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The biological effects of subacute inhalation of diesel exhaust following addition of cerium oxide nanoparticles in atherosclerosis-prone mice.

Cassee FR, Campbell A, Boere AJ, McLean SG, Duffin R, Krystek P, Gosens I, Miller MR - Environ. Res. (2012)

Bottom Line: Addition of CeO(2) to fuel resulted in a reduction of the number (30%) and surface area (10%) of the particles in the exhaust, whereas the gaseous co-pollutants were increased (6-8%).These results imply that addition of CeO(2) nanoparticles to fuel decreases the number of particles in exhaust and may reduce atherosclerotic burden associated with exposure to standard diesel fuel.However, further testing is required to ensure that such an approach is not associated with a chronic inflammatory response which may eventually cause long-term health effects.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: National Institute for Public Health and the Environment, PO box 1, 3720 BA Bilthoven, The Netherlands. flemming.cassee@rivm.nl

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Effect of diesel exhaust, with (DCeE) or without (DE) cerium oxide, on atherosclerotic plaques in the brachiocephalic artery. (a) Plaque size, standardized as a percentage of the area of the media. (b) Example images showing (i) three “adjoining plaques” (black arrows) and (ii) a “buried fibrous layer” (thin white arrows) with an overlying secondary plaque (thin black arrows). Thick white arrow (with black outline) indicates a potential site of a previously healed plaque rupture. United States Trichrome staining. Black scale bar=100 μm. (c) Plaque “complexity” as assessed by the frequency of adjoining plaques or buried fibrous layers. Mean±S.E.M. (n=7−16), *P<0.05; unpaired t-tests, comparing with control.
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f0010: Effect of diesel exhaust, with (DCeE) or without (DE) cerium oxide, on atherosclerotic plaques in the brachiocephalic artery. (a) Plaque size, standardized as a percentage of the area of the media. (b) Example images showing (i) three “adjoining plaques” (black arrows) and (ii) a “buried fibrous layer” (thin white arrows) with an overlying secondary plaque (thin black arrows). Thick white arrow (with black outline) indicates a potential site of a previously healed plaque rupture. United States Trichrome staining. Black scale bar=100 μm. (c) Plaque “complexity” as assessed by the frequency of adjoining plaques or buried fibrous layers. Mean±S.E.M. (n=7−16), *P<0.05; unpaired t-tests, comparing with control.

Mentions: Overall, there was a trend that “standard” diesel exhaust increased the atherosclerotic burden, with an ∼35% increase in plaque size compared to control (Fig. 2(a)). This effect was not seen in the DCeE group. However, these differences did not achieve statistical significance (P=0.12 for Control vs DE; P=0.10 for Control vs DCeE). No dose related effect was seen and similar findings were observed if the data on the maximum plaque size (rather than burden throughout the artery) was used (data not shown).


The biological effects of subacute inhalation of diesel exhaust following addition of cerium oxide nanoparticles in atherosclerosis-prone mice.

Cassee FR, Campbell A, Boere AJ, McLean SG, Duffin R, Krystek P, Gosens I, Miller MR - Environ. Res. (2012)

Effect of diesel exhaust, with (DCeE) or without (DE) cerium oxide, on atherosclerotic plaques in the brachiocephalic artery. (a) Plaque size, standardized as a percentage of the area of the media. (b) Example images showing (i) three “adjoining plaques” (black arrows) and (ii) a “buried fibrous layer” (thin white arrows) with an overlying secondary plaque (thin black arrows). Thick white arrow (with black outline) indicates a potential site of a previously healed plaque rupture. United States Trichrome staining. Black scale bar=100 μm. (c) Plaque “complexity” as assessed by the frequency of adjoining plaques or buried fibrous layers. Mean±S.E.M. (n=7−16), *P<0.05; unpaired t-tests, comparing with control.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3405523&req=5

f0010: Effect of diesel exhaust, with (DCeE) or without (DE) cerium oxide, on atherosclerotic plaques in the brachiocephalic artery. (a) Plaque size, standardized as a percentage of the area of the media. (b) Example images showing (i) three “adjoining plaques” (black arrows) and (ii) a “buried fibrous layer” (thin white arrows) with an overlying secondary plaque (thin black arrows). Thick white arrow (with black outline) indicates a potential site of a previously healed plaque rupture. United States Trichrome staining. Black scale bar=100 μm. (c) Plaque “complexity” as assessed by the frequency of adjoining plaques or buried fibrous layers. Mean±S.E.M. (n=7−16), *P<0.05; unpaired t-tests, comparing with control.
Mentions: Overall, there was a trend that “standard” diesel exhaust increased the atherosclerotic burden, with an ∼35% increase in plaque size compared to control (Fig. 2(a)). This effect was not seen in the DCeE group. However, these differences did not achieve statistical significance (P=0.12 for Control vs DE; P=0.10 for Control vs DCeE). No dose related effect was seen and similar findings were observed if the data on the maximum plaque size (rather than burden throughout the artery) was used (data not shown).

Bottom Line: Addition of CeO(2) to fuel resulted in a reduction of the number (30%) and surface area (10%) of the particles in the exhaust, whereas the gaseous co-pollutants were increased (6-8%).These results imply that addition of CeO(2) nanoparticles to fuel decreases the number of particles in exhaust and may reduce atherosclerotic burden associated with exposure to standard diesel fuel.However, further testing is required to ensure that such an approach is not associated with a chronic inflammatory response which may eventually cause long-term health effects.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: National Institute for Public Health and the Environment, PO box 1, 3720 BA Bilthoven, The Netherlands. flemming.cassee@rivm.nl

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus