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Evolution of the FGF Gene Family.

Oulion S, Bertrand S, Escriva H - Int J Evol Biol (2012)

Bottom Line: Efforts have been previously made to decipher the evolutionary history of this family but conclusions were limited due to a poor taxonomic coverage.We took advantage of the availability of many new sequences from diverse metazoan lineages to further explore the possible evolutionary scenarios explaining the diversity of the FGF gene family.Our analyses, based on phylogenetics and synteny conservation approaches, allow us to propose a new classification of FGF genes into eight subfamilies, and to draw hypotheses for the evolutionary events leading to the present diversity of this gene family.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: CNRS, UMR 7232, BIOM, Université Pierre et Marie Curie Paris 06, Observatoire Océanologique, 66650 Banyuls-sur-Mer, France.

ABSTRACT
Fibroblast Growth Factors (FGFs) are small proteins generally secreted, acting through binding to transmembrane tyrosine kinase receptors (FGFRs). Activation of FGFRs triggers several cytoplasmic cascades leading to the modification of cell behavior. FGFs play critical roles in a variety of developmental and physiological processes. Since their discovery in mammals, FGFs have been found in many metazoans and some arthropod viruses. Efforts have been previously made to decipher the evolutionary history of this family but conclusions were limited due to a poor taxonomic coverage. We took advantage of the availability of many new sequences from diverse metazoan lineages to further explore the possible evolutionary scenarios explaining the diversity of the FGF gene family. Our analyses, based on phylogenetics and synteny conservation approaches, allow us to propose a new classification of FGF genes into eight subfamilies, and to draw hypotheses for the evolutionary events leading to the present diversity of this gene family.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

FGF gene content in chordates. Each of the eight FGF paralogy groups is represented by one color. Gene losses are indicated under the tree branches and specific teleost duplications are outlined in red. The urochordate FGFL which is considered as a specific duplication of FGF7/10/22 in this group is colored in dark green. Blue stars represent genome duplications.
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fig4: FGF gene content in chordates. Each of the eight FGF paralogy groups is represented by one color. Gene losses are indicated under the tree branches and specific teleost duplications are outlined in red. The urochordate FGFL which is considered as a specific duplication of FGF7/10/22 in this group is colored in dark green. Blue stars represent genome duplications.

Mentions: Phylogenetic reconstructions using FGF sequences from all metazoan phyla often fail to completely solve the orthology relationship between the different members of this family mainly because of the reduced size of the FGF domain and because of the high divergence of the sequences between the different lineages. However, using the phylogenetic distribution of FGF genes into eight subfamilies, we can propose evolutionary scenarios accounting for the FGF gene content found in the different metazoan lineages. Several hypotheses can be drawn explaining such a distribution of FGF orthologs. Here we focus mainly on two of these hypotheses: a first hypothesis where the eight FGF subfamilies are chordate-specific (Figures 4 and 5, hypothesis 1) and a second hypothesis where the eight subfamilies were ancestral to all eumetazoans (Figure 5, hypothesis 2). In both hypotheses, the evolutionary history of the FGF gene content in chordates is the same (Figure 4), but depending on the hypothesis, it changes for the other metazoan lineages (Figure 5).


Evolution of the FGF Gene Family.

Oulion S, Bertrand S, Escriva H - Int J Evol Biol (2012)

FGF gene content in chordates. Each of the eight FGF paralogy groups is represented by one color. Gene losses are indicated under the tree branches and specific teleost duplications are outlined in red. The urochordate FGFL which is considered as a specific duplication of FGF7/10/22 in this group is colored in dark green. Blue stars represent genome duplications.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

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getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3420111&req=5

fig4: FGF gene content in chordates. Each of the eight FGF paralogy groups is represented by one color. Gene losses are indicated under the tree branches and specific teleost duplications are outlined in red. The urochordate FGFL which is considered as a specific duplication of FGF7/10/22 in this group is colored in dark green. Blue stars represent genome duplications.
Mentions: Phylogenetic reconstructions using FGF sequences from all metazoan phyla often fail to completely solve the orthology relationship between the different members of this family mainly because of the reduced size of the FGF domain and because of the high divergence of the sequences between the different lineages. However, using the phylogenetic distribution of FGF genes into eight subfamilies, we can propose evolutionary scenarios accounting for the FGF gene content found in the different metazoan lineages. Several hypotheses can be drawn explaining such a distribution of FGF orthologs. Here we focus mainly on two of these hypotheses: a first hypothesis where the eight FGF subfamilies are chordate-specific (Figures 4 and 5, hypothesis 1) and a second hypothesis where the eight subfamilies were ancestral to all eumetazoans (Figure 5, hypothesis 2). In both hypotheses, the evolutionary history of the FGF gene content in chordates is the same (Figure 4), but depending on the hypothesis, it changes for the other metazoan lineages (Figure 5).

Bottom Line: Efforts have been previously made to decipher the evolutionary history of this family but conclusions were limited due to a poor taxonomic coverage.We took advantage of the availability of many new sequences from diverse metazoan lineages to further explore the possible evolutionary scenarios explaining the diversity of the FGF gene family.Our analyses, based on phylogenetics and synteny conservation approaches, allow us to propose a new classification of FGF genes into eight subfamilies, and to draw hypotheses for the evolutionary events leading to the present diversity of this gene family.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: CNRS, UMR 7232, BIOM, Université Pierre et Marie Curie Paris 06, Observatoire Océanologique, 66650 Banyuls-sur-Mer, France.

ABSTRACT
Fibroblast Growth Factors (FGFs) are small proteins generally secreted, acting through binding to transmembrane tyrosine kinase receptors (FGFRs). Activation of FGFRs triggers several cytoplasmic cascades leading to the modification of cell behavior. FGFs play critical roles in a variety of developmental and physiological processes. Since their discovery in mammals, FGFs have been found in many metazoans and some arthropod viruses. Efforts have been previously made to decipher the evolutionary history of this family but conclusions were limited due to a poor taxonomic coverage. We took advantage of the availability of many new sequences from diverse metazoan lineages to further explore the possible evolutionary scenarios explaining the diversity of the FGF gene family. Our analyses, based on phylogenetics and synteny conservation approaches, allow us to propose a new classification of FGF genes into eight subfamilies, and to draw hypotheses for the evolutionary events leading to the present diversity of this gene family.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus