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Adiposity and risk of cardiovascular diseases in Japan: secular trend, individual level associations and causal pathway - implications for the prevention of cardiovascular diseases in societies with rapid economic development.

Yatsuya H, Yamagishi K, Iso H - EPMA J (2011)

Bottom Line: There is an indication that the incidence of ischemic stroke and coronary heart disease remains stable or has been increasing among men.These facts indicate that the relative importance of cardiovascular diseases (CVD) risk factors may have changed.Although it was confirmed at an individual level that the degree of obesity was positively associated with CVD incidence, there is a sizeable proportion of individuals who are at an increased CVD risk state without being overweight/obese in today's Japan.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Public Health and Health Systems, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, 65 Tsurumai-cho Showa-ku, Nagoya, 466-8550 Japan.

ABSTRACT
In Japan, overweight/obesity in adults defined as a body mass index of 25 kg/m(2) or over has roughly doubled among middle-aged men over the past few decades. In parallel with a population rightward shift in the degree of obesity, the proportion of hypertension attributed to overweight has increased. There is an indication that the incidence of ischemic stroke and coronary heart disease remains stable or has been increasing among men. These facts indicate that the relative importance of cardiovascular diseases (CVD) risk factors may have changed. Although it was confirmed at an individual level that the degree of obesity was positively associated with CVD incidence, there is a sizeable proportion of individuals who are at an increased CVD risk state without being overweight/obese in today's Japan. Thus, further implementation and promotion of activities are needed to bring about meaningful changes in the obesity trend in communities that are harmonized with other domains of CVD prevention activities.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Secular changes in the mean body mass index in Japanese men, National Health and Nutritional Survey in Japan 1950–2006
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Related In: Results  -  Collection


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Fig1: Secular changes in the mean body mass index in Japanese men, National Health and Nutritional Survey in Japan 1950–2006

Mentions: In Japan, obesity in adults defined as a BMI of 30 kg/m2 or over [10] has roughly doubled over the past few decades in men, although the absolute prevalence is only 3% [11] in contrast to much higher prevalence in OECD countries (16%, average) [12] or in the United States (34%) [13]. If obesity is defined by a BMI greater than or equal to 25 kg/m2 (Japanese criterion) [14], 28.6% of men and 20.6% of women were obese in 2008. The average BMIs have been increasing consistently since 1950 except for younger women [11, 15] (Figs. 1, 2). Namely, the average BMI of women aged 30–39 and that of women aged 40–49 have been decreasing from 1975 to 1985, respectively. However, if aging-related changes of BMI by birth cohorts are compared, aging during middle age seems to be related to weight gain on average even in younger generation women (born in 1960’s), who weighed less than the older generation at a younger age (30–39), but gained thereafter at least through their sixties (Figs. 3, 4). It is noteworthy that younger generation men enter middle age with a higher BMI, and they experience a continuous increase of BMI. These observations are partly supported by a longitudinal analysis of repeatedly-measured body weight among the same individuals [16].Fig. 1


Adiposity and risk of cardiovascular diseases in Japan: secular trend, individual level associations and causal pathway - implications for the prevention of cardiovascular diseases in societies with rapid economic development.

Yatsuya H, Yamagishi K, Iso H - EPMA J (2011)

Secular changes in the mean body mass index in Japanese men, National Health and Nutritional Survey in Japan 1950–2006
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3405369&req=5

Fig1: Secular changes in the mean body mass index in Japanese men, National Health and Nutritional Survey in Japan 1950–2006
Mentions: In Japan, obesity in adults defined as a BMI of 30 kg/m2 or over [10] has roughly doubled over the past few decades in men, although the absolute prevalence is only 3% [11] in contrast to much higher prevalence in OECD countries (16%, average) [12] or in the United States (34%) [13]. If obesity is defined by a BMI greater than or equal to 25 kg/m2 (Japanese criterion) [14], 28.6% of men and 20.6% of women were obese in 2008. The average BMIs have been increasing consistently since 1950 except for younger women [11, 15] (Figs. 1, 2). Namely, the average BMI of women aged 30–39 and that of women aged 40–49 have been decreasing from 1975 to 1985, respectively. However, if aging-related changes of BMI by birth cohorts are compared, aging during middle age seems to be related to weight gain on average even in younger generation women (born in 1960’s), who weighed less than the older generation at a younger age (30–39), but gained thereafter at least through their sixties (Figs. 3, 4). It is noteworthy that younger generation men enter middle age with a higher BMI, and they experience a continuous increase of BMI. These observations are partly supported by a longitudinal analysis of repeatedly-measured body weight among the same individuals [16].Fig. 1

Bottom Line: There is an indication that the incidence of ischemic stroke and coronary heart disease remains stable or has been increasing among men.These facts indicate that the relative importance of cardiovascular diseases (CVD) risk factors may have changed.Although it was confirmed at an individual level that the degree of obesity was positively associated with CVD incidence, there is a sizeable proportion of individuals who are at an increased CVD risk state without being overweight/obese in today's Japan.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Public Health and Health Systems, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, 65 Tsurumai-cho Showa-ku, Nagoya, 466-8550 Japan.

ABSTRACT
In Japan, overweight/obesity in adults defined as a body mass index of 25 kg/m(2) or over has roughly doubled among middle-aged men over the past few decades. In parallel with a population rightward shift in the degree of obesity, the proportion of hypertension attributed to overweight has increased. There is an indication that the incidence of ischemic stroke and coronary heart disease remains stable or has been increasing among men. These facts indicate that the relative importance of cardiovascular diseases (CVD) risk factors may have changed. Although it was confirmed at an individual level that the degree of obesity was positively associated with CVD incidence, there is a sizeable proportion of individuals who are at an increased CVD risk state without being overweight/obese in today's Japan. Thus, further implementation and promotion of activities are needed to bring about meaningful changes in the obesity trend in communities that are harmonized with other domains of CVD prevention activities.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus