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Quantitative analysis of cancer-associated gene methylation connected to risk factors in Korean colorectal cancer patients.

Kang HJ, Kim EJ, Kim BG, You CH, Lee SY, Kim DI, Hong YS - J Prev Med Public Health (2012)

Bottom Line: The hypermethylation of TIMP3, E-cadherin, ABCB1, and COX2 genes among other genes were abundantly found in normal colorectal tissues.In Cohen's kappa test, it was moderately observed that RASSF1 was related with E-cadherin, and Smad4 with ABCB1 and COX2.This study provides evidence for different hypermethylation patterns of cancer-associated genes in normal and CRC tissues, which may serve as useful information on CRC cancer progression.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Preventive Medicine, Dong-A University College of Medicine, Busan, Korea.

ABSTRACT

Objectives: The purpose of this paper was to elucidate the potential methylation levels of adjacent normal and cancer tissues by comparing them with normal colorectal tissues, and to describe the correlations between the methylation and clinical parameters in Korean colorectal cancer (CRC) patients.

Methods: Hypermethylation profiles of nine genes (RASSF1, APC, p16(INK4a), Twist1, E-cadherin, TIMP3, Smad4, COX2, and ABCB1) were examined with 100 sets of cancer tissues and 14 normal colorectal tissues. We determined the hypermethylation at a given level by a percent of methylation ratio value of 10 using quantitative methylation real-time polymerase chain reaction.

Results: Nine genes' hypermethylation levels in Korean CRC patient tissues were increased more higher than normal colorectal tissues. However, the amounts of p16(INK4a) and E-cadherin gene hypermethylation in normal and CRC tissues were not significantly different nor did TIMP3 gene hypermethylation in adjacent normal and cancer tissues differ significantly. The hypermethylation of TIMP3, E-cadherin, ABCB1, and COX2 genes among other genes were abundantly found in normal colorectal tissues. The hypermethylation of nine genes' methylation in cancer tissues was not significantly associated with any clinical parameters. In Cohen's kappa test, it was moderately observed that RASSF1 was related with E-cadherin, and Smad4 with ABCB1 and COX2.

Conclusions: This study provides evidence for different hypermethylation patterns of cancer-associated genes in normal and CRC tissues, which may serve as useful information on CRC cancer progression.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Percentage of methylation ratio (PMR) contains nine cancer-associated genes in colorectal cancer patients. Promoter methylation of nine tumor-association genes in tumor tissues and corresponding adjacent normal tissues from 100 patients with colorectal cancers and fourteen normal colorectal tissues was measured by means of quantitative methylation reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. Nr, normal colorectal tissues; Adj, adjacent normal colorectal tissues; Tu, colorectal cancer tissues.
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Figure 1: Percentage of methylation ratio (PMR) contains nine cancer-associated genes in colorectal cancer patients. Promoter methylation of nine tumor-association genes in tumor tissues and corresponding adjacent normal tissues from 100 patients with colorectal cancers and fourteen normal colorectal tissues was measured by means of quantitative methylation reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. Nr, normal colorectal tissues; Adj, adjacent normal colorectal tissues; Tu, colorectal cancer tissues.

Mentions: We performed the statistical analysis by defining the proportion of hypermethylation as a given PMR value of 10 (PMR 10). The hypermethylation of nine cancer-associated genes showed an increase in the adjacent normal and cancer tissues among CRC patients compared with normal colorectal tissues (Figure 1). The hypermethylation of nine genes for both adjacent normal and cancer tissues in CRC patients was higher more increased than that for normal tissues. However, the amounts of p16INK4a and E-cadherin gene hypermethylation in normal and cancer tissues were not significantly different and TIMP3 gene hypermethylation was not significantly different in adjacent normal and cancer tissues (Figure 1). The average PMR values and hypermethylation frequencies from the quantitative methylation RT-PCR are summarized in Table 2. Among the nine cancer-associated genes, hypermethylation of TIMP3, E-cadherin, ABCB1, and COX2 genes were abundantly found in normal colorectal tissues within the PMR 10. However, the average PMR values of each gene other than E-cadherin were higher in the cancer tissues than in the normal tissues (Table 2). The p16INK4a gene hypermethylation frequencies for the adjacent normal and cancer tissues with PMR 10 were 10% and 14%, respectively. No significant difference was revealed (Table 2) (p>0.05). The association between hypermethylation and clinical parameters in the 100 CRC patients in accordance with PMR 10 is presented in Table 3. The hypermethylation of nine cancer-associated genes in CRC tissues was not associated with any clinical parameters including age, gender, smoking status, alcohol intake, or cancer staging. With Cohen's kappa test, it was observed that RASSF1 was moderately related to E-cadherin, and Smad4 with ABCB1 and COX2 (Table 4).


Quantitative analysis of cancer-associated gene methylation connected to risk factors in Korean colorectal cancer patients.

Kang HJ, Kim EJ, Kim BG, You CH, Lee SY, Kim DI, Hong YS - J Prev Med Public Health (2012)

Percentage of methylation ratio (PMR) contains nine cancer-associated genes in colorectal cancer patients. Promoter methylation of nine tumor-association genes in tumor tissues and corresponding adjacent normal tissues from 100 patients with colorectal cancers and fourteen normal colorectal tissues was measured by means of quantitative methylation reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. Nr, normal colorectal tissues; Adj, adjacent normal colorectal tissues; Tu, colorectal cancer tissues.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3412988&req=5

Figure 1: Percentage of methylation ratio (PMR) contains nine cancer-associated genes in colorectal cancer patients. Promoter methylation of nine tumor-association genes in tumor tissues and corresponding adjacent normal tissues from 100 patients with colorectal cancers and fourteen normal colorectal tissues was measured by means of quantitative methylation reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. Nr, normal colorectal tissues; Adj, adjacent normal colorectal tissues; Tu, colorectal cancer tissues.
Mentions: We performed the statistical analysis by defining the proportion of hypermethylation as a given PMR value of 10 (PMR 10). The hypermethylation of nine cancer-associated genes showed an increase in the adjacent normal and cancer tissues among CRC patients compared with normal colorectal tissues (Figure 1). The hypermethylation of nine genes for both adjacent normal and cancer tissues in CRC patients was higher more increased than that for normal tissues. However, the amounts of p16INK4a and E-cadherin gene hypermethylation in normal and cancer tissues were not significantly different and TIMP3 gene hypermethylation was not significantly different in adjacent normal and cancer tissues (Figure 1). The average PMR values and hypermethylation frequencies from the quantitative methylation RT-PCR are summarized in Table 2. Among the nine cancer-associated genes, hypermethylation of TIMP3, E-cadherin, ABCB1, and COX2 genes were abundantly found in normal colorectal tissues within the PMR 10. However, the average PMR values of each gene other than E-cadherin were higher in the cancer tissues than in the normal tissues (Table 2). The p16INK4a gene hypermethylation frequencies for the adjacent normal and cancer tissues with PMR 10 were 10% and 14%, respectively. No significant difference was revealed (Table 2) (p>0.05). The association between hypermethylation and clinical parameters in the 100 CRC patients in accordance with PMR 10 is presented in Table 3. The hypermethylation of nine cancer-associated genes in CRC tissues was not associated with any clinical parameters including age, gender, smoking status, alcohol intake, or cancer staging. With Cohen's kappa test, it was observed that RASSF1 was moderately related to E-cadherin, and Smad4 with ABCB1 and COX2 (Table 4).

Bottom Line: The hypermethylation of TIMP3, E-cadherin, ABCB1, and COX2 genes among other genes were abundantly found in normal colorectal tissues.In Cohen's kappa test, it was moderately observed that RASSF1 was related with E-cadherin, and Smad4 with ABCB1 and COX2.This study provides evidence for different hypermethylation patterns of cancer-associated genes in normal and CRC tissues, which may serve as useful information on CRC cancer progression.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Preventive Medicine, Dong-A University College of Medicine, Busan, Korea.

ABSTRACT

Objectives: The purpose of this paper was to elucidate the potential methylation levels of adjacent normal and cancer tissues by comparing them with normal colorectal tissues, and to describe the correlations between the methylation and clinical parameters in Korean colorectal cancer (CRC) patients.

Methods: Hypermethylation profiles of nine genes (RASSF1, APC, p16(INK4a), Twist1, E-cadherin, TIMP3, Smad4, COX2, and ABCB1) were examined with 100 sets of cancer tissues and 14 normal colorectal tissues. We determined the hypermethylation at a given level by a percent of methylation ratio value of 10 using quantitative methylation real-time polymerase chain reaction.

Results: Nine genes' hypermethylation levels in Korean CRC patient tissues were increased more higher than normal colorectal tissues. However, the amounts of p16(INK4a) and E-cadherin gene hypermethylation in normal and CRC tissues were not significantly different nor did TIMP3 gene hypermethylation in adjacent normal and cancer tissues differ significantly. The hypermethylation of TIMP3, E-cadherin, ABCB1, and COX2 genes among other genes were abundantly found in normal colorectal tissues. The hypermethylation of nine genes' methylation in cancer tissues was not significantly associated with any clinical parameters. In Cohen's kappa test, it was moderately observed that RASSF1 was related with E-cadherin, and Smad4 with ABCB1 and COX2.

Conclusions: This study provides evidence for different hypermethylation patterns of cancer-associated genes in normal and CRC tissues, which may serve as useful information on CRC cancer progression.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus