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Epidemiology and prevention of hypertension in Japanese: how could Japan get longevity?

Miura K - EPMA J (2011)

Bottom Line: Decreasing trend in BP occurred both in men and women in all age-groups, which cannot be fully explained by the widespread use of anti-hypertensive agents.The most probable reason for the population-wide BP decline in Japan would be a large decline in dietary salt intake after 1950's.However, other factors including obesity, high alcohol intake, and unfavorable dietary habits could increase BP level of Japanese again.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Health Science, Shiga University of Medical Science, Seta-Tsukinowa-cho, Otsu, Shiga 520-2192 Japan.

ABSTRACT
Japan is one of the countries with the longest longevity in the world, and it was accomplished by a drastic decline in stroke mortality from 1960's. The decline in stroke mortality would be largely explained by a population-wide decreasing trend in blood pressure (BP) level, because higher BP has been the strongest risk factor of stroke; about 20% of total deaths can be explained by higher BP above optimal in Japan. Decreasing trend in BP occurred both in men and women in all age-groups, which cannot be fully explained by the widespread use of anti-hypertensive agents. The most probable reason for the population-wide BP decline in Japan would be a large decline in dietary salt intake after 1950's. However, other factors including obesity, high alcohol intake, and unfavorable dietary habits could increase BP level of Japanese again.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Trends in mean systolic blood pressure in Japanese men and women by age groups, the National Survey on Circulatory Disorders of Japan (1971–2000)
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Fig4: Trends in mean systolic blood pressure in Japanese men and women by age groups, the National Survey on Circulatory Disorders of Japan (1971–2000)

Mentions: During 1960’s, mortality due to stroke in the Japanese population was markedly high by international standards, but has now been drastically reduced to approximately one-seventh of the previous level (Fig. 3). This drastic change is the main cause of elongation in longevity of Japanese during the past several decades, and it is presumably largely due to a steady decrease in the mean BP of the population. This decrease in BP was not only found in the elderly, but also in the middle-aged and younger generations. The National Survey on Circulatory Disorders of Japan showed that in the 30 years from 1971 to 2000, the mean SBP for Japanese men aged 40 to 49 decreased by 3.6 mmHg, from 134.8 mmHg to 131.2 mmHg, and for women aged 40 to 49 it decreased by 7.7 mmHg, from 132.6 mmHg to 124.8 mmHg (Fig. 4) [38, 39].Fig. 3


Epidemiology and prevention of hypertension in Japanese: how could Japan get longevity?

Miura K - EPMA J (2011)

Trends in mean systolic blood pressure in Japanese men and women by age groups, the National Survey on Circulatory Disorders of Japan (1971–2000)
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3405372&req=5

Fig4: Trends in mean systolic blood pressure in Japanese men and women by age groups, the National Survey on Circulatory Disorders of Japan (1971–2000)
Mentions: During 1960’s, mortality due to stroke in the Japanese population was markedly high by international standards, but has now been drastically reduced to approximately one-seventh of the previous level (Fig. 3). This drastic change is the main cause of elongation in longevity of Japanese during the past several decades, and it is presumably largely due to a steady decrease in the mean BP of the population. This decrease in BP was not only found in the elderly, but also in the middle-aged and younger generations. The National Survey on Circulatory Disorders of Japan showed that in the 30 years from 1971 to 2000, the mean SBP for Japanese men aged 40 to 49 decreased by 3.6 mmHg, from 134.8 mmHg to 131.2 mmHg, and for women aged 40 to 49 it decreased by 7.7 mmHg, from 132.6 mmHg to 124.8 mmHg (Fig. 4) [38, 39].Fig. 3

Bottom Line: Decreasing trend in BP occurred both in men and women in all age-groups, which cannot be fully explained by the widespread use of anti-hypertensive agents.The most probable reason for the population-wide BP decline in Japan would be a large decline in dietary salt intake after 1950's.However, other factors including obesity, high alcohol intake, and unfavorable dietary habits could increase BP level of Japanese again.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Health Science, Shiga University of Medical Science, Seta-Tsukinowa-cho, Otsu, Shiga 520-2192 Japan.

ABSTRACT
Japan is one of the countries with the longest longevity in the world, and it was accomplished by a drastic decline in stroke mortality from 1960's. The decline in stroke mortality would be largely explained by a population-wide decreasing trend in blood pressure (BP) level, because higher BP has been the strongest risk factor of stroke; about 20% of total deaths can be explained by higher BP above optimal in Japan. Decreasing trend in BP occurred both in men and women in all age-groups, which cannot be fully explained by the widespread use of anti-hypertensive agents. The most probable reason for the population-wide BP decline in Japan would be a large decline in dietary salt intake after 1950's. However, other factors including obesity, high alcohol intake, and unfavorable dietary habits could increase BP level of Japanese again.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus