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The German healthcare system.

Döring A, Paul F - EPMA J (2010)

Bottom Line: The foundation of Germany's healthcare system is derived from Germany's Basic Law (Grundgesetz), which obliges the state to provide social services to its citizens (Articles 20, 28 of the Basic Law).Specifically, the state must ensure sufficient, needs-based ambulatory and inpatient medical treatment, in qualitative and quantitative terms, as well as guarantee the provision of medicine.The following paper provides an overview of the structural organization, individual components and funding of the German healthcare system, which, in its current form, is extremely complex and which even experts find difficult to grasp.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: NeuroCure Clinical Research Center, Charité - Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Charitéplatz 1, 10117 Berlin, Germany.

ABSTRACT
The foundation of Germany's healthcare system is derived from Germany's Basic Law (Grundgesetz), which obliges the state to provide social services to its citizens (Articles 20, 28 of the Basic Law). Specifically, the state must ensure sufficient, needs-based ambulatory and inpatient medical treatment, in qualitative and quantitative terms, as well as guarantee the provision of medicine. The federal government may assume this duty itself or delegate it to state governments and institutions in the form of service guarantee contracts (§ 72, German Social Insurance Code, Book V). The following paper provides an overview of the structural organization, individual components and funding of the German healthcare system, which, in its current form, is extremely complex and which even experts find difficult to grasp.

No MeSH data available.


The subsidization model [1]
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Fig1: The subsidization model [1]

Mentions: Basic principles of social rights are used as the framework for ensuring social security in cases of illness, and must be followed by both the health insurance companies and health service providers. The principle of the welfare state is based on the Federal Republic of Germany’s Basic Law (Grundgesetz), which specifies that the state must guarantee all citizens social justice and the equal participation in society, including appropriate treatment in case of illness. Individuals with below average earning power or economic resources must receive the same quality and quantity of medical care as others. Thus, overall, the healthcare system is organized around the principle of solidarity (Solidarprinzip), which provides that every member of a supportive society is entitled to assistance from the other members of the society in the case of illness. A main feature of the statutory health insurance scheme is social reconciliation (Solidarausgleich), which is expressed in two main ways: firstly, between the healthy and ill, in that all members – including the healthy – meet the costs of the necessary treatment and benefits if a member falls ill regardless of the individual’s economic resources, including the additional costs of securing the individual’s livelihood, such as continued wages and sickness benefits; and secondly, between high and low incomes, in that up to a defined income threshold, all members of the statutory health insurance pay an income-dependant percentage of their earnings. This solidarity model stands in contrast to the subsidization principle, which provides that an individual’s expenses are only then assumed by the supportive society if the individual is demonstrably overextended. Until such a point, the individual is obliged to contribute to the treatment costs. In the subsidization model, the healthcare expenses are met by a sequence of supportive societies from smallest to largest: the individual, his or her martial or life partner, the family, the statutory health insurance fund, and finally the services the individual is entitled to as a citizen (Fig. 1).Fig. 1


The German healthcare system.

Döring A, Paul F - EPMA J (2010)

The subsidization model [1]
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3405354&req=5

Fig1: The subsidization model [1]
Mentions: Basic principles of social rights are used as the framework for ensuring social security in cases of illness, and must be followed by both the health insurance companies and health service providers. The principle of the welfare state is based on the Federal Republic of Germany’s Basic Law (Grundgesetz), which specifies that the state must guarantee all citizens social justice and the equal participation in society, including appropriate treatment in case of illness. Individuals with below average earning power or economic resources must receive the same quality and quantity of medical care as others. Thus, overall, the healthcare system is organized around the principle of solidarity (Solidarprinzip), which provides that every member of a supportive society is entitled to assistance from the other members of the society in the case of illness. A main feature of the statutory health insurance scheme is social reconciliation (Solidarausgleich), which is expressed in two main ways: firstly, between the healthy and ill, in that all members – including the healthy – meet the costs of the necessary treatment and benefits if a member falls ill regardless of the individual’s economic resources, including the additional costs of securing the individual’s livelihood, such as continued wages and sickness benefits; and secondly, between high and low incomes, in that up to a defined income threshold, all members of the statutory health insurance pay an income-dependant percentage of their earnings. This solidarity model stands in contrast to the subsidization principle, which provides that an individual’s expenses are only then assumed by the supportive society if the individual is demonstrably overextended. Until such a point, the individual is obliged to contribute to the treatment costs. In the subsidization model, the healthcare expenses are met by a sequence of supportive societies from smallest to largest: the individual, his or her martial or life partner, the family, the statutory health insurance fund, and finally the services the individual is entitled to as a citizen (Fig. 1).Fig. 1

Bottom Line: The foundation of Germany's healthcare system is derived from Germany's Basic Law (Grundgesetz), which obliges the state to provide social services to its citizens (Articles 20, 28 of the Basic Law).Specifically, the state must ensure sufficient, needs-based ambulatory and inpatient medical treatment, in qualitative and quantitative terms, as well as guarantee the provision of medicine.The following paper provides an overview of the structural organization, individual components and funding of the German healthcare system, which, in its current form, is extremely complex and which even experts find difficult to grasp.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: NeuroCure Clinical Research Center, Charité - Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Charitéplatz 1, 10117 Berlin, Germany.

ABSTRACT
The foundation of Germany's healthcare system is derived from Germany's Basic Law (Grundgesetz), which obliges the state to provide social services to its citizens (Articles 20, 28 of the Basic Law). Specifically, the state must ensure sufficient, needs-based ambulatory and inpatient medical treatment, in qualitative and quantitative terms, as well as guarantee the provision of medicine. The federal government may assume this duty itself or delegate it to state governments and institutions in the form of service guarantee contracts (§ 72, German Social Insurance Code, Book V). The following paper provides an overview of the structural organization, individual components and funding of the German healthcare system, which, in its current form, is extremely complex and which even experts find difficult to grasp.

No MeSH data available.