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A comparison of occupational and non-occupational exposure to diesel exhausts and its consequences for studying health effects.

Järvholm B, Reuterwall C - Occup Environ Med (2012)

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We used nitrous dioxide as a marker of diesel exhausts and estimated exposure during working time (1700 h/year), time in city for commuting and so on (700 h/year) and to the average concentration in the city (‘city background’; 6360 h/year)... The average concentration in the city streets was 15 µg/m and the city background 8 µg/m... There have been some measurements on bus, truck and taxi drivers in the Stockholm area, indicating an average concentration of 53 µg/m, indicating an occupational contribution of 29% in drivers (figure 1)... These are the occupational contributions of diesel exhausts during a year in which the worker is occupationally active... If the life-time cumulative exposure would be estimated the occupational contribution would decrease considerably... The recent US study of miners found an average concentration of 128 µg/m elementary carbon in underground workers while the concentration for surface worker was only 1.7 µg/m... However, if the lung cancer risk at the age of 70 is proportional to the life-time cumulative risk, the occupational contribution would be just about 50% for a worker who had worked 5 years underground in the mine and 70% if he had worked underground for 10 years... We conclude that occupational studies of the risk with diesel exhausts would considerably underestimate the risk if they do not consider the non-occupational exposure... This especially concerns studies of modestly exposed groups like drivers in non-confined spaces.

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Contribution of cumulative exposure to NO2 (hours×µg/m3) during a year from different sources.
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OEMED20122101134F1: Contribution of cumulative exposure to NO2 (hours×µg/m3) during a year from different sources.

Mentions: Iron miners in Kiruna had an average concentration of 280 µg/m35 during work in the mine. The average concentration in the city streets was 15 µg/m3 and the city background 8 µg/m3. Thus, the cumulative exposure was 5.4×105 h×µg/m3 (1700×280+700×15+6360×8=537 380) of which the occupational exposure constituted 89%. The concentration for tunnel workers in the Stockholm area was reported to 350 µg/m3,6 the concentrations for a busy street 38 (average of a street 2005–2010) and city background 18 µg/m3 (average of two sites 2010). Thus, the occupational exposure constituted 81% for the tunnel workers assuming that they worked all their working time in the tunnel. There have been some measurements on bus, truck and taxi drivers in the Stockholm area, indicating an average concentration of 53 µg/m3,6 indicating an occupational contribution of 29% in drivers (figure 1).


A comparison of occupational and non-occupational exposure to diesel exhausts and its consequences for studying health effects.

Järvholm B, Reuterwall C - Occup Environ Med (2012)

Contribution of cumulative exposure to NO2 (hours×µg/m3) during a year from different sources.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3472232&req=5

OEMED20122101134F1: Contribution of cumulative exposure to NO2 (hours×µg/m3) during a year from different sources.
Mentions: Iron miners in Kiruna had an average concentration of 280 µg/m35 during work in the mine. The average concentration in the city streets was 15 µg/m3 and the city background 8 µg/m3. Thus, the cumulative exposure was 5.4×105 h×µg/m3 (1700×280+700×15+6360×8=537 380) of which the occupational exposure constituted 89%. The concentration for tunnel workers in the Stockholm area was reported to 350 µg/m3,6 the concentrations for a busy street 38 (average of a street 2005–2010) and city background 18 µg/m3 (average of two sites 2010). Thus, the occupational exposure constituted 81% for the tunnel workers assuming that they worked all their working time in the tunnel. There have been some measurements on bus, truck and taxi drivers in the Stockholm area, indicating an average concentration of 53 µg/m3,6 indicating an occupational contribution of 29% in drivers (figure 1).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

AUTOMATICALLY GENERATED EXCERPT
Please rate it.

We used nitrous dioxide as a marker of diesel exhausts and estimated exposure during working time (1700 h/year), time in city for commuting and so on (700 h/year) and to the average concentration in the city (‘city background’; 6360 h/year)... The average concentration in the city streets was 15 µg/m and the city background 8 µg/m... There have been some measurements on bus, truck and taxi drivers in the Stockholm area, indicating an average concentration of 53 µg/m, indicating an occupational contribution of 29% in drivers (figure 1)... These are the occupational contributions of diesel exhausts during a year in which the worker is occupationally active... If the life-time cumulative exposure would be estimated the occupational contribution would decrease considerably... The recent US study of miners found an average concentration of 128 µg/m elementary carbon in underground workers while the concentration for surface worker was only 1.7 µg/m... However, if the lung cancer risk at the age of 70 is proportional to the life-time cumulative risk, the occupational contribution would be just about 50% for a worker who had worked 5 years underground in the mine and 70% if he had worked underground for 10 years... We conclude that occupational studies of the risk with diesel exhausts would considerably underestimate the risk if they do not consider the non-occupational exposure... This especially concerns studies of modestly exposed groups like drivers in non-confined spaces.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus