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Severe anemia causing cerebral venous sinus thrombosis in an infant.

Beri S, Khan A, Hussain N, Gosalakkal J - J Pediatr Neurosci (2012)

Bottom Line: It has been linked with cerebral venous sinus thrombosis in the literature.We describe a 9-month-old child who had severe iron deficiency anemia and developed acute venous sinus thrombosis associated with minor infection.Treatment with anticoagulation was partially successful with persistent thrombosis after 3 months.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Paediatric Neurology, Leicester Royal Infirmary, University Hospitals of Leicester NHS Trust, Leicester, UK.

ABSTRACT
Iron deficiency anemia is a common pediatric problem affecting up to 25% children worldwide. It has been linked with cerebral venous sinus thrombosis in the literature. We describe a 9-month-old child who had severe iron deficiency anemia and developed acute venous sinus thrombosis associated with minor infection. Treatment with anticoagulation was partially successful with persistent thrombosis after 3 months. We reviewed the current literature highlighting the association of anemia as a risk factor for development of stroke in children.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Magnetic resonance imaging and MR Venogram done after the acute illness demonstrating bilateral thalamic infarction with hemorrhagic transformation and extensive venous sinus thrombosis
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Figure 1: Magnetic resonance imaging and MR Venogram done after the acute illness demonstrating bilateral thalamic infarction with hemorrhagic transformation and extensive venous sinus thrombosis

Mentions: Child was admitted due to severe anemia and started on oral Iron. He developed mild diarrhea over the next few days which completely settled. Blood transfusion was not required and he was never unwell or in cardiac failure. After 7 days of hospitalization, he suddenly became drowsy and encephalopathic with GCS of 9/15. Urgent CT scan of his brain showed extensive cerebral sinus thrombosis with venous infarction. MRI brain demonstrated bilateral thalamic infarction with hemorrhagic transformation. MR Venogram (MRV) confirmed extensive thrombosis of internal cerebral vein, vein of Galen, straight sinus, sigmoid sinus, and basal vein of Rosenthal [Figure 1].


Severe anemia causing cerebral venous sinus thrombosis in an infant.

Beri S, Khan A, Hussain N, Gosalakkal J - J Pediatr Neurosci (2012)

Magnetic resonance imaging and MR Venogram done after the acute illness demonstrating bilateral thalamic infarction with hemorrhagic transformation and extensive venous sinus thrombosis
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3401649&req=5

Figure 1: Magnetic resonance imaging and MR Venogram done after the acute illness demonstrating bilateral thalamic infarction with hemorrhagic transformation and extensive venous sinus thrombosis
Mentions: Child was admitted due to severe anemia and started on oral Iron. He developed mild diarrhea over the next few days which completely settled. Blood transfusion was not required and he was never unwell or in cardiac failure. After 7 days of hospitalization, he suddenly became drowsy and encephalopathic with GCS of 9/15. Urgent CT scan of his brain showed extensive cerebral sinus thrombosis with venous infarction. MRI brain demonstrated bilateral thalamic infarction with hemorrhagic transformation. MR Venogram (MRV) confirmed extensive thrombosis of internal cerebral vein, vein of Galen, straight sinus, sigmoid sinus, and basal vein of Rosenthal [Figure 1].

Bottom Line: It has been linked with cerebral venous sinus thrombosis in the literature.We describe a 9-month-old child who had severe iron deficiency anemia and developed acute venous sinus thrombosis associated with minor infection.Treatment with anticoagulation was partially successful with persistent thrombosis after 3 months.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Paediatric Neurology, Leicester Royal Infirmary, University Hospitals of Leicester NHS Trust, Leicester, UK.

ABSTRACT
Iron deficiency anemia is a common pediatric problem affecting up to 25% children worldwide. It has been linked with cerebral venous sinus thrombosis in the literature. We describe a 9-month-old child who had severe iron deficiency anemia and developed acute venous sinus thrombosis associated with minor infection. Treatment with anticoagulation was partially successful with persistent thrombosis after 3 months. We reviewed the current literature highlighting the association of anemia as a risk factor for development of stroke in children.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus