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25-hydroxyvitamin D deficiency, exacerbation frequency and human rhinovirus exacerbations in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

Quint JK, Donaldson GC, Wassef N, Hurst JR, Thomas M, Wedzicha JA - BMC Pulm Med (2012)

Bottom Line: Day length was independently associated with 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels (p = 0.02).HRV positive exacerbations were not associated with lower 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels at exacerbation than exacerbations that did not test positive for HRV; medians 30.0 nmol/L (20.4 - 57.8) and 30.6 nmol/L (19.4 - 48.7).Independent of day length, patients who spend less time outdoors have lower 25-hydroxyvitamin D concentration.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Academic Unit of Respiratory Medicine, University College London Medical School, Royal Free Campus, Rowland Hill Street, London, UK. Jennifer.quint@lshtm.ac.uk

ABSTRACT

Background: 25-hydroxyvitamin D deficiency is associated with COPD and increased susceptibility to infection in the general population.

Methods: We investigated whether COPD patients deficient in 25-hydroxyvitamin D were more likely to be frequent exacerbators, had reduced outdoor activity and were more susceptible to human rhinovirus (HRV) exacerbations than those with insufficient and normal levels. We also investigated whether the frequency of FokI, BsmI and TaqIα 25-hydroxyvitamin D receptor (VDR) polymorphisms differed between frequent and infrequent exacerbators.

Results: There was no difference in 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels between frequent and infrequent exacerbators in the summer; medians 44.1 nmol/L (29.1 - 68.0) and 39.4 nmol/L (22.3 - 59.2) or winter; medians 24.9 nmol/L (14.3 - 43.1) and 27.1 nmol/L (19.9 - 37.6). Patients who spent less time outdoors in the 14 days prior to sampling had lower 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels (p = 0.02). Day length was independently associated with 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels (p = 0.02). There was no difference in 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels between baseline and exacerbation; medians 36.2 nmol/L (IQR 22.4-59.4) and 33.3 nmol/L (23.0-49.7); p = 0.43. HRV positive exacerbations were not associated with lower 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels at exacerbation than exacerbations that did not test positive for HRV; medians 30.0 nmol/L (20.4 - 57.8) and 30.6 nmol/L (19.4 - 48.7). There was no relationship between exacerbation frequency and any VDR polymorphisms (all p > 0.05).

Conclusions: Low 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels in COPD are not associated with frequent exacerbations and do not increase susceptibility to HRV exacerbations. Independent of day length, patients who spend less time outdoors have lower 25-hydroxyvitamin D concentration.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

25-hydroxyvitamin D levels in summer and winter in frequent and infrequent exacerbators. Data are presented as median, with the boxes representing the interquartile range and the whiskers representing SD. ○: extreme outliers.
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Figure 2: 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels in summer and winter in frequent and infrequent exacerbators. Data are presented as median, with the boxes representing the interquartile range and the whiskers representing SD. ○: extreme outliers.

Mentions: Figure 2 shows that there was no difference in 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels between frequent exacerbators (1/3 of the cohort) and infrequent exacerbators in the summer; medians 44.1nmol/L (29.1 – 68.0) and 39.4nmol/L (22.3 – 59.2) or winter; medians 24.9nmol/L (14.3 – 43.1) and 27.1nmol/L (19.9 – 37.6). The proportion of patients’ deficient, insufficient and sufficient in 25-hydroxyvitamin D was the same in both frequent and infrequent exacerbators groups. Exacerbation history was available in a subset of 10 patients before and after treatment with Calcichew D3. There was no difference in actual exacerbation number from year 1 to 2; p = 0.45, or in exacerbation frequency from year 1 to 2; p = 0.38.


25-hydroxyvitamin D deficiency, exacerbation frequency and human rhinovirus exacerbations in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

Quint JK, Donaldson GC, Wassef N, Hurst JR, Thomas M, Wedzicha JA - BMC Pulm Med (2012)

25-hydroxyvitamin D levels in summer and winter in frequent and infrequent exacerbators. Data are presented as median, with the boxes representing the interquartile range and the whiskers representing SD. ○: extreme outliers.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3403978&req=5

Figure 2: 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels in summer and winter in frequent and infrequent exacerbators. Data are presented as median, with the boxes representing the interquartile range and the whiskers representing SD. ○: extreme outliers.
Mentions: Figure 2 shows that there was no difference in 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels between frequent exacerbators (1/3 of the cohort) and infrequent exacerbators in the summer; medians 44.1nmol/L (29.1 – 68.0) and 39.4nmol/L (22.3 – 59.2) or winter; medians 24.9nmol/L (14.3 – 43.1) and 27.1nmol/L (19.9 – 37.6). The proportion of patients’ deficient, insufficient and sufficient in 25-hydroxyvitamin D was the same in both frequent and infrequent exacerbators groups. Exacerbation history was available in a subset of 10 patients before and after treatment with Calcichew D3. There was no difference in actual exacerbation number from year 1 to 2; p = 0.45, or in exacerbation frequency from year 1 to 2; p = 0.38.

Bottom Line: Day length was independently associated with 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels (p = 0.02).HRV positive exacerbations were not associated with lower 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels at exacerbation than exacerbations that did not test positive for HRV; medians 30.0 nmol/L (20.4 - 57.8) and 30.6 nmol/L (19.4 - 48.7).Independent of day length, patients who spend less time outdoors have lower 25-hydroxyvitamin D concentration.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Academic Unit of Respiratory Medicine, University College London Medical School, Royal Free Campus, Rowland Hill Street, London, UK. Jennifer.quint@lshtm.ac.uk

ABSTRACT

Background: 25-hydroxyvitamin D deficiency is associated with COPD and increased susceptibility to infection in the general population.

Methods: We investigated whether COPD patients deficient in 25-hydroxyvitamin D were more likely to be frequent exacerbators, had reduced outdoor activity and were more susceptible to human rhinovirus (HRV) exacerbations than those with insufficient and normal levels. We also investigated whether the frequency of FokI, BsmI and TaqIα 25-hydroxyvitamin D receptor (VDR) polymorphisms differed between frequent and infrequent exacerbators.

Results: There was no difference in 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels between frequent and infrequent exacerbators in the summer; medians 44.1 nmol/L (29.1 - 68.0) and 39.4 nmol/L (22.3 - 59.2) or winter; medians 24.9 nmol/L (14.3 - 43.1) and 27.1 nmol/L (19.9 - 37.6). Patients who spent less time outdoors in the 14 days prior to sampling had lower 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels (p = 0.02). Day length was independently associated with 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels (p = 0.02). There was no difference in 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels between baseline and exacerbation; medians 36.2 nmol/L (IQR 22.4-59.4) and 33.3 nmol/L (23.0-49.7); p = 0.43. HRV positive exacerbations were not associated with lower 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels at exacerbation than exacerbations that did not test positive for HRV; medians 30.0 nmol/L (20.4 - 57.8) and 30.6 nmol/L (19.4 - 48.7). There was no relationship between exacerbation frequency and any VDR polymorphisms (all p > 0.05).

Conclusions: Low 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels in COPD are not associated with frequent exacerbations and do not increase susceptibility to HRV exacerbations. Independent of day length, patients who spend less time outdoors have lower 25-hydroxyvitamin D concentration.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus