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The German healthcare system.

Döring A, Paul F - EPMA J (2010)

Bottom Line: The foundation of Germany's healthcare system is derived from Germany's Basic Law (Grundgesetz), which obliges the state to provide social services to its citizens (Articles 20, 28 of the Basic Law).Specifically, the state must ensure sufficient, needs-based ambulatory and inpatient medical treatment, in qualitative and quantitative terms, as well as guarantee the provision of medicine.The following paper provides an overview of the structural organization, individual components and funding of the German healthcare system, which, in its current form, is extremely complex and which even experts find difficult to grasp.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: NeuroCure Clinical Research Center, Charité - Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Charitéplatz 1, 10117 Berlin, Germany.

ABSTRACT
The foundation of Germany's healthcare system is derived from Germany's Basic Law (Grundgesetz), which obliges the state to provide social services to its citizens (Articles 20, 28 of the Basic Law). Specifically, the state must ensure sufficient, needs-based ambulatory and inpatient medical treatment, in qualitative and quantitative terms, as well as guarantee the provision of medicine. The federal government may assume this duty itself or delegate it to state governments and institutions in the form of service guarantee contracts (§ 72, German Social Insurance Code, Book V). The following paper provides an overview of the structural organization, individual components and funding of the German healthcare system, which, in its current form, is extremely complex and which even experts find difficult to grasp.

No MeSH data available.


Ambulatory medical treatment in Germany [1]
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Fig3: Ambulatory medical treatment in Germany [1]

Mentions: In contrast to the associations of SHI physicians, medical associations (17 in total) focus on the regulation of the professional practice. They specify the rights and duties of physicians in a professional code of conduct, and define continuing education requirements for specialist training. Additionally, the medical associations enforce compliance with professional duties and form commissions that address various issues, including a mediation commission, expert commissions (for medical malpractice) and review boards (to evaluate research proposals). These associations are also statutory corporations under state law and all physicians (not just the SHI physicians) must be members of a medical association, even after retirement. Medical association members elect representative assembly delegates, who, in turn, elect a board of directors. At federal level, the medical associations are merged in the German Medical Association (Bundesärztekammer, BÄK). The federal association’s primary tasks include a coordinating role for the state medical associations, the organization of networking events and structures, ensuring the uniformity of professional and continuing training guidelines, representing the medical profession in the public sphere and lobbying at policy level [1, 2, 9, 10] (Fig. 3).Fig. 3


The German healthcare system.

Döring A, Paul F - EPMA J (2010)

Ambulatory medical treatment in Germany [1]
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3405354&req=5

Fig3: Ambulatory medical treatment in Germany [1]
Mentions: In contrast to the associations of SHI physicians, medical associations (17 in total) focus on the regulation of the professional practice. They specify the rights and duties of physicians in a professional code of conduct, and define continuing education requirements for specialist training. Additionally, the medical associations enforce compliance with professional duties and form commissions that address various issues, including a mediation commission, expert commissions (for medical malpractice) and review boards (to evaluate research proposals). These associations are also statutory corporations under state law and all physicians (not just the SHI physicians) must be members of a medical association, even after retirement. Medical association members elect representative assembly delegates, who, in turn, elect a board of directors. At federal level, the medical associations are merged in the German Medical Association (Bundesärztekammer, BÄK). The federal association’s primary tasks include a coordinating role for the state medical associations, the organization of networking events and structures, ensuring the uniformity of professional and continuing training guidelines, representing the medical profession in the public sphere and lobbying at policy level [1, 2, 9, 10] (Fig. 3).Fig. 3

Bottom Line: The foundation of Germany's healthcare system is derived from Germany's Basic Law (Grundgesetz), which obliges the state to provide social services to its citizens (Articles 20, 28 of the Basic Law).Specifically, the state must ensure sufficient, needs-based ambulatory and inpatient medical treatment, in qualitative and quantitative terms, as well as guarantee the provision of medicine.The following paper provides an overview of the structural organization, individual components and funding of the German healthcare system, which, in its current form, is extremely complex and which even experts find difficult to grasp.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: NeuroCure Clinical Research Center, Charité - Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Charitéplatz 1, 10117 Berlin, Germany.

ABSTRACT
The foundation of Germany's healthcare system is derived from Germany's Basic Law (Grundgesetz), which obliges the state to provide social services to its citizens (Articles 20, 28 of the Basic Law). Specifically, the state must ensure sufficient, needs-based ambulatory and inpatient medical treatment, in qualitative and quantitative terms, as well as guarantee the provision of medicine. The federal government may assume this duty itself or delegate it to state governments and institutions in the form of service guarantee contracts (§ 72, German Social Insurance Code, Book V). The following paper provides an overview of the structural organization, individual components and funding of the German healthcare system, which, in its current form, is extremely complex and which even experts find difficult to grasp.

No MeSH data available.