Limits...
Hyperemia-Related Changes in Arterial Stiffness: Comparison between Pulse Wave Velocity and Stiffness Index in the Vascular Reactivity Assessment.

Torrado J, Bia D, Zócalo Y, Farro I, Farro F, Armentano RL - Int J Vasc Med (2012)

Bottom Line: This study assessed the effects of hyperemia on SI and compared it with PWV(cr) in 14 healthy subjects.Conclusion.Hyperemia significantly decreases SI in healthy subjects.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Physiology Department, School of Medicine, Centro Universitario de Investigación, Innovación y Diagnóstico Arterial (CUiiDARTE), Republic University, General Flores 2125, 11800 Montevideo, Uruguay.

ABSTRACT
Carotid-to-radial pulse wave velocity (PWV(cr)) has been proposed to evaluate endothelial function. However, the measurement of PWV(cr) is not without limitations. A new simple approach could have wide application. Stiffness index (SI) is obtained by analysis of the peripheral pulse wave and gives reproducible information about stiffness of large arteries. This study assessed the effects of hyperemia on SI and compared it with PWV(cr) in 14 healthy subjects. Both were measured at rest and during 8 minutes after ischemia. SI temporal course was determined. At 1 minute, SI and PWV(cr) decreased (5.58 ± 0.24 to 5.34 ± 0.23 m/s, P < 0.05; 7.8 ± 1.0 to 7.2 ± 0.9 m/s; P < 0.05, resp.). SI was positively related to PWV(cr) in baseline (r = 0.62 , P < 0.05), at 1 minute (r = 0.79, P < 0.05), and during the whole experimental session (r = 0.52, P < 0.05). Conclusion. Hyperemia significantly decreases SI in healthy subjects. SI was related to PWV(cr) and could be used to facilitate the evaluation of hyperemia-related changes in arterial stiffness.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

MV and SEM of SI temporal pattern measured at rest (baseline) and 8 minutes after cuff deflation. *indicates significance (P < 0.05) comparing baseline to one minute after cuff deflation.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection


getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3420106&req=5

fig4: MV and SEM of SI temporal pattern measured at rest (baseline) and 8 minutes after cuff deflation. *indicates significance (P < 0.05) comparing baseline to one minute after cuff deflation.

Mentions: Figure 4 shows basal SI levels and its temporal profile after cuff deflation. As can be seen, the maximal SI change (4.3%) was observed one minute after cuff deflation (5.58 ± 0.24 to 5.34 ± 0.23 m/s; P < 0.05). Thereafter, SI values showed a recovery trend, without reaching basal levels. Typical pulse wave traces obtained during basal conditions and one minute after cuff deflation are depicted in Figure 5. In Table 2 are shown the delays of the radial pulse pressure waveform. As it can be seen, the major change due to RH/transient ischemia was obtained in the time delay between foot and second (diastolic) peak of the radial pulse.


Hyperemia-Related Changes in Arterial Stiffness: Comparison between Pulse Wave Velocity and Stiffness Index in the Vascular Reactivity Assessment.

Torrado J, Bia D, Zócalo Y, Farro I, Farro F, Armentano RL - Int J Vasc Med (2012)

MV and SEM of SI temporal pattern measured at rest (baseline) and 8 minutes after cuff deflation. *indicates significance (P < 0.05) comparing baseline to one minute after cuff deflation.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3420106&req=5

fig4: MV and SEM of SI temporal pattern measured at rest (baseline) and 8 minutes after cuff deflation. *indicates significance (P < 0.05) comparing baseline to one minute after cuff deflation.
Mentions: Figure 4 shows basal SI levels and its temporal profile after cuff deflation. As can be seen, the maximal SI change (4.3%) was observed one minute after cuff deflation (5.58 ± 0.24 to 5.34 ± 0.23 m/s; P < 0.05). Thereafter, SI values showed a recovery trend, without reaching basal levels. Typical pulse wave traces obtained during basal conditions and one minute after cuff deflation are depicted in Figure 5. In Table 2 are shown the delays of the radial pulse pressure waveform. As it can be seen, the major change due to RH/transient ischemia was obtained in the time delay between foot and second (diastolic) peak of the radial pulse.

Bottom Line: This study assessed the effects of hyperemia on SI and compared it with PWV(cr) in 14 healthy subjects.Conclusion.Hyperemia significantly decreases SI in healthy subjects.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Physiology Department, School of Medicine, Centro Universitario de Investigación, Innovación y Diagnóstico Arterial (CUiiDARTE), Republic University, General Flores 2125, 11800 Montevideo, Uruguay.

ABSTRACT
Carotid-to-radial pulse wave velocity (PWV(cr)) has been proposed to evaluate endothelial function. However, the measurement of PWV(cr) is not without limitations. A new simple approach could have wide application. Stiffness index (SI) is obtained by analysis of the peripheral pulse wave and gives reproducible information about stiffness of large arteries. This study assessed the effects of hyperemia on SI and compared it with PWV(cr) in 14 healthy subjects. Both were measured at rest and during 8 minutes after ischemia. SI temporal course was determined. At 1 minute, SI and PWV(cr) decreased (5.58 ± 0.24 to 5.34 ± 0.23 m/s, P < 0.05; 7.8 ± 1.0 to 7.2 ± 0.9 m/s; P < 0.05, resp.). SI was positively related to PWV(cr) in baseline (r = 0.62 , P < 0.05), at 1 minute (r = 0.79, P < 0.05), and during the whole experimental session (r = 0.52, P < 0.05). Conclusion. Hyperemia significantly decreases SI in healthy subjects. SI was related to PWV(cr) and could be used to facilitate the evaluation of hyperemia-related changes in arterial stiffness.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus