Limits...
A reminder of the dangers of trampolining: Spinal cord infarction secondary to hyperextension injury during trampolining.

Rattihalli R, Khan A, Hussain N - J Pediatr Neurosci (2012)

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Paediatric Neurology, Leicester Royal Infirmary, University Hospitals of Leicester NHS Trust, Leicester, UK.

AUTOMATICALLY GENERATED EXCERPT
Please rate it.

Dear Sir, A 15-year-old boy presented to the A and E department with weakness and pins and needles in both arms... On examination, there was patchy sensory loss in both upper limbs, with decreased power of 4/5 MRC... Spinal cord infarction in children has been recognized for several decades, but remains rare and difficult to diagnose... No reports of spinal cord infarct caused due to trampolining were found in the literature... There are several differentials for acute flaccid weakness with sensory symptoms, including acute transverse myelopathy, viral myelitis, Guillain-Barré syndrome, and mass lesions in the spinal canal, which can develop acutely but have discernibly slower evolution than the vascular lesion like spinal cord infarction... Pointing toward the diagnosis were acute presentation, pattern of weakness, sensory symptoms, lacking a sensory level on the body, loss of pain and temperature discrimination with preservation of vibration and joint position sense, and involvement of sphincters... There has been an unprecedented surge in the popularity and sales of trampolines in the UK and in the number of children attending emergency departments with associated injuries... The Royal Society for the Prevention of Accidents provides guidelines for the safe use of trampolines; however it is clear that these are largely not followed... Out of these 59% had no net present and 66% had no supervising adult... A Scottish study which analyzed 50 cases presenting to the accident and emergency department at their hospital over 6 weeks showed that multiple users were present in 80% of the cases, there was lack of safety net in 64% of the cases and there was lack of adult supervision in 46% of the cases... Adult supervision and appropriate safety measures can reduce the risk of injury but the only way to completely obviate them is by avoidance.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Linear high signal within the spinal cord extending from C4/C5 to C7 levels in keeping with acute spinal cord infarction
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3401663&req=5

Figure 1: Linear high signal within the spinal cord extending from C4/C5 to C7 levels in keeping with acute spinal cord infarction

Mentions: A 15-year-old boy presented to the A and E department with weakness and pins and needles in both arms. He gave a history of fall from a household trampoline in hyperextension 3 days before presentation. He reported neck pain on the previous day. This was followed by pins and needles and numbness over the shoulders, which progressed down to the arm and forearms. On examination, there was patchy sensory loss in both upper limbs, with decreased power of 4/5 MRC. Lower limb examination was normal. Decreased power in the upper limbs was worse distally than proximally. There was no spinal tenderness. In the next 24 hours, he developed difficulty in voiding urine, difficulty in walking, worsening gait, and additional sensory involvement of lower limbs. Forty-eight hours after presentation, he was quadriplegic, with power of 3/5 MRC in the limbs, elicitable reflexes, no sensory level. Superficial pain, temperature discrimination was lost bilaterally with relative preservation of light touch, vibration, and position sense, and his bladder was catheterized. Magnetic resonance imaging of the spine showed linear high signal within the spinal cord extending from C4/C5 to C7levels [Figure 1], and was diagnosed as acute spinal cord infarction. After weeks of inpatient neuro-rehabilitation, he is making slow but steady progress.


A reminder of the dangers of trampolining: Spinal cord infarction secondary to hyperextension injury during trampolining.

Rattihalli R, Khan A, Hussain N - J Pediatr Neurosci (2012)

Linear high signal within the spinal cord extending from C4/C5 to C7 levels in keeping with acute spinal cord infarction
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3401663&req=5

Figure 1: Linear high signal within the spinal cord extending from C4/C5 to C7 levels in keeping with acute spinal cord infarction
Mentions: A 15-year-old boy presented to the A and E department with weakness and pins and needles in both arms. He gave a history of fall from a household trampoline in hyperextension 3 days before presentation. He reported neck pain on the previous day. This was followed by pins and needles and numbness over the shoulders, which progressed down to the arm and forearms. On examination, there was patchy sensory loss in both upper limbs, with decreased power of 4/5 MRC. Lower limb examination was normal. Decreased power in the upper limbs was worse distally than proximally. There was no spinal tenderness. In the next 24 hours, he developed difficulty in voiding urine, difficulty in walking, worsening gait, and additional sensory involvement of lower limbs. Forty-eight hours after presentation, he was quadriplegic, with power of 3/5 MRC in the limbs, elicitable reflexes, no sensory level. Superficial pain, temperature discrimination was lost bilaterally with relative preservation of light touch, vibration, and position sense, and his bladder was catheterized. Magnetic resonance imaging of the spine showed linear high signal within the spinal cord extending from C4/C5 to C7levels [Figure 1], and was diagnosed as acute spinal cord infarction. After weeks of inpatient neuro-rehabilitation, he is making slow but steady progress.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Paediatric Neurology, Leicester Royal Infirmary, University Hospitals of Leicester NHS Trust, Leicester, UK.

AUTOMATICALLY GENERATED EXCERPT
Please rate it.

Dear Sir, A 15-year-old boy presented to the A and E department with weakness and pins and needles in both arms... On examination, there was patchy sensory loss in both upper limbs, with decreased power of 4/5 MRC... Spinal cord infarction in children has been recognized for several decades, but remains rare and difficult to diagnose... No reports of spinal cord infarct caused due to trampolining were found in the literature... There are several differentials for acute flaccid weakness with sensory symptoms, including acute transverse myelopathy, viral myelitis, Guillain-Barré syndrome, and mass lesions in the spinal canal, which can develop acutely but have discernibly slower evolution than the vascular lesion like spinal cord infarction... Pointing toward the diagnosis were acute presentation, pattern of weakness, sensory symptoms, lacking a sensory level on the body, loss of pain and temperature discrimination with preservation of vibration and joint position sense, and involvement of sphincters... There has been an unprecedented surge in the popularity and sales of trampolines in the UK and in the number of children attending emergency departments with associated injuries... The Royal Society for the Prevention of Accidents provides guidelines for the safe use of trampolines; however it is clear that these are largely not followed... Out of these 59% had no net present and 66% had no supervising adult... A Scottish study which analyzed 50 cases presenting to the accident and emergency department at their hospital over 6 weeks showed that multiple users were present in 80% of the cases, there was lack of safety net in 64% of the cases and there was lack of adult supervision in 46% of the cases... Adult supervision and appropriate safety measures can reduce the risk of injury but the only way to completely obviate them is by avoidance.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus