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Schneider membrane elevation in presence of sinus septa: anatomic features and surgical management.

Beretta M, Cicciù M, Bramanti E, Maiorana C - Int J Dent (2012)

Bottom Line: Radiographic identification of these structures is important in order to perform the right design of the lateral window during sinus lift.Aim of this investigation is to highlight the correct steps for doing sinus lift surgery in presence of those anatomic variations.Clinicians should always perform clinical and radiographic diagnosis in order to avoid complications related to the sinus lift surgery.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Implantology Department, School of Dentistry, University of Milan, IRCSS Cà Grande, MI, Italy.

ABSTRACT
Maxillary sinus floor elevation via a lateral approach is a predictable technique to increase bone volume of the edentulous posterior maxilla and consequently for dental implants placement. The sinus floor is elevated and it can be augmented with either autologous or xenogeneic bone grafts following an opening bone window created on the facial buccal wall. Maxillary septa are walls of cortical bone within the maxillary sinus. The septa shape has been described as an inverted gothic arch arising from the inferior or lateral walls of the sinus and may even divide the sinus into two or more cavities. Some authors have reported a higher prevalence of septa in atrophic edentulous areas than in nonatrophic ones. Radiographic identification of these structures is important in order to perform the right design of the lateral window during sinus lift. Aim of this investigation is to highlight the correct steps for doing sinus lift surgery in presence of those anatomic variations. Clinicians should always perform clinical and radiographic diagnosis in order to avoid complications related to the sinus lift surgery.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Deproteinized bovine bone has been used for covering the bone defect and for increasing the bone volume of the maxilla after the sinus lift.
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fig7: Deproteinized bovine bone has been used for covering the bone defect and for increasing the bone volume of the maxilla after the sinus lift.

Mentions: In this surgical technique, a hinged window is made in the facial antral wall and inverted to create space for the grafting material. Either an autologous or a xenogenic bone graft is then placed between the former antral floor and the elevated sinus membrane, including or not inverted bone plate [31]. The presence of maxillary sinus septa can complicate both the luxation of the window into the sinus and the lifting of the membrane [20]. Boyne and James [2] advise cutting the septa with a chisel and removing them with haemostatic forceps, for placing the graft into the cavity without interruption. Sometimes, it is necessary to modify the buccal window design to avoid fracturing the septa: if the septa is high, it is advised to make two windows, one on each side [4, 32] or make one w-shaped window if the septa is lower [4] (Figures 5, 6, 7, and 8).


Schneider membrane elevation in presence of sinus septa: anatomic features and surgical management.

Beretta M, Cicciù M, Bramanti E, Maiorana C - Int J Dent (2012)

Deproteinized bovine bone has been used for covering the bone defect and for increasing the bone volume of the maxilla after the sinus lift.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3405661&req=5

fig7: Deproteinized bovine bone has been used for covering the bone defect and for increasing the bone volume of the maxilla after the sinus lift.
Mentions: In this surgical technique, a hinged window is made in the facial antral wall and inverted to create space for the grafting material. Either an autologous or a xenogenic bone graft is then placed between the former antral floor and the elevated sinus membrane, including or not inverted bone plate [31]. The presence of maxillary sinus septa can complicate both the luxation of the window into the sinus and the lifting of the membrane [20]. Boyne and James [2] advise cutting the septa with a chisel and removing them with haemostatic forceps, for placing the graft into the cavity without interruption. Sometimes, it is necessary to modify the buccal window design to avoid fracturing the septa: if the septa is high, it is advised to make two windows, one on each side [4, 32] or make one w-shaped window if the septa is lower [4] (Figures 5, 6, 7, and 8).

Bottom Line: Radiographic identification of these structures is important in order to perform the right design of the lateral window during sinus lift.Aim of this investigation is to highlight the correct steps for doing sinus lift surgery in presence of those anatomic variations.Clinicians should always perform clinical and radiographic diagnosis in order to avoid complications related to the sinus lift surgery.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Implantology Department, School of Dentistry, University of Milan, IRCSS Cà Grande, MI, Italy.

ABSTRACT
Maxillary sinus floor elevation via a lateral approach is a predictable technique to increase bone volume of the edentulous posterior maxilla and consequently for dental implants placement. The sinus floor is elevated and it can be augmented with either autologous or xenogeneic bone grafts following an opening bone window created on the facial buccal wall. Maxillary septa are walls of cortical bone within the maxillary sinus. The septa shape has been described as an inverted gothic arch arising from the inferior or lateral walls of the sinus and may even divide the sinus into two or more cavities. Some authors have reported a higher prevalence of septa in atrophic edentulous areas than in nonatrophic ones. Radiographic identification of these structures is important in order to perform the right design of the lateral window during sinus lift. Aim of this investigation is to highlight the correct steps for doing sinus lift surgery in presence of those anatomic variations. Clinicians should always perform clinical and radiographic diagnosis in order to avoid complications related to the sinus lift surgery.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus