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Seroprevalence of measles-, mumps- and rubella-specific IgG antibodies in German children and adolescents and predictors for seronegativity.

Poethko-Müller C, Mankertz A - PLoS ONE (2012)

Bottom Line: Search for predictors of missing seroprevalence identified young age to be the most important predictor.For mumps, high differences were observed for seronegativity after one-dose and two-dose vaccination, respectively.Seronegativity increases as time since last vaccination passes thus indicating significant waning effects for all three components of MMR.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Epidemiology and Health Reporting, Robert Koch Institute, Berlin, Germany. poethko-muellerc@rki.de

ABSTRACT
We have undertaken a seroprevalence study with more than 13,000 children, who had been included in the German KIGGS survey, a representative sample of children and adolescents 0-17 years of age. The IgG titres against measles, mumps and rubella were determined in 1 to 17 year olds While 88.8% of the children were MMR-vaccinated at least once, 76.8% of children aged 1 to 17 years showed prevalence of antibodies to MMR. The highest seronegativity was seen with respect to mumps. Gender differences were most pronounced with regard to rubella IgG titres: girls aged 14 to 17 years were best protected, although seronegativity in 6.8% of this vulnerable group still shows the need of improvement. Search for predictors of missing seroprevalence identified young age to be the most important predictor. Children living in the former West and children born outside of Germany had a higher risk of lacking protection against measles and rubella, while children with a migration background but born in Germany were less often seronegative to measles antibodies than their German contemporaries. An association of seronegativity and early vaccination was seen for measles but not for mumps and rubella. A high maternal educational level was associated with seronegativity to measles and rubella. In vaccinated children, seronegativity was highest for mumps and lowest for rubella. For mumps, high differences were observed for seronegativity after one-dose and two-dose vaccination, respectively. Seronegativity increases as time since last vaccination passes thus indicating significant waning effects for all three components of MMR.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

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pone-0042867-g001: Flow chart on study subjects.

Mentions: In a second step, the seroprevalence of measles-, mumps and rubella specific antibodies was stratified by factors related to vaccination status (number of vaccination doses, age at first vaccination, years since last vaccination, history of the respective infection). In these analyses only vaccinated children were included for whom a valid vaccination card was presented (Figure 1). Children whose blood sample was taken within 21 days after their first vaccination (measles: n = 30; mumps: n = 32; rubella: n = 36) were excluded from the analyses (paragraph 3.3 and 3.4). The MMR-vaccination rate (paragraph 3.1) was obtained in a subset of 12,972 children for whom a vaccination card was provided or for whom parents reported that they were (yet) unvaccinated.


Seroprevalence of measles-, mumps- and rubella-specific IgG antibodies in German children and adolescents and predictors for seronegativity.

Poethko-Müller C, Mankertz A - PLoS ONE (2012)

Flow chart on study subjects.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3412821&req=5

pone-0042867-g001: Flow chart on study subjects.
Mentions: In a second step, the seroprevalence of measles-, mumps and rubella specific antibodies was stratified by factors related to vaccination status (number of vaccination doses, age at first vaccination, years since last vaccination, history of the respective infection). In these analyses only vaccinated children were included for whom a valid vaccination card was presented (Figure 1). Children whose blood sample was taken within 21 days after their first vaccination (measles: n = 30; mumps: n = 32; rubella: n = 36) were excluded from the analyses (paragraph 3.3 and 3.4). The MMR-vaccination rate (paragraph 3.1) was obtained in a subset of 12,972 children for whom a vaccination card was provided or for whom parents reported that they were (yet) unvaccinated.

Bottom Line: Search for predictors of missing seroprevalence identified young age to be the most important predictor.For mumps, high differences were observed for seronegativity after one-dose and two-dose vaccination, respectively.Seronegativity increases as time since last vaccination passes thus indicating significant waning effects for all three components of MMR.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Epidemiology and Health Reporting, Robert Koch Institute, Berlin, Germany. poethko-muellerc@rki.de

ABSTRACT
We have undertaken a seroprevalence study with more than 13,000 children, who had been included in the German KIGGS survey, a representative sample of children and adolescents 0-17 years of age. The IgG titres against measles, mumps and rubella were determined in 1 to 17 year olds While 88.8% of the children were MMR-vaccinated at least once, 76.8% of children aged 1 to 17 years showed prevalence of antibodies to MMR. The highest seronegativity was seen with respect to mumps. Gender differences were most pronounced with regard to rubella IgG titres: girls aged 14 to 17 years were best protected, although seronegativity in 6.8% of this vulnerable group still shows the need of improvement. Search for predictors of missing seroprevalence identified young age to be the most important predictor. Children living in the former West and children born outside of Germany had a higher risk of lacking protection against measles and rubella, while children with a migration background but born in Germany were less often seronegative to measles antibodies than their German contemporaries. An association of seronegativity and early vaccination was seen for measles but not for mumps and rubella. A high maternal educational level was associated with seronegativity to measles and rubella. In vaccinated children, seronegativity was highest for mumps and lowest for rubella. For mumps, high differences were observed for seronegativity after one-dose and two-dose vaccination, respectively. Seronegativity increases as time since last vaccination passes thus indicating significant waning effects for all three components of MMR.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus