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Stepping stones in DNA sequencing.

Stranneheim H, Lundeberg J - Biotechnol J (2012)

Bottom Line: In recent years there have been tremendous advances in our ability to rapidly and cost-effectively sequence DNA.However, recent announcements in nanopore sequencing hold the promise of removing this read-length limitation, enabling sequencing of larger intact DNA fragments.This review covers some of the technical advances in sequencing that have opened up new frontiers in genomics.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Science for Life Laboratory, KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm, Sweden. henrik.stranneheim@scilifelab.se

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(A) Comparison of number of DNA molecules required for generating a base call in consensus sequencing and single-molecule sequencing. (B) The most common type of sequencing errors per sequencing technology.
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fig02: (A) Comparison of number of DNA molecules required for generating a base call in consensus sequencing and single-molecule sequencing. (B) The most common type of sequencing errors per sequencing technology.

Mentions: Massively parallel consensus sequencing has become the dominant sequencing technology, but other approaches have emerged that avoid amplification of the DNA template prior to sequencing. The aim of these technologies is to sequence single DNA molecules, preferably in real time. Potential benefits of using single-molecule sequencing are: the minimal quantities of input DNA required; elimination of amplification bias; asynchronous synthesis; fast turnaround times; and the capacity to investigate the characteristics of individual DNA molecules. A comparison of consensus and single-molecule sequencing, as well as the most common errors for each sequencing technology is shown in Fig. 2.


Stepping stones in DNA sequencing.

Stranneheim H, Lundeberg J - Biotechnol J (2012)

(A) Comparison of number of DNA molecules required for generating a base call in consensus sequencing and single-molecule sequencing. (B) The most common type of sequencing errors per sequencing technology.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3472021&req=5

fig02: (A) Comparison of number of DNA molecules required for generating a base call in consensus sequencing and single-molecule sequencing. (B) The most common type of sequencing errors per sequencing technology.
Mentions: Massively parallel consensus sequencing has become the dominant sequencing technology, but other approaches have emerged that avoid amplification of the DNA template prior to sequencing. The aim of these technologies is to sequence single DNA molecules, preferably in real time. Potential benefits of using single-molecule sequencing are: the minimal quantities of input DNA required; elimination of amplification bias; asynchronous synthesis; fast turnaround times; and the capacity to investigate the characteristics of individual DNA molecules. A comparison of consensus and single-molecule sequencing, as well as the most common errors for each sequencing technology is shown in Fig. 2.

Bottom Line: In recent years there have been tremendous advances in our ability to rapidly and cost-effectively sequence DNA.However, recent announcements in nanopore sequencing hold the promise of removing this read-length limitation, enabling sequencing of larger intact DNA fragments.This review covers some of the technical advances in sequencing that have opened up new frontiers in genomics.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Science for Life Laboratory, KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm, Sweden. henrik.stranneheim@scilifelab.se

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus