Report; ICU-Y, Inventory of Callous-Unemotional Traits Youth Version; IPAQ, International Physical Activity Questionnaire; IRI, Interpersonal Reactivity Index; K-SADS-PL, Kiddie Schedule for Affective Disorders and Schizophrenia; MASC, Multidimensional Anxiety Scale for Children; MRI-Q, Magnetic Resonance Imaging Questionnaire; NEO-FFI, NEO Five Factor Inventory; PSQI, Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index; RBSR, Repetitive Behavior Scale-Revised; SES, Hollingshead Four Factor Index of Socioeconomic Status; SRS, Social Responsiveness Scale-Parent Report; SWAN, Strengths and Weaknesses of Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder Symptoms and Normal-Behavior Scale-Parent Version; TANN, Tanner Staging; TFEQ, Three Factor Eating Questionnaire; TSC-C, Trauma Symptom Checklist for Children; UCLA-RI, UCLA PTSD Reaction Index for Children and Adolescents; UCLA-RI-P, UCLA PTSD Reaction Index–Parent version; Vineland-II, Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scales Parent Rating Form, Second Edition; WASI-II, Wechsler Abbreviated Scale of Intelligence-II; WIAT-II-A, Wechsler Individual Achievement Test-II-Abbreviated; YGTSS, Yale Global Tic Severity Scale; YRBSS, Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance System; YSR, Achenbach Youth Self Report.
Mentions: Our approach, similar to that of the Brain Genomics Superstruct (Yeo et al., 2011), differs from the more common model of centering collaborative efforts on a particular disorder or set of disorders, which can limit the applicability of a comparison sample. Given the current focus on developing a dimensional framework for psychiatric illnesses and patterns of comorbidity (Chabernaud et al., 2012), we adopted broad phenotypic characterization for phase two of NKI-RS. By employing a common protocol that covers a wide array of domains of psychiatric, cognitive, and behavioral functions, we can make direct comparisons between psychiatric illnesses and increase the feasibility of determining overlap and distinctions among their neural correlates. During review of the finalized phenotyping protocol by the SRC, a key concern that emerged was that the comprehensiveness of the phenotyping protocol increased the burden to participants and experimenters – potentially endangering its effectiveness due to factors such as fatigue and increased data management needs. To address these concerns, the NKI-RS protocol was decompressed from a 1- to a 2-day format. As discussed below, state-of-the-art computer based data entry, scoring, and management capabilities were added, thereby minimizing burden on both participants and experimenters3. Additionally, we carried out focus-group testing prior to initiation of the sample, and are obtaining customer satisfaction surveys and monitoring participant feedback as we progress so that small tweaks to the protocol can be made as necessary (preferably within the first 100 participants; Figures 2 and 3).

Bottom Line: Additionally, we describe our process for sharing the data with the scientific community while protecting participant confidentiality, maintaining an adequate database, and certifying data integrity.The pilot phase of the NKI-RS, including challenges in recruiting, characterizing, imaging, and sharing data, is discussed while also explaining how this experience informed the final design of the enhanced NKI-RS.It is our hope that familiarity with the conceptual underpinnings of the enhanced NKI-RS will facilitate harmonization with future data collection efforts aimed at advancing psychiatric neuroscience and nosology.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Nathan S. Kline Institute for Psychiatric Research Orangeburg, NY, USA ; Psychology Department, University of North Carolina Wilmington, NC, USA.

ABSTRACT
The National Institute of Mental Health strategic plan for advancing psychiatric neuroscience calls for an acceleration of discovery and the delineation of developmental trajectories for risk and resilience across the lifespan. To attain these objectives, sufficiently powered datasets with broad and deep phenotypic characterization, state-of-the-art neuroimaging, and genetic samples must be generated and made openly available to the scientific community. The enhanced Nathan Kline Institute-Rockland Sample (NKI-RS) is a response to this need. NKI-RS is an ongoing, institutionally centered endeavor aimed at creating a large-scale (N > 1000), deeply phenotyped, community-ascertained, lifespan sample (ages 6-85 years old) with advanced neuroimaging and genetics. These data will be publically shared, openly, and prospectively (i.e., on a weekly basis). Herein, we describe the conceptual basis of the NKI-RS, including study design, sampling considerations, and steps to synchronize phenotypic and neuroimaging assessment. Additionally, we describe our process for sharing the data with the scientific community while protecting participant confidentiality, maintaining an adequate database, and certifying data integrity. The pilot phase of the NKI-RS, including challenges in recruiting, characterizing, imaging, and sharing data, is discussed while also explaining how this experience informed the final design of the enhanced NKI-RS. It is our hope that familiarity with the conceptual underpinnings of the enhanced NKI-RS will facilitate harmonization with future data collection efforts aimed at advancing psychiatric neuroscience and nosology.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus