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Novice medical students: individual patterns in the use of learning strategies and how they change during the first academic year.

Fabry G, Giesler M - GMS Z Med Ausbild (2012)

Bottom Line: The actual use of learning strategies is the result of an interaction between individual and situational variables.Students start their academic studies with different patterns of learning strategies; the characteristics of these patterns change during the first academic year.Further research is necessary to better understand how individual and situational variables determine students' learning.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Albert-Ludwigs-Universität Freiburg, Medizinische Fakultät, Abteilung für Medizinische Psychologie und Soziologie, Freiburg, Deutschland. goetz.fabry@klinikum.uni-freiburg.de

ABSTRACT

Background: Adequate use of different learning strategies is one of the most important prerequisites of academic success. The actual use of learning strategies is the result of an interaction between individual and situational variables. Against this background we conducted a longitudinal study with first year medical students to investigate whether individuals show different patterns in their use of learning strategies and whether these patterns change during the first academic year.

Methods: Medical students (N=175, 58% female) were surveyed three times in their first academic year regarding their use of learning strategies. A hierarchical cluster analysis (Ward) was conducted in order to identify groups of students with different patterns of learning strategies.

Results: We identified four different patterns in approaches to learning among novice medical students ("easy-going", "flexible", "problematic" and "hardworking" learners). Compared to their peers, the problematic learners had the worst final school grades. In addition changes in the use of learning strategies were identified, most of them occurred during the first term.

Conclusion: Students start their academic studies with different patterns of learning strategies; the characteristics of these patterns change during the first academic year. Further research is necessary to better understand how individual and situational variables determine students' learning.

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Repeated measures analyses of variance for learning strategies by cluster membership (CL) and time of assessment (T, T1=first week of study, T2=end of the first half year, T3=end of the first year)
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T4: Repeated measures analyses of variance for learning strategies by cluster membership (CL) and time of assessment (T, T1=first week of study, T2=end of the first half year, T3=end of the first year)

Mentions: To answer our second research question we looked for changes in the use of learning strategies over the course of time. In a first step we analysed the data of the whole cohort (see Table 4 (Tab. 4)), in a second step we further analysed the data of each cluster individually. Eight significant time effects for learning strategies were identified (see Table 4 (Tab. 4)). Additional analyses (paired t-tests) showed that the majority of changes took place between T1 and T2 (i.e. students’ first term tOrg(167)=3.85, p<.001, tCritR(170)=3.32, p<.01, tMetaC(169)=4.94, p<.001, tEffort(172)=5.26, p<.001, tDistract=-2.40, p<.05, tTimeM(173)=-4.53, p<.001, tLit (173)=9.34, p<.001, tLCol(172)=2.38, p<.05). The largest effect for time was found for the use of additional literature (η2part=.37). The means for distractibility (having difficulties with keeping track of the learning task at hand) and for using of time management strategies increased, while the use of the other strategies which are subject to change decreased. Further decreases occured between T2 and T3 namely with regard to critical review (tCritR(164)=4.83, p<.001), use of additional literature (tLit(172)=2.01, p<.001) and learning with colleagues (tLCol(171)=2.47, p<.05).


Novice medical students: individual patterns in the use of learning strategies and how they change during the first academic year.

Fabry G, Giesler M - GMS Z Med Ausbild (2012)

Repeated measures analyses of variance for learning strategies by cluster membership (CL) and time of assessment (T, T1=first week of study, T2=end of the first half year, T3=end of the first year)
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3420118&req=5

T4: Repeated measures analyses of variance for learning strategies by cluster membership (CL) and time of assessment (T, T1=first week of study, T2=end of the first half year, T3=end of the first year)
Mentions: To answer our second research question we looked for changes in the use of learning strategies over the course of time. In a first step we analysed the data of the whole cohort (see Table 4 (Tab. 4)), in a second step we further analysed the data of each cluster individually. Eight significant time effects for learning strategies were identified (see Table 4 (Tab. 4)). Additional analyses (paired t-tests) showed that the majority of changes took place between T1 and T2 (i.e. students’ first term tOrg(167)=3.85, p<.001, tCritR(170)=3.32, p<.01, tMetaC(169)=4.94, p<.001, tEffort(172)=5.26, p<.001, tDistract=-2.40, p<.05, tTimeM(173)=-4.53, p<.001, tLit (173)=9.34, p<.001, tLCol(172)=2.38, p<.05). The largest effect for time was found for the use of additional literature (η2part=.37). The means for distractibility (having difficulties with keeping track of the learning task at hand) and for using of time management strategies increased, while the use of the other strategies which are subject to change decreased. Further decreases occured between T2 and T3 namely with regard to critical review (tCritR(164)=4.83, p<.001), use of additional literature (tLit(172)=2.01, p<.001) and learning with colleagues (tLCol(171)=2.47, p<.05).

Bottom Line: The actual use of learning strategies is the result of an interaction between individual and situational variables.Students start their academic studies with different patterns of learning strategies; the characteristics of these patterns change during the first academic year.Further research is necessary to better understand how individual and situational variables determine students' learning.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Albert-Ludwigs-Universität Freiburg, Medizinische Fakultät, Abteilung für Medizinische Psychologie und Soziologie, Freiburg, Deutschland. goetz.fabry@klinikum.uni-freiburg.de

ABSTRACT

Background: Adequate use of different learning strategies is one of the most important prerequisites of academic success. The actual use of learning strategies is the result of an interaction between individual and situational variables. Against this background we conducted a longitudinal study with first year medical students to investigate whether individuals show different patterns in their use of learning strategies and whether these patterns change during the first academic year.

Methods: Medical students (N=175, 58% female) were surveyed three times in their first academic year regarding their use of learning strategies. A hierarchical cluster analysis (Ward) was conducted in order to identify groups of students with different patterns of learning strategies.

Results: We identified four different patterns in approaches to learning among novice medical students ("easy-going", "flexible", "problematic" and "hardworking" learners). Compared to their peers, the problematic learners had the worst final school grades. In addition changes in the use of learning strategies were identified, most of them occurred during the first term.

Conclusion: Students start their academic studies with different patterns of learning strategies; the characteristics of these patterns change during the first academic year. Further research is necessary to better understand how individual and situational variables determine students' learning.

Show MeSH