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Traumatic rupture of arachnoid cyst with subdural hygroma.

Rajesh A, Bramhaprasad V, Purohit AK - J Pediatr Neurosci (2012)

Bottom Line: Intracranial arachnoid cysts developing in relation to the cerebral hemispheres and middle cranial fossa are usually incidental or asymptomatic.However, most of the clinically active cysts present with seizures because of chronic compression.We herein present a case of an asymptomatic arachnoid cyst with rupture into the subdural space bilaterally and presenting as raised intracranial pressure.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Neurosurgery, Nizam's Institute of Medical Sciences, Punjagutta, Hyderabad, India.

ABSTRACT
Intracranial arachnoid cysts developing in relation to the cerebral hemispheres and middle cranial fossa are usually incidental or asymptomatic. However, most of the clinically active cysts present with seizures because of chronic compression. Presentation as raised intracranial pressure due to cyst rupture into the subdural space is a rare clinical entity. We herein present a case of an asymptomatic arachnoid cyst with rupture into the subdural space bilaterally and presenting as raised intracranial pressure.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Computed tomography scan plain, axial section showing hypodense region compressing the temporal horn with bilateral subdural hygroma
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Figure 1: Computed tomography scan plain, axial section showing hypodense region compressing the temporal horn with bilateral subdural hygroma

Mentions: Computed tomography (CT) scan of the brain showed a left middle fossa, Galassi type 3 arachnoid cyst, with bilateral subdural hygroma/hematoma (chronic), bilateral diffuse cerebral edema, and mass effect causing compression of both frontal horns [Figure 1]. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) of the brain showed bilateral collection in the subdural space, hypo on T1W [Figure 2] and hyper on T2W [Figure 3] images, matching with the intensities of Cerebrospinal Fluid (CSF) with widened Sylvian fissure on the left side and a compressed temporal lobe on the left side, suggestive of arachnoid cyst with subdural hygroma and mass effect.


Traumatic rupture of arachnoid cyst with subdural hygroma.

Rajesh A, Bramhaprasad V, Purohit AK - J Pediatr Neurosci (2012)

Computed tomography scan plain, axial section showing hypodense region compressing the temporal horn with bilateral subdural hygroma
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3401650&req=5

Figure 1: Computed tomography scan plain, axial section showing hypodense region compressing the temporal horn with bilateral subdural hygroma
Mentions: Computed tomography (CT) scan of the brain showed a left middle fossa, Galassi type 3 arachnoid cyst, with bilateral subdural hygroma/hematoma (chronic), bilateral diffuse cerebral edema, and mass effect causing compression of both frontal horns [Figure 1]. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) of the brain showed bilateral collection in the subdural space, hypo on T1W [Figure 2] and hyper on T2W [Figure 3] images, matching with the intensities of Cerebrospinal Fluid (CSF) with widened Sylvian fissure on the left side and a compressed temporal lobe on the left side, suggestive of arachnoid cyst with subdural hygroma and mass effect.

Bottom Line: Intracranial arachnoid cysts developing in relation to the cerebral hemispheres and middle cranial fossa are usually incidental or asymptomatic.However, most of the clinically active cysts present with seizures because of chronic compression.We herein present a case of an asymptomatic arachnoid cyst with rupture into the subdural space bilaterally and presenting as raised intracranial pressure.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Neurosurgery, Nizam's Institute of Medical Sciences, Punjagutta, Hyderabad, India.

ABSTRACT
Intracranial arachnoid cysts developing in relation to the cerebral hemispheres and middle cranial fossa are usually incidental or asymptomatic. However, most of the clinically active cysts present with seizures because of chronic compression. Presentation as raised intracranial pressure due to cyst rupture into the subdural space is a rare clinical entity. We herein present a case of an asymptomatic arachnoid cyst with rupture into the subdural space bilaterally and presenting as raised intracranial pressure.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus