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Bilateral absence of musculocutaneous nerve with unusual branching pattern of lateral cord and median nerve of brachial plexus.

Bhanu PS, Sankar KD - Anat Cell Biol (2012)

Bottom Line: The median nerve, after supplying the biceps and brachialis muscles, gave onto the lateral cutaneous nerve of the forearm.The median nerve also showed variation on the left side where it was formed by two lateral roots and one medial root.Variations of the brachial plexus are of great interest to anatomists, clinicians and surgeons, in that they may be incorporated in their day to day practice.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Anatomy, Narayana Medical College, Nellore, Andhra Pradesh, India.

ABSTRACT
A 43-year-old female cadaver showed a complete bilateral absence of the musculocutaneous nerve. The anterior compartment muscles of both arms were supplied by median nerve excepting the coracobrachialis which was innervated by a direct branch from the lateral cord of brachial plexus. The median nerve, after supplying the biceps and brachialis muscles, gave onto the lateral cutaneous nerve of the forearm. The median nerve also showed variation on the left side where it was formed by two lateral roots and one medial root. Variations of the brachial plexus are of great interest to anatomists, clinicians and surgeons, in that they may be incorporated in their day to day practice. Our present case may be noted for its clinical and surgical significance in the variations of brachial plexus which can be useful for diagnostic purposes.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Photograph showing the variant branches of median nerve on the left side. BBr, biceps brachii; CTMCAF, common trunk for medial cutaneous nerve of arm and forearm from medial cord; MCNA, medial cutaneous nerve of arm; MCNF, medial cutaneous nerve of forearm; MN, median nerve; UN, ulnar nerve; arrow, single long trunk from MN; 1, nerve to biceps brachii; 2, branch to brachialis; 3, lateral cutaneous nerve of forearm.
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Figure 4: Photograph showing the variant branches of median nerve on the left side. BBr, biceps brachii; CTMCAF, common trunk for medial cutaneous nerve of arm and forearm from medial cord; MCNA, medial cutaneous nerve of arm; MCNF, medial cutaneous nerve of forearm; MN, median nerve; UN, ulnar nerve; arrow, single long trunk from MN; 1, nerve to biceps brachii; 2, branch to brachialis; 3, lateral cutaneous nerve of forearm.

Mentions: The MN was formed by two lateral roots from the lateral cord and one from medial root from the medial cord. After the formation, the left MN had the same course as the right side. During its course between the biceps brachii and brachialis, the MN split off a single long branch from which branches to the biceps brachii and brachialis were derived. After supplying these two muscles it continued as LCNF, which supplied the lateral side of the skin of forearm. The medial cutaneous nerve of arm and forearm arose from a common trunk, and separated in the middle of the arm, similarly to the right side (Fig. 4).


Bilateral absence of musculocutaneous nerve with unusual branching pattern of lateral cord and median nerve of brachial plexus.

Bhanu PS, Sankar KD - Anat Cell Biol (2012)

Photograph showing the variant branches of median nerve on the left side. BBr, biceps brachii; CTMCAF, common trunk for medial cutaneous nerve of arm and forearm from medial cord; MCNA, medial cutaneous nerve of arm; MCNF, medial cutaneous nerve of forearm; MN, median nerve; UN, ulnar nerve; arrow, single long trunk from MN; 1, nerve to biceps brachii; 2, branch to brachialis; 3, lateral cutaneous nerve of forearm.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3472148&req=5

Figure 4: Photograph showing the variant branches of median nerve on the left side. BBr, biceps brachii; CTMCAF, common trunk for medial cutaneous nerve of arm and forearm from medial cord; MCNA, medial cutaneous nerve of arm; MCNF, medial cutaneous nerve of forearm; MN, median nerve; UN, ulnar nerve; arrow, single long trunk from MN; 1, nerve to biceps brachii; 2, branch to brachialis; 3, lateral cutaneous nerve of forearm.
Mentions: The MN was formed by two lateral roots from the lateral cord and one from medial root from the medial cord. After the formation, the left MN had the same course as the right side. During its course between the biceps brachii and brachialis, the MN split off a single long branch from which branches to the biceps brachii and brachialis were derived. After supplying these two muscles it continued as LCNF, which supplied the lateral side of the skin of forearm. The medial cutaneous nerve of arm and forearm arose from a common trunk, and separated in the middle of the arm, similarly to the right side (Fig. 4).

Bottom Line: The median nerve, after supplying the biceps and brachialis muscles, gave onto the lateral cutaneous nerve of the forearm.The median nerve also showed variation on the left side where it was formed by two lateral roots and one medial root.Variations of the brachial plexus are of great interest to anatomists, clinicians and surgeons, in that they may be incorporated in their day to day practice.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Anatomy, Narayana Medical College, Nellore, Andhra Pradesh, India.

ABSTRACT
A 43-year-old female cadaver showed a complete bilateral absence of the musculocutaneous nerve. The anterior compartment muscles of both arms were supplied by median nerve excepting the coracobrachialis which was innervated by a direct branch from the lateral cord of brachial plexus. The median nerve, after supplying the biceps and brachialis muscles, gave onto the lateral cutaneous nerve of the forearm. The median nerve also showed variation on the left side where it was formed by two lateral roots and one medial root. Variations of the brachial plexus are of great interest to anatomists, clinicians and surgeons, in that they may be incorporated in their day to day practice. Our present case may be noted for its clinical and surgical significance in the variations of brachial plexus which can be useful for diagnostic purposes.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus