Limits...
Renal tumors and second primary pancreatic tumors: a relationship with clinical impact?

Müller SA, Pahernik S, Hinz U, Martin DJ, Wente MN, Hackert T, Leowardi C, Haferkamp A, Büchler MW, Schmied BM - Patient Saf Surg (2012)

Bottom Line: The occurrence of synchronous or metachronous renal cell carcinoma and pancreatic tumors has been described only in a few cases in the scientific literature.The study of double primary cancers is important because it might provide understanding of a shared genetic basis of different solid tumors and to detect patients at risk for secondary malignancy.The association between these two etiologies of malignancy demands more detailed epidemiological and molecular investigation.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of General, Visceral and Transplant Surgery, University of Heidelberg, Heidelberg, Germany. bruno.schmied@kssg.ch.

ABSTRACT

Background: The occurrence of synchronous or metachronous renal cell carcinoma and pancreatic tumors has been described only in a few cases in the scientific literature. The study of double primary cancers is important because it might provide understanding of a shared genetic basis of different solid tumors and to detect patients at risk for secondary malignancy.

Methods: In a combined analysis of patient registries from University Departments of Urology and Visceral Surgery, 1178 patients with pancreatic tumors and 518 patients with renal cell carcinoma treated between 2001 and 2008 were evaluated,

Results: Overall 16 patients with renal cancer and synchronous (n = 6) or metachronous (n = 10) primary pancreatic tumors were detected. The median survival of all patients was 12.6 months, for the patients with synchronous resections 25.7 months and for the patients with metachronous resections 12.2 months, respectively.

Conclusions: The association between these two etiologies of malignancy demands more detailed epidemiological and molecular investigation. Clinical outcomes would support a resection as a recommended clinically valid option.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Overall survival of synchronous versus metachronous pancreatic tumor resection.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3472300&req=5

Figure 2: Overall survival of synchronous versus metachronous pancreatic tumor resection.

Mentions: The median follow-up duration was 12.6 months with a range of 1.5-35 months. During the follow-up period 11 patients died because of either pancreatic cancer or its recurrence, whereas no patient died due to recurrent RCC. Five patients are alive at present time. Figure 1 shows the comparison of the median survival rates between the patients treated for RCC alone (n = 518), the corresponding pancreatic tumor cohort (n = 1178) with either PDAC or IPMN and the 16 patients with double primary tumors (p < 0.0001). Although lacking statistical significance, synchronous resection had a longer median survival of 25.7 months compared to metachronous resection (12.2 months) (p = 0.49; Figure 2).


Renal tumors and second primary pancreatic tumors: a relationship with clinical impact?

Müller SA, Pahernik S, Hinz U, Martin DJ, Wente MN, Hackert T, Leowardi C, Haferkamp A, Büchler MW, Schmied BM - Patient Saf Surg (2012)

Overall survival of synchronous versus metachronous pancreatic tumor resection.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3472300&req=5

Figure 2: Overall survival of synchronous versus metachronous pancreatic tumor resection.
Mentions: The median follow-up duration was 12.6 months with a range of 1.5-35 months. During the follow-up period 11 patients died because of either pancreatic cancer or its recurrence, whereas no patient died due to recurrent RCC. Five patients are alive at present time. Figure 1 shows the comparison of the median survival rates between the patients treated for RCC alone (n = 518), the corresponding pancreatic tumor cohort (n = 1178) with either PDAC or IPMN and the 16 patients with double primary tumors (p < 0.0001). Although lacking statistical significance, synchronous resection had a longer median survival of 25.7 months compared to metachronous resection (12.2 months) (p = 0.49; Figure 2).

Bottom Line: The occurrence of synchronous or metachronous renal cell carcinoma and pancreatic tumors has been described only in a few cases in the scientific literature.The study of double primary cancers is important because it might provide understanding of a shared genetic basis of different solid tumors and to detect patients at risk for secondary malignancy.The association between these two etiologies of malignancy demands more detailed epidemiological and molecular investigation.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of General, Visceral and Transplant Surgery, University of Heidelberg, Heidelberg, Germany. bruno.schmied@kssg.ch.

ABSTRACT

Background: The occurrence of synchronous or metachronous renal cell carcinoma and pancreatic tumors has been described only in a few cases in the scientific literature. The study of double primary cancers is important because it might provide understanding of a shared genetic basis of different solid tumors and to detect patients at risk for secondary malignancy.

Methods: In a combined analysis of patient registries from University Departments of Urology and Visceral Surgery, 1178 patients with pancreatic tumors and 518 patients with renal cell carcinoma treated between 2001 and 2008 were evaluated,

Results: Overall 16 patients with renal cancer and synchronous (n = 6) or metachronous (n = 10) primary pancreatic tumors were detected. The median survival of all patients was 12.6 months, for the patients with synchronous resections 25.7 months and for the patients with metachronous resections 12.2 months, respectively.

Conclusions: The association between these two etiologies of malignancy demands more detailed epidemiological and molecular investigation. Clinical outcomes would support a resection as a recommended clinically valid option.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus