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Physiotherapy intervention in Parkinson's disease: systematic review and meta-analysis.

Tomlinson CL, Patel S, Meek C, Herd CP, Clarke CE, Stowe R, Shah L, Sackley C, Deane KH, Wheatley K, Ives N - BMJ (2012)

Bottom Line: To assess the effectiveness of physiotherapy compared with no intervention in patients with Parkinson's disease.Outcomes which may be clinically significant were speed (0.04 m/s, 95% confidence interval 0.02 to 0.06, P<0.001), Berg balance scale (3.71 points, 2.30 to 5.11, P<0.001), and scores on the unified Parkinson's disease rating scale (total score -6.15 points, -8.57 to -3.73, P<0.001; activities of daily living subscore -1.36, -2.41 to -0.30, P=0.01; motor subscore -5.01, -6.30 to -3.72, P<0.001).A wide range of physiotherapy techniques are currently used to treat Parkinson's disease, with little difference in treatment effects.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Birmingham Clinical Trials Unit, University of Birmingham, Birmingham B15 2TT, UK.

ABSTRACT

Objective: To assess the effectiveness of physiotherapy compared with no intervention in patients with Parkinson's disease.

Design: Systematic review and meta-analysis of randomised controlled trials.

Data sources: Literature databases, trial registries, journals, abstract books, and conference proceedings, and reference lists, searched up to the end of January 2012.

Review methods: Randomised controlled trials comparing physiotherapy with no intervention in patients with Parkinson's disease were eligible. Two authors independently abstracted data from each trial. Standard meta-analysis methods were used to assess the effectiveness of physiotherapy compared with no intervention. Tests for heterogeneity were used to assess for differences in treatment effect across different physiotherapy interventions used. Outcome measures were gait, functional mobility and balance, falls, clinician rated impairment and disability measures, patient rated quality of life, adverse events, compliance, and economic analysis outcomes.

Results: 39 trials of 1827 participants met the inclusion criteria, of which 29 trials provided data for the meta-analyses. Significant benefit from physiotherapy was reported for nine of 18 outcomes assessed. Outcomes which may be clinically significant were speed (0.04 m/s, 95% confidence interval 0.02 to 0.06, P<0.001), Berg balance scale (3.71 points, 2.30 to 5.11, P<0.001), and scores on the unified Parkinson's disease rating scale (total score -6.15 points, -8.57 to -3.73, P<0.001; activities of daily living subscore -1.36, -2.41 to -0.30, P=0.01; motor subscore -5.01, -6.30 to -3.72, P<0.001). Indirect comparisons of the different physiotherapy interventions found no evidence that the treatment effect differed across the interventions for any outcomes assessed, apart from motor subscores on the unified Parkinson's disease rating scale (in which one trial was found to be the cause of the heterogeneity).

Conclusions: Physiotherapy has short term benefits in Parkinson's disease. A wide range of physiotherapy techniques are currently used to treat Parkinson's disease, with little difference in treatment effects. Large, well designed, randomised controlled trials with improved methodology and reporting are needed to assess the efficacy and cost effectiveness of physiotherapy for treating Parkinson's disease in the longer term.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Fig 1 Trial flow diagram to summarise the stages of systematic review
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fig1: Fig 1 Trial flow diagram to summarise the stages of systematic review

Mentions: Of 76 potentially relevant studies identified, 31 were excluded (for example, studies were not properly randomised, or crossover trials did not report data for the first intervention period) and six were ongoing trials for which no data were available (fig 1). Therefore, we included 39 randomised controlled trials of 1827 patients in the systematic review (fig 1, web table 1).252627282930313233343536373839404142434445464748495051525354555657585960616263 There were nine trials with multiple arms.273137384045525560 In five trials, two intervention arms were in the same physiotherapy category; therefore, these arms were combined to give one physiotherapy comparison versus no intervention.3740525560 In five trials, two intervention arms were in different physiotherapy categories, so the trial contributed data to two physiotherapy comparisons.2731384560 This meant that these five trials were included multiple times in the analysis, and the control arms from these trials were counted more than once. Therefore, 39 trials contributed data for 44 comparisons within the six different physiotherapy interventions (physiotherapy n=7, exercise n=14, treadmill training n=8, cueing n=9, dance n=2, and martial arts n=4, table 1).


Physiotherapy intervention in Parkinson's disease: systematic review and meta-analysis.

Tomlinson CL, Patel S, Meek C, Herd CP, Clarke CE, Stowe R, Shah L, Sackley C, Deane KH, Wheatley K, Ives N - BMJ (2012)

Fig 1 Trial flow diagram to summarise the stages of systematic review
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3412755&req=5

fig1: Fig 1 Trial flow diagram to summarise the stages of systematic review
Mentions: Of 76 potentially relevant studies identified, 31 were excluded (for example, studies were not properly randomised, or crossover trials did not report data for the first intervention period) and six were ongoing trials for which no data were available (fig 1). Therefore, we included 39 randomised controlled trials of 1827 patients in the systematic review (fig 1, web table 1).252627282930313233343536373839404142434445464748495051525354555657585960616263 There were nine trials with multiple arms.273137384045525560 In five trials, two intervention arms were in the same physiotherapy category; therefore, these arms were combined to give one physiotherapy comparison versus no intervention.3740525560 In five trials, two intervention arms were in different physiotherapy categories, so the trial contributed data to two physiotherapy comparisons.2731384560 This meant that these five trials were included multiple times in the analysis, and the control arms from these trials were counted more than once. Therefore, 39 trials contributed data for 44 comparisons within the six different physiotherapy interventions (physiotherapy n=7, exercise n=14, treadmill training n=8, cueing n=9, dance n=2, and martial arts n=4, table 1).

Bottom Line: To assess the effectiveness of physiotherapy compared with no intervention in patients with Parkinson's disease.Outcomes which may be clinically significant were speed (0.04 m/s, 95% confidence interval 0.02 to 0.06, P<0.001), Berg balance scale (3.71 points, 2.30 to 5.11, P<0.001), and scores on the unified Parkinson's disease rating scale (total score -6.15 points, -8.57 to -3.73, P<0.001; activities of daily living subscore -1.36, -2.41 to -0.30, P=0.01; motor subscore -5.01, -6.30 to -3.72, P<0.001).A wide range of physiotherapy techniques are currently used to treat Parkinson's disease, with little difference in treatment effects.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Birmingham Clinical Trials Unit, University of Birmingham, Birmingham B15 2TT, UK.

ABSTRACT

Objective: To assess the effectiveness of physiotherapy compared with no intervention in patients with Parkinson's disease.

Design: Systematic review and meta-analysis of randomised controlled trials.

Data sources: Literature databases, trial registries, journals, abstract books, and conference proceedings, and reference lists, searched up to the end of January 2012.

Review methods: Randomised controlled trials comparing physiotherapy with no intervention in patients with Parkinson's disease were eligible. Two authors independently abstracted data from each trial. Standard meta-analysis methods were used to assess the effectiveness of physiotherapy compared with no intervention. Tests for heterogeneity were used to assess for differences in treatment effect across different physiotherapy interventions used. Outcome measures were gait, functional mobility and balance, falls, clinician rated impairment and disability measures, patient rated quality of life, adverse events, compliance, and economic analysis outcomes.

Results: 39 trials of 1827 participants met the inclusion criteria, of which 29 trials provided data for the meta-analyses. Significant benefit from physiotherapy was reported for nine of 18 outcomes assessed. Outcomes which may be clinically significant were speed (0.04 m/s, 95% confidence interval 0.02 to 0.06, P<0.001), Berg balance scale (3.71 points, 2.30 to 5.11, P<0.001), and scores on the unified Parkinson's disease rating scale (total score -6.15 points, -8.57 to -3.73, P<0.001; activities of daily living subscore -1.36, -2.41 to -0.30, P=0.01; motor subscore -5.01, -6.30 to -3.72, P<0.001). Indirect comparisons of the different physiotherapy interventions found no evidence that the treatment effect differed across the interventions for any outcomes assessed, apart from motor subscores on the unified Parkinson's disease rating scale (in which one trial was found to be the cause of the heterogeneity).

Conclusions: Physiotherapy has short term benefits in Parkinson's disease. A wide range of physiotherapy techniques are currently used to treat Parkinson's disease, with little difference in treatment effects. Large, well designed, randomised controlled trials with improved methodology and reporting are needed to assess the efficacy and cost effectiveness of physiotherapy for treating Parkinson's disease in the longer term.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus