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Different effects of age, adiposity and physical activity on the risk of ankle, wrist and hip fractures in postmenopausal women.

Armstrong ME, Cairns BJ, Banks E, Green J, Reeves GK, Beral V, Million Women Study Collaborato - Bone (2012)

Bottom Line: All participants were linked to National Health Service cause-specific hospital records for day-case or overnight admissions.Compared with lean women (BMI<20 kg/m(2)), obese women (BMI≥30 kg/m(2)) had a three-fold increased risk of ankle fracture (RR=3.07; 95%CI 2.53-3.74), but a substantially reduced risk of wrist fracture and especially of hip fracture (RR=0.57; 0.51-0.64 and 0.23; 0.21-0.27, respectively).Physical activity was associated with a reduced risk of hip fracture but was not associated with ankle or wrist fracture risk.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Cancer Epidemiology Unit, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK. miranda.armstrong@ceu.ox.ac.uk

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Age-specific incidence per 100 over 5 years (95%CI) of ankle, wrist, and hip fractures among post-menopausal women.
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f0005: Age-specific incidence per 100 over 5 years (95%CI) of ankle, wrist, and hip fractures among post-menopausal women.

Mentions: The baseline characteristics of the 1,155,304 postmenopausal women included in these analyses are shown in Table 1. Women were on average 56.0 (SD 4.8) years of age at recruitment, with a mean BMI of 26.2 (SD 4.7) kg/m2 at recruitment. Mean BMI decreased and mean alcohol consumption increased with increasing frequency of physical activity. During a mean follow-up of 8.3 years per woman (almost 10 million person-years), 6807 women had an incident ankle fracture, 9733 had an incident wrist fracture, and 5267 had an incident hip fracture. Our previous report, with shorter follow-up, included only 2582 women with an incident hip fracture [1]. Age-specific incidence rates did not vary much for ankle fracture, but rates increased gradually with age for wrist fracture and very steeply with age for hip fracture (Fig. 1 and eTable 1). The estimated cumulative absolute risks per 100 women from ages 50 to 84 years were 2.5 (95%CI 2.2–2.8) for ankle fracture, 5.0 (95%CI 4.4–5.5) for wrist fracture, and 6.2 (95%CI 5.5–7.0) for hip fracture.


Different effects of age, adiposity and physical activity on the risk of ankle, wrist and hip fractures in postmenopausal women.

Armstrong ME, Cairns BJ, Banks E, Green J, Reeves GK, Beral V, Million Women Study Collaborato - Bone (2012)

Age-specific incidence per 100 over 5 years (95%CI) of ankle, wrist, and hip fractures among post-menopausal women.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3405513&req=5

f0005: Age-specific incidence per 100 over 5 years (95%CI) of ankle, wrist, and hip fractures among post-menopausal women.
Mentions: The baseline characteristics of the 1,155,304 postmenopausal women included in these analyses are shown in Table 1. Women were on average 56.0 (SD 4.8) years of age at recruitment, with a mean BMI of 26.2 (SD 4.7) kg/m2 at recruitment. Mean BMI decreased and mean alcohol consumption increased with increasing frequency of physical activity. During a mean follow-up of 8.3 years per woman (almost 10 million person-years), 6807 women had an incident ankle fracture, 9733 had an incident wrist fracture, and 5267 had an incident hip fracture. Our previous report, with shorter follow-up, included only 2582 women with an incident hip fracture [1]. Age-specific incidence rates did not vary much for ankle fracture, but rates increased gradually with age for wrist fracture and very steeply with age for hip fracture (Fig. 1 and eTable 1). The estimated cumulative absolute risks per 100 women from ages 50 to 84 years were 2.5 (95%CI 2.2–2.8) for ankle fracture, 5.0 (95%CI 4.4–5.5) for wrist fracture, and 6.2 (95%CI 5.5–7.0) for hip fracture.

Bottom Line: All participants were linked to National Health Service cause-specific hospital records for day-case or overnight admissions.Compared with lean women (BMI<20 kg/m(2)), obese women (BMI≥30 kg/m(2)) had a three-fold increased risk of ankle fracture (RR=3.07; 95%CI 2.53-3.74), but a substantially reduced risk of wrist fracture and especially of hip fracture (RR=0.57; 0.51-0.64 and 0.23; 0.21-0.27, respectively).Physical activity was associated with a reduced risk of hip fracture but was not associated with ankle or wrist fracture risk.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Cancer Epidemiology Unit, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK. miranda.armstrong@ceu.ox.ac.uk

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus