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The NKI-Rockland Sample: A Model for Accelerating the Pace of Discovery Science in Psychiatry.

Nooner KB, Colcombe SJ, Tobe RH, Mennes M, Benedict MM, Moreno AL, Panek LJ, Brown S, Zavitz ST, Li Q, Sikka S, Gutman D, Bangaru S, Schlachter RT, Kamiel SM, Anwar AR, Hinz CM, Kaplan MS, Rachlin AB, Adelsberg S, Cheung B, Khanuja R, Yan C, Craddock CC, Calhoun V, Courtney W, King M, Wood D, Cox CL, Kelly AM, Di Martino A, Petkova E, Reiss PT, Duan N, Thomsen D, Biswal B, Coffey B, Hoptman MJ, Javitt DC, Pomara N, Sidtis JJ, Koplewicz HS, Castellanos FX, Leventhal BL, Milham MP - Front Neurosci (2012)

Bottom Line: Additionally, we describe our process for sharing the data with the scientific community while protecting participant confidentiality, maintaining an adequate database, and certifying data integrity.The pilot phase of the NKI-RS, including challenges in recruiting, characterizing, imaging, and sharing data, is discussed while also explaining how this experience informed the final design of the enhanced NKI-RS.It is our hope that familiarity with the conceptual underpinnings of the enhanced NKI-RS will facilitate harmonization with future data collection efforts aimed at advancing psychiatric neuroscience and nosology.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Nathan S. Kline Institute for Psychiatric Research Orangeburg, NY, USA ; Psychology Department, University of North Carolina Wilmington, NC, USA.

ABSTRACT
The National Institute of Mental Health strategic plan for advancing psychiatric neuroscience calls for an acceleration of discovery and the delineation of developmental trajectories for risk and resilience across the lifespan. To attain these objectives, sufficiently powered datasets with broad and deep phenotypic characterization, state-of-the-art neuroimaging, and genetic samples must be generated and made openly available to the scientific community. The enhanced Nathan Kline Institute-Rockland Sample (NKI-RS) is a response to this need. NKI-RS is an ongoing, institutionally centered endeavor aimed at creating a large-scale (N > 1000), deeply phenotyped, community-ascertained, lifespan sample (ages 6-85 years old) with advanced neuroimaging and genetics. These data will be publically shared, openly, and prospectively (i.e., on a weekly basis). Herein, we describe the conceptual basis of the NKI-RS, including study design, sampling considerations, and steps to synchronize phenotypic and neuroimaging assessment. Additionally, we describe our process for sharing the data with the scientific community while protecting participant confidentiality, maintaining an adequate database, and certifying data integrity. The pilot phase of the NKI-RS, including challenges in recruiting, characterizing, imaging, and sharing data, is discussed while also explaining how this experience informed the final design of the enhanced NKI-RS. It is our hope that familiarity with the conceptual underpinnings of the enhanced NKI-RS will facilitate harmonization with future data collection efforts aimed at advancing psychiatric neuroscience and nosology.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Assessment protocol for NKI-RS. This figure illustrates all of the assessments that are included in the 2-day enhanced Nathan Kline Institute-Rockland Sample (NKI-RS) protocol. There are five broad domains of assessment: General, Physical, Neurocognitive, Diagnostic, and Behavioral. Within the table are the names, abbreviations, and age ranges in years for each of the assessments.
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Figure 1: Assessment protocol for NKI-RS. This figure illustrates all of the assessments that are included in the 2-day enhanced Nathan Kline Institute-Rockland Sample (NKI-RS) protocol. There are five broad domains of assessment: General, Physical, Neurocognitive, Diagnostic, and Behavioral. Within the table are the names, abbreviations, and age ranges in years for each of the assessments.

Mentions: Phase two of the NKI-RS project will contain broader and deeper phenotypic characterization of participants, with a focus on key psychiatric and neurocognitive constructs. The battery for the second phase was constructed based on discussions with assessment developers, expert consultants, and a formal presentation to the Child Mind Institute’s Scientific Research Council (SRC)2. We prioritized inclusion of empirically validated measures in the public domain, as those are most amenable to widespread adoption in other studies. Additionally, we prioritized use of measures that could be administered and compared across the lifespan. In attempting to serve as a resource for future studies, the second phase compares commonly used assessments that measure the same construct, behavior, or disorder. We also compare proprietary and non-proprietary assessments (e.g., the Conners ADHD Scales (Conners et al., 1997; Conners, 1999) versus Strengths and Weaknesses of ADHD-Symptoms and Normal-Behavior Scale (SWAN; Hay et al., 2007, respectively), and can assess the construct validity of different assessments (e.g., the Computerized Neurocognitive Battery (Gur et al., 2001) versus the Delis–Kaplan Executive Functioning System (Delis et al., 2004; Figure 1).


The NKI-Rockland Sample: A Model for Accelerating the Pace of Discovery Science in Psychiatry.

Nooner KB, Colcombe SJ, Tobe RH, Mennes M, Benedict MM, Moreno AL, Panek LJ, Brown S, Zavitz ST, Li Q, Sikka S, Gutman D, Bangaru S, Schlachter RT, Kamiel SM, Anwar AR, Hinz CM, Kaplan MS, Rachlin AB, Adelsberg S, Cheung B, Khanuja R, Yan C, Craddock CC, Calhoun V, Courtney W, King M, Wood D, Cox CL, Kelly AM, Di Martino A, Petkova E, Reiss PT, Duan N, Thomsen D, Biswal B, Coffey B, Hoptman MJ, Javitt DC, Pomara N, Sidtis JJ, Koplewicz HS, Castellanos FX, Leventhal BL, Milham MP - Front Neurosci (2012)

Assessment protocol for NKI-RS. This figure illustrates all of the assessments that are included in the 2-day enhanced Nathan Kline Institute-Rockland Sample (NKI-RS) protocol. There are five broad domains of assessment: General, Physical, Neurocognitive, Diagnostic, and Behavioral. Within the table are the names, abbreviations, and age ranges in years for each of the assessments.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3472598&req=5

Figure 1: Assessment protocol for NKI-RS. This figure illustrates all of the assessments that are included in the 2-day enhanced Nathan Kline Institute-Rockland Sample (NKI-RS) protocol. There are five broad domains of assessment: General, Physical, Neurocognitive, Diagnostic, and Behavioral. Within the table are the names, abbreviations, and age ranges in years for each of the assessments.
Mentions: Phase two of the NKI-RS project will contain broader and deeper phenotypic characterization of participants, with a focus on key psychiatric and neurocognitive constructs. The battery for the second phase was constructed based on discussions with assessment developers, expert consultants, and a formal presentation to the Child Mind Institute’s Scientific Research Council (SRC)2. We prioritized inclusion of empirically validated measures in the public domain, as those are most amenable to widespread adoption in other studies. Additionally, we prioritized use of measures that could be administered and compared across the lifespan. In attempting to serve as a resource for future studies, the second phase compares commonly used assessments that measure the same construct, behavior, or disorder. We also compare proprietary and non-proprietary assessments (e.g., the Conners ADHD Scales (Conners et al., 1997; Conners, 1999) versus Strengths and Weaknesses of ADHD-Symptoms and Normal-Behavior Scale (SWAN; Hay et al., 2007, respectively), and can assess the construct validity of different assessments (e.g., the Computerized Neurocognitive Battery (Gur et al., 2001) versus the Delis–Kaplan Executive Functioning System (Delis et al., 2004; Figure 1).

Bottom Line: Additionally, we describe our process for sharing the data with the scientific community while protecting participant confidentiality, maintaining an adequate database, and certifying data integrity.The pilot phase of the NKI-RS, including challenges in recruiting, characterizing, imaging, and sharing data, is discussed while also explaining how this experience informed the final design of the enhanced NKI-RS.It is our hope that familiarity with the conceptual underpinnings of the enhanced NKI-RS will facilitate harmonization with future data collection efforts aimed at advancing psychiatric neuroscience and nosology.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Nathan S. Kline Institute for Psychiatric Research Orangeburg, NY, USA ; Psychology Department, University of North Carolina Wilmington, NC, USA.

ABSTRACT
The National Institute of Mental Health strategic plan for advancing psychiatric neuroscience calls for an acceleration of discovery and the delineation of developmental trajectories for risk and resilience across the lifespan. To attain these objectives, sufficiently powered datasets with broad and deep phenotypic characterization, state-of-the-art neuroimaging, and genetic samples must be generated and made openly available to the scientific community. The enhanced Nathan Kline Institute-Rockland Sample (NKI-RS) is a response to this need. NKI-RS is an ongoing, institutionally centered endeavor aimed at creating a large-scale (N > 1000), deeply phenotyped, community-ascertained, lifespan sample (ages 6-85 years old) with advanced neuroimaging and genetics. These data will be publically shared, openly, and prospectively (i.e., on a weekly basis). Herein, we describe the conceptual basis of the NKI-RS, including study design, sampling considerations, and steps to synchronize phenotypic and neuroimaging assessment. Additionally, we describe our process for sharing the data with the scientific community while protecting participant confidentiality, maintaining an adequate database, and certifying data integrity. The pilot phase of the NKI-RS, including challenges in recruiting, characterizing, imaging, and sharing data, is discussed while also explaining how this experience informed the final design of the enhanced NKI-RS. It is our hope that familiarity with the conceptual underpinnings of the enhanced NKI-RS will facilitate harmonization with future data collection efforts aimed at advancing psychiatric neuroscience and nosology.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus