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The cortical signature of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

Agosta F, Valsasina P, Riva N, Copetti M, Messina MJ, Prelle A, Comi G, Filippi M - PLoS ONE (2012)

Bottom Line: Group differences in cortical thickness and the age-by-group effects were assessed using vertex-by-vertex and multivariate linear models.There was a significant age-by-group effect in the sensorimotor cortices bilaterally, suggesting a stronger association between age and cortical thinning in ALS patients compared to controls.Cortical thickness measurements allowed the detection and quantification of motor and extramotor involvement in patients with ALS.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Neuroimaging Research Unit, Institute of Experimental Neurology, Division of Neuroscience, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Vita-Salute San Raffaele University, Milan, Italy.

ABSTRACT
The aim of this study was to explore the pattern of regional cortical thickness in patients with non-familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and to investigate whether cortical thinning is associated with disease progression rate. Cortical thickness analysis was performed in 44 ALS patients and 26 healthy controls. Group differences in cortical thickness and the age-by-group effects were assessed using vertex-by-vertex and multivariate linear models. The discriminatory ability of MRI variables in distinguishing patients from controls was estimated using the Concordance Statistics (C-statistic) within logistic regression analyses. Correlations between cortical thickness measures and disease progression rate were tested using the Pearson coefficient. Relative to controls, ALS patients showed a bilateral cortical thinning of the primary motor, prefrontal and ventral frontal cortices, cingulate gyrus, insula, superior and inferior temporal and parietal regions, and medial and lateral occipital areas. There was a significant age-by-group effect in the sensorimotor cortices bilaterally, suggesting a stronger association between age and cortical thinning in ALS patients compared to controls. The mean cortical thickness of the sensorimotor cortices distinguished patients with ALS from controls (C-statistic ≥ 0.74). Cortical thinning of the left sensorimotor cortices was related to a faster clinical progression (r = -0.33, p = 0.03). Cortical thickness measurements allowed the detection and quantification of motor and extramotor involvement in patients with ALS. Cortical thinning of the precentral gyrus might offer a marker of upper motor neuron involvement and disease progression.

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Cortical regions showing a significant cortical thinning in patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis compared with healthy controls overlaid on the lateral (top row) and medial (bottom row) views of the left and right hemispheres.Regions are color-coded according to the percent difference of cortical thickness between the two groups.
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pone-0042816-g002: Cortical regions showing a significant cortical thinning in patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis compared with healthy controls overlaid on the lateral (top row) and medial (bottom row) views of the left and right hemispheres.Regions are color-coded according to the percent difference of cortical thickness between the two groups.

Mentions: In the left hemisphere (Table 1; Figure 2), ALS patients showed a significant thinning (p<0.05, False-discovery rate [FDR]-corrected for multiple comparisons) of: a) frontal lobe (average thinning ranging from 8 to 12%), comprising the inferior part of the precentral sulcus, inferior and middle frontal sulci, and medial orbital sulcus; b) limbic lobe, comprising the left cingulate sulcus (marginal branch, thinning of 11%) and middle-posterior cingulate gyrus and sulcus (pMCC, average thinning = 8%); c) insula, comprising the circular (average thinning = 8%) and lateral (average thinning = 11%) sulci; d) temporal lobe, comprising the anterior transverse collateral sulcus (average thinning = 11%); and e) parietal and occipital areas (average thinning ranging from 8 to 10%), comprising the postcentral sulcus, intraparietal and transverse parietal sulci, and parieto-occipital sulcus. In the right hemisphere (Table 2; Figure 2), ALS patients showed a cortical thinning (p<0.05, FDR-corrected for multiple comparisons) of: a) frontal lobe (average thinning ranging from 8 to 11%), comprising the inferior part of the precentral sulcus, inferior, middle, and superior frontal sulci, and lateral and medial orbital sulci; b) limbic lobe (average thinning ranging from 8 to 12%), comprising the right cingulate sulcus (marginal branch), and anterior (ACC), middle-anterior (aMCC), pMCC, and posterior-ventral (vPCC) parts of the cingulate gyri and sulci; c) insula (thinning ranging from 9 to 13%), comprising the circular and lateral sulci; d) temporal lobe (average thinning ranging from 8 to 12%), comprising the superior temporal gyrus, and inferior and superior temporal sulci; e) parietal lobe (average thinning ranging from 9 to 11%), comprising the postcentral, intraparietal, transverse parietal and subparietal sulci; and f) occipital lobe (average thinning ranging from 9 to 10%), comprising the anterior occipital sulcus and preoccipital notch, lateral and medial occipito-temporal sulci, lingual sulcus, and parieto-occipital sulci. No regions with reduced cortical thickness were found in controls compared to ALS patients. The results did not change when the analysis was performed in limb-onset ALS patients compared with healthy controls (data not shown).


The cortical signature of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

Agosta F, Valsasina P, Riva N, Copetti M, Messina MJ, Prelle A, Comi G, Filippi M - PLoS ONE (2012)

Cortical regions showing a significant cortical thinning in patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis compared with healthy controls overlaid on the lateral (top row) and medial (bottom row) views of the left and right hemispheres.Regions are color-coded according to the percent difference of cortical thickness between the two groups.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3412820&req=5

pone-0042816-g002: Cortical regions showing a significant cortical thinning in patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis compared with healthy controls overlaid on the lateral (top row) and medial (bottom row) views of the left and right hemispheres.Regions are color-coded according to the percent difference of cortical thickness between the two groups.
Mentions: In the left hemisphere (Table 1; Figure 2), ALS patients showed a significant thinning (p<0.05, False-discovery rate [FDR]-corrected for multiple comparisons) of: a) frontal lobe (average thinning ranging from 8 to 12%), comprising the inferior part of the precentral sulcus, inferior and middle frontal sulci, and medial orbital sulcus; b) limbic lobe, comprising the left cingulate sulcus (marginal branch, thinning of 11%) and middle-posterior cingulate gyrus and sulcus (pMCC, average thinning = 8%); c) insula, comprising the circular (average thinning = 8%) and lateral (average thinning = 11%) sulci; d) temporal lobe, comprising the anterior transverse collateral sulcus (average thinning = 11%); and e) parietal and occipital areas (average thinning ranging from 8 to 10%), comprising the postcentral sulcus, intraparietal and transverse parietal sulci, and parieto-occipital sulcus. In the right hemisphere (Table 2; Figure 2), ALS patients showed a cortical thinning (p<0.05, FDR-corrected for multiple comparisons) of: a) frontal lobe (average thinning ranging from 8 to 11%), comprising the inferior part of the precentral sulcus, inferior, middle, and superior frontal sulci, and lateral and medial orbital sulci; b) limbic lobe (average thinning ranging from 8 to 12%), comprising the right cingulate sulcus (marginal branch), and anterior (ACC), middle-anterior (aMCC), pMCC, and posterior-ventral (vPCC) parts of the cingulate gyri and sulci; c) insula (thinning ranging from 9 to 13%), comprising the circular and lateral sulci; d) temporal lobe (average thinning ranging from 8 to 12%), comprising the superior temporal gyrus, and inferior and superior temporal sulci; e) parietal lobe (average thinning ranging from 9 to 11%), comprising the postcentral, intraparietal, transverse parietal and subparietal sulci; and f) occipital lobe (average thinning ranging from 9 to 10%), comprising the anterior occipital sulcus and preoccipital notch, lateral and medial occipito-temporal sulci, lingual sulcus, and parieto-occipital sulci. No regions with reduced cortical thickness were found in controls compared to ALS patients. The results did not change when the analysis was performed in limb-onset ALS patients compared with healthy controls (data not shown).

Bottom Line: Group differences in cortical thickness and the age-by-group effects were assessed using vertex-by-vertex and multivariate linear models.There was a significant age-by-group effect in the sensorimotor cortices bilaterally, suggesting a stronger association between age and cortical thinning in ALS patients compared to controls.Cortical thickness measurements allowed the detection and quantification of motor and extramotor involvement in patients with ALS.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Neuroimaging Research Unit, Institute of Experimental Neurology, Division of Neuroscience, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Vita-Salute San Raffaele University, Milan, Italy.

ABSTRACT
The aim of this study was to explore the pattern of regional cortical thickness in patients with non-familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and to investigate whether cortical thinning is associated with disease progression rate. Cortical thickness analysis was performed in 44 ALS patients and 26 healthy controls. Group differences in cortical thickness and the age-by-group effects were assessed using vertex-by-vertex and multivariate linear models. The discriminatory ability of MRI variables in distinguishing patients from controls was estimated using the Concordance Statistics (C-statistic) within logistic regression analyses. Correlations between cortical thickness measures and disease progression rate were tested using the Pearson coefficient. Relative to controls, ALS patients showed a bilateral cortical thinning of the primary motor, prefrontal and ventral frontal cortices, cingulate gyrus, insula, superior and inferior temporal and parietal regions, and medial and lateral occipital areas. There was a significant age-by-group effect in the sensorimotor cortices bilaterally, suggesting a stronger association between age and cortical thinning in ALS patients compared to controls. The mean cortical thickness of the sensorimotor cortices distinguished patients with ALS from controls (C-statistic ≥ 0.74). Cortical thinning of the left sensorimotor cortices was related to a faster clinical progression (r = -0.33, p = 0.03). Cortical thickness measurements allowed the detection and quantification of motor and extramotor involvement in patients with ALS. Cortical thinning of the precentral gyrus might offer a marker of upper motor neuron involvement and disease progression.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus