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Duration reproduction with sensory feedback delay: differential involvement of perception and action time.

Ganzenmüller S, Shi Z, Müller HJ - Front Integr Neurosci (2012)

Bottom Line: However, whether and how sensorimotor delay affects duration reproduction is still unclear.These findings indicate that participants tend to mix the onset of action and the feedback signal more when the feedback is delayed, and they heavily rely on motor-stop signals for the duration reproduction.Furthermore, auditory duration was overestimated compared to visual duration in crossmodal feedback conditions, and the overestimation of auditory duration (or the underestimation of visual duration) was independent of the delay manipulation.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department Psychology, General and Experimental Psychology LMU Munich, Germany ; Graduate School of Systemic Neuroscience LMU Munich, Germany.

ABSTRACT
Previous research has shown that voluntary action can attract subsequent, delayed feedback events toward the action, and adaptation to the sensorimotor delay can even reverse motor-sensory temporal order judgments. However, whether and how sensorimotor delay affects duration reproduction is still unclear. To investigate this, we injected an onset- or offset-delay to the sensory feedback signal from a duration reproduction task. We compared duration reproductions within (visual, auditory) modality and across audiovisual modalities with feedback signal onset- and offset-delay manipulations. We found that the reproduced duration was lengthened in both visual and auditory feedback signal onset-delay conditions. The lengthening effect was evident immediately, on the first trial with the onset-delay. However, when the onset of the feedback signal was prior to the action, the lengthening effect was diminished. In contrast, a shortening effect was found with feedback signal offset-delay, though the effect was weaker and manifested only in the auditory offset-delay condition. These findings indicate that participants tend to mix the onset of action and the feedback signal more when the feedback is delayed, and they heavily rely on motor-stop signals for the duration reproduction. Furthermore, auditory duration was overestimated compared to visual duration in crossmodal feedback conditions, and the overestimation of auditory duration (or the underestimation of visual duration) was independent of the delay manipulation.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Schematic illustration of the experimental design. A standard duration reproduction paradigm with manipulation of feedback delays during reproduction. An auditory or visual stimulus is presented first as a standard duration. Participants reproduce the standard by pressing a button. Another auditory or visual stimulus is fed back to participants based on the action. The feedback signal could be synchronous to the key press (A synchronous-feedback condition), or be delayed 200 ms at the onset of the feedback but simultaneously stops at button release (B onset-delay feedback condition), or starts synchronously with the button press but stops 200 ms after the button release (C offset-delay feedback condition).
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Figure 1: Schematic illustration of the experimental design. A standard duration reproduction paradigm with manipulation of feedback delays during reproduction. An auditory or visual stimulus is presented first as a standard duration. Participants reproduce the standard by pressing a button. Another auditory or visual stimulus is fed back to participants based on the action. The feedback signal could be synchronous to the key press (A synchronous-feedback condition), or be delayed 200 ms at the onset of the feedback but simultaneously stops at button release (B onset-delay feedback condition), or starts synchronously with the button press but stops 200 ms after the button release (C offset-delay feedback condition).

Mentions: We adopted and modified an action-based duration reproduction task with feedback, as introduced by Bueti and Walsh (2010). Each trial started with a standard duration, either 800 or 1200 ms in length, in the form of an auditory tone (Experiments 1 and 4) or an LED light (Experiments 2 and 3). Following the presentation of the standard duration, participants were asked to reproduce the duration as accurately as possible by button press, with reproduction duration demarcated by the onset and offset of the press action. Pressing the button also induced a feedback signal (a tone in Experiments 1 and 3, an LED light in Experiments 2 and 4) whose onset or offset could deviate from the onset or offset of the button press (see Figure 1 and next paragraph). Subjects were told that feedback signal could be either dependent or independent of their button press. They were specifically instructed to reproduce the standard duration as accurately as possible by pressing down the button, regardless of the feedback signals (see the detail instruction in the “Appendix”). To distinguish and counter-balance the standard and feedback stimuli, half of the participants received high tones (or red lights) as standard stimuli and low tones (or blue lights) as the ± feedback stimuli, and vice versa for the other half.


Duration reproduction with sensory feedback delay: differential involvement of perception and action time.

Ganzenmüller S, Shi Z, Müller HJ - Front Integr Neurosci (2012)

Schematic illustration of the experimental design. A standard duration reproduction paradigm with manipulation of feedback delays during reproduction. An auditory or visual stimulus is presented first as a standard duration. Participants reproduce the standard by pressing a button. Another auditory or visual stimulus is fed back to participants based on the action. The feedback signal could be synchronous to the key press (A synchronous-feedback condition), or be delayed 200 ms at the onset of the feedback but simultaneously stops at button release (B onset-delay feedback condition), or starts synchronously with the button press but stops 200 ms after the button release (C offset-delay feedback condition).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3472406&req=5

Figure 1: Schematic illustration of the experimental design. A standard duration reproduction paradigm with manipulation of feedback delays during reproduction. An auditory or visual stimulus is presented first as a standard duration. Participants reproduce the standard by pressing a button. Another auditory or visual stimulus is fed back to participants based on the action. The feedback signal could be synchronous to the key press (A synchronous-feedback condition), or be delayed 200 ms at the onset of the feedback but simultaneously stops at button release (B onset-delay feedback condition), or starts synchronously with the button press but stops 200 ms after the button release (C offset-delay feedback condition).
Mentions: We adopted and modified an action-based duration reproduction task with feedback, as introduced by Bueti and Walsh (2010). Each trial started with a standard duration, either 800 or 1200 ms in length, in the form of an auditory tone (Experiments 1 and 4) or an LED light (Experiments 2 and 3). Following the presentation of the standard duration, participants were asked to reproduce the duration as accurately as possible by button press, with reproduction duration demarcated by the onset and offset of the press action. Pressing the button also induced a feedback signal (a tone in Experiments 1 and 3, an LED light in Experiments 2 and 4) whose onset or offset could deviate from the onset or offset of the button press (see Figure 1 and next paragraph). Subjects were told that feedback signal could be either dependent or independent of their button press. They were specifically instructed to reproduce the standard duration as accurately as possible by pressing down the button, regardless of the feedback signals (see the detail instruction in the “Appendix”). To distinguish and counter-balance the standard and feedback stimuli, half of the participants received high tones (or red lights) as standard stimuli and low tones (or blue lights) as the ± feedback stimuli, and vice versa for the other half.

Bottom Line: However, whether and how sensorimotor delay affects duration reproduction is still unclear.These findings indicate that participants tend to mix the onset of action and the feedback signal more when the feedback is delayed, and they heavily rely on motor-stop signals for the duration reproduction.Furthermore, auditory duration was overestimated compared to visual duration in crossmodal feedback conditions, and the overestimation of auditory duration (or the underestimation of visual duration) was independent of the delay manipulation.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department Psychology, General and Experimental Psychology LMU Munich, Germany ; Graduate School of Systemic Neuroscience LMU Munich, Germany.

ABSTRACT
Previous research has shown that voluntary action can attract subsequent, delayed feedback events toward the action, and adaptation to the sensorimotor delay can even reverse motor-sensory temporal order judgments. However, whether and how sensorimotor delay affects duration reproduction is still unclear. To investigate this, we injected an onset- or offset-delay to the sensory feedback signal from a duration reproduction task. We compared duration reproductions within (visual, auditory) modality and across audiovisual modalities with feedback signal onset- and offset-delay manipulations. We found that the reproduced duration was lengthened in both visual and auditory feedback signal onset-delay conditions. The lengthening effect was evident immediately, on the first trial with the onset-delay. However, when the onset of the feedback signal was prior to the action, the lengthening effect was diminished. In contrast, a shortening effect was found with feedback signal offset-delay, though the effect was weaker and manifested only in the auditory offset-delay condition. These findings indicate that participants tend to mix the onset of action and the feedback signal more when the feedback is delayed, and they heavily rely on motor-stop signals for the duration reproduction. Furthermore, auditory duration was overestimated compared to visual duration in crossmodal feedback conditions, and the overestimation of auditory duration (or the underestimation of visual duration) was independent of the delay manipulation.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus