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Localization of oleuropeyl glucose esters and a flavanone to secretory cavities of Myrtaceae.

Heskes AM, Goodger JQ, Tsegay S, Quach T, Williams SJ, Woodrow IE - PLoS ONE (2012)

Bottom Line: Baker.All trees contained both compounds, which were positively correlated with total essential oil concentration.The localization of oleuropeyl glucose esters to a specific and isolatable tissue type has the potential to aid in future elucidation of function and biosynthesis.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Botany, The University of Melbourne, Victoria, Australia. a.heskes@student.unimelb.edu.au

ABSTRACT
We report the widespread occurrence of structurally diverse oleuropeyl glucose esters, including the new diester eucaglobulin B, localized specifically to the essential oil secretory cavities of myrtaceous species. Clear taxonomic patterns in the composition of cavity extracts within the genus Eucalyptus are shown with species from subgenus Symphyomyrtus dominated by oleuropeyl glucose esters and species from subgenus Eucalyptus dominated instead by the flavanone, pinocembrin. We also examined the intra-species occurrence of oleuropeyl glucose esters by quantifying the abundant constituents cuniloside B and froggattiside A in trees from two populations of Eucalyptus polybractea R.T. Baker. All trees contained both compounds, which were positively correlated with total essential oil concentration. This apparent ubiquity of oleuropeyl glucose esters at both intra- and inter-specific levels in Eucalyptus is indicative of important physiological or ecological functions. The significance of their prevalence and the sequestration of these esters and also pinocembrin to the extracellular domain of secretory cavities is discussed in light of their potential biological activities and our findings that they are spatially segregated to the exterior of cavity lumina. The localization of oleuropeyl glucose esters to a specific and isolatable tissue type has the potential to aid in future elucidation of function and biosynthesis.

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Relationship between total oil (mg g−1 DW) and non-volatiles (combined cuniloside B (1) and froggattiside A (2); mg g−1 DW) for two populations of E. polybractea (closed circles population A; open circles population B).Linear regressions were significant with equations of non-volatiles = 2.44+0.15×total oil for Population A (solid line; r2 = 0.80; F = 96.23, P = 0.00) and non-volatile  = 2.40+0.14×total oil for Population B (dashed line; r2 = 0.73; F = 70.99, P = 0.00).
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pone-0040856-g003: Relationship between total oil (mg g−1 DW) and non-volatiles (combined cuniloside B (1) and froggattiside A (2); mg g−1 DW) for two populations of E. polybractea (closed circles population A; open circles population B).Linear regressions were significant with equations of non-volatiles = 2.44+0.15×total oil for Population A (solid line; r2 = 0.80; F = 96.23, P = 0.00) and non-volatile  = 2.40+0.14×total oil for Population B (dashed line; r2 = 0.73; F = 70.99, P = 0.00).

Mentions: Leaf samples from two E. polybractea populations were analysed for foliar non-volatiles (based on HPLC quantification of 1 and 2 only) and total essential oil content (GC-FID). Mean (± SE) total oil in population A was 89.7±6.5 mg g−1 dry weight (DW) and in population B was 76.7±6.2 mg g−1 DW. The GC profile of all trees was dominated by 1,8-cineole with respective mean percentage abundances (±SE) of 78.5±0.8 and 71.9±1.4. All trees tested contained both 1 and 2 with mean values (± SE) of 14.8±1.0 and 1.5±0.1 mg g−1 DW, respectively for population A and 11.6±0.9 and 1.6±0.2 mg g−1 DW, respectively for population B. Strong positive correlations were found between the concentration of 1 and 2 and the concentration of oil on a dry leaf basis in both populations (r2 = 0.80 and 0.73 in populations A and B, respectively; Fig. 3).


Localization of oleuropeyl glucose esters and a flavanone to secretory cavities of Myrtaceae.

Heskes AM, Goodger JQ, Tsegay S, Quach T, Williams SJ, Woodrow IE - PLoS ONE (2012)

Relationship between total oil (mg g−1 DW) and non-volatiles (combined cuniloside B (1) and froggattiside A (2); mg g−1 DW) for two populations of E. polybractea (closed circles population A; open circles population B).Linear regressions were significant with equations of non-volatiles = 2.44+0.15×total oil for Population A (solid line; r2 = 0.80; F = 96.23, P = 0.00) and non-volatile  = 2.40+0.14×total oil for Population B (dashed line; r2 = 0.73; F = 70.99, P = 0.00).
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Related In: Results  -  Collection

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getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3401227&req=5

pone-0040856-g003: Relationship between total oil (mg g−1 DW) and non-volatiles (combined cuniloside B (1) and froggattiside A (2); mg g−1 DW) for two populations of E. polybractea (closed circles population A; open circles population B).Linear regressions were significant with equations of non-volatiles = 2.44+0.15×total oil for Population A (solid line; r2 = 0.80; F = 96.23, P = 0.00) and non-volatile  = 2.40+0.14×total oil for Population B (dashed line; r2 = 0.73; F = 70.99, P = 0.00).
Mentions: Leaf samples from two E. polybractea populations were analysed for foliar non-volatiles (based on HPLC quantification of 1 and 2 only) and total essential oil content (GC-FID). Mean (± SE) total oil in population A was 89.7±6.5 mg g−1 dry weight (DW) and in population B was 76.7±6.2 mg g−1 DW. The GC profile of all trees was dominated by 1,8-cineole with respective mean percentage abundances (±SE) of 78.5±0.8 and 71.9±1.4. All trees tested contained both 1 and 2 with mean values (± SE) of 14.8±1.0 and 1.5±0.1 mg g−1 DW, respectively for population A and 11.6±0.9 and 1.6±0.2 mg g−1 DW, respectively for population B. Strong positive correlations were found between the concentration of 1 and 2 and the concentration of oil on a dry leaf basis in both populations (r2 = 0.80 and 0.73 in populations A and B, respectively; Fig. 3).

Bottom Line: Baker.All trees contained both compounds, which were positively correlated with total essential oil concentration.The localization of oleuropeyl glucose esters to a specific and isolatable tissue type has the potential to aid in future elucidation of function and biosynthesis.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Botany, The University of Melbourne, Victoria, Australia. a.heskes@student.unimelb.edu.au

ABSTRACT
We report the widespread occurrence of structurally diverse oleuropeyl glucose esters, including the new diester eucaglobulin B, localized specifically to the essential oil secretory cavities of myrtaceous species. Clear taxonomic patterns in the composition of cavity extracts within the genus Eucalyptus are shown with species from subgenus Symphyomyrtus dominated by oleuropeyl glucose esters and species from subgenus Eucalyptus dominated instead by the flavanone, pinocembrin. We also examined the intra-species occurrence of oleuropeyl glucose esters by quantifying the abundant constituents cuniloside B and froggattiside A in trees from two populations of Eucalyptus polybractea R.T. Baker. All trees contained both compounds, which were positively correlated with total essential oil concentration. This apparent ubiquity of oleuropeyl glucose esters at both intra- and inter-specific levels in Eucalyptus is indicative of important physiological or ecological functions. The significance of their prevalence and the sequestration of these esters and also pinocembrin to the extracellular domain of secretory cavities is discussed in light of their potential biological activities and our findings that they are spatially segregated to the exterior of cavity lumina. The localization of oleuropeyl glucose esters to a specific and isolatable tissue type has the potential to aid in future elucidation of function and biosynthesis.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus