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Concurrent adaptation to four different visual rotations.

Thomas M, Bock O - Exp Brain Res (2012)

Bottom Line: Furthermore, aftereffects of adaptation to ±30° rotation were significantly greater than of adaptation to ±60° rotation.We conclude that the human sensorimotor system is able to concurrently adapt to four different visual distortions when they are cued by different contexts.However, the results of aftereffects are ambiguous: Recalibration could be based on at least four parallel modules.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institute of Physiology and Anatomy, German Sport University Cologne, Am Sportpark Müngersdorf 6, 50933 Cologne, Germany. thomas@dshs-koeln.de

ABSTRACT
The human sensorimotor system can concurrently adapt to two different distortions without interference when the distortions are cued by different contexts. We investigated whether this holds with four distortions as well. Subjects were exposed to an interlaced sequence of +30°, -30°, +60°, and -60° visuomotor rotations as the adaptation phase, cued by combinations of workspace location and by the arm used. Adaptation phase was followed by two episodes in each condition without any distortion testing the aftereffects. Results showed that the error at the onset of adaptation gradually decreased during adaptation to all four distortions without any sign of interference between the conditions. Furthermore, aftereffects of adaptation to ±30° rotation were significantly greater than of adaptation to ±60° rotation. We conclude that the human sensorimotor system is able to concurrently adapt to four different visual distortions when they are cued by different contexts. However, the results of aftereffects are ambiguous: Recalibration could be based on at least four parallel modules.

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Time course of mean error during the de-adaptation phase separated for each de-adaptation condition. Symbols represent across subject means and error bars standard deviations. Inset The magnitude of the aftereffect for each adaptation condition
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Fig4: Time course of mean error during the de-adaptation phase separated for each de-adaptation condition. Symbols represent across subject means and error bars standard deviations. Inset The magnitude of the aftereffect for each adaptation condition

Mentions: Aftereffects averaged 42 % across subjects and distortions. Figure 4 shows that aftereffects were about 50 % larger for 30° as compared to 60° rotations, irrespective of their direction. Accordingly, ANOVA yielded a significant effect only for magnitude (F(1,44) = 18.92; p < 0.001).Fig. 4


Concurrent adaptation to four different visual rotations.

Thomas M, Bock O - Exp Brain Res (2012)

Time course of mean error during the de-adaptation phase separated for each de-adaptation condition. Symbols represent across subject means and error bars standard deviations. Inset The magnitude of the aftereffect for each adaptation condition
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

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getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3401298&req=5

Fig4: Time course of mean error during the de-adaptation phase separated for each de-adaptation condition. Symbols represent across subject means and error bars standard deviations. Inset The magnitude of the aftereffect for each adaptation condition
Mentions: Aftereffects averaged 42 % across subjects and distortions. Figure 4 shows that aftereffects were about 50 % larger for 30° as compared to 60° rotations, irrespective of their direction. Accordingly, ANOVA yielded a significant effect only for magnitude (F(1,44) = 18.92; p < 0.001).Fig. 4

Bottom Line: Furthermore, aftereffects of adaptation to ±30° rotation were significantly greater than of adaptation to ±60° rotation.We conclude that the human sensorimotor system is able to concurrently adapt to four different visual distortions when they are cued by different contexts.However, the results of aftereffects are ambiguous: Recalibration could be based on at least four parallel modules.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institute of Physiology and Anatomy, German Sport University Cologne, Am Sportpark Müngersdorf 6, 50933 Cologne, Germany. thomas@dshs-koeln.de

ABSTRACT
The human sensorimotor system can concurrently adapt to two different distortions without interference when the distortions are cued by different contexts. We investigated whether this holds with four distortions as well. Subjects were exposed to an interlaced sequence of +30°, -30°, +60°, and -60° visuomotor rotations as the adaptation phase, cued by combinations of workspace location and by the arm used. Adaptation phase was followed by two episodes in each condition without any distortion testing the aftereffects. Results showed that the error at the onset of adaptation gradually decreased during adaptation to all four distortions without any sign of interference between the conditions. Furthermore, aftereffects of adaptation to ±30° rotation were significantly greater than of adaptation to ±60° rotation. We conclude that the human sensorimotor system is able to concurrently adapt to four different visual distortions when they are cued by different contexts. However, the results of aftereffects are ambiguous: Recalibration could be based on at least four parallel modules.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus