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When time and numerosity interfere: the longer the more, and the more the longer.

Javadi AH, Aichelburg C - PLoS ONE (2012)

Bottom Line: We speculated that this one-way interference is confounded by the magnitudes used in the studies.Results confirmed our hypothesis.A positive correlation between duration of presentation and judged numerosity as well as a positive correlation between the number of items and judged duration of presentation was found.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Section of Systems Neuroscience, Technische Universit├Ąt Dresden, Dresden, Germany. a.h.javadi@gmail.com

ABSTRACT
There is strong evidence that magnitudes in different dimensions can interfere. A majority of previous studies on the interaction of temporal magnitudes on numerosity showed no interfering effect, while many studies have reported the interference of numerosity on judgement of temporal magnitudes. We speculated that this one-way interference is confounded by the magnitudes used in the studies. We used a methodology that allowed us to study this interaction reciprocally. Moreover, we selected magnitudes for two dimensions that enabled us to detect their interfering effects. Participants had to either judge which of two successive sets of items was more numerous (numerosity judgement task), or which set of items was presented longer (duration judgement task). We hypothesised that a longer presentation of a set will be judged as being more numerous, and vice versa, a more numerous set will be judged as being presented longer. Results confirmed our hypothesis. A positive correlation between duration of presentation and judged numerosity as well as a positive correlation between the number of items and judged duration of presentation was found. This observation supports the idea that duration and numerosity judgements are not completely independent and implies the existence of (partly) generalised and abstract components in the magnitude representations.

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Procedure of a trial.The number of items in this figure is only for illustration, see Figure 1 for details of magnitudes used.
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pone-0041496-g002: Procedure of a trial.The number of items in this figure is only for illustration, see Figure 1 for details of magnitudes used.

Mentions: The procedure of one trial is shown in Figure 2. The presentation variables (n1, n2, t1 and t2) were randomly selected from combinations shown in Figure 1(a, b).


When time and numerosity interfere: the longer the more, and the more the longer.

Javadi AH, Aichelburg C - PLoS ONE (2012)

Procedure of a trial.The number of items in this figure is only for illustration, see Figure 1 for details of magnitudes used.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3401119&req=5

pone-0041496-g002: Procedure of a trial.The number of items in this figure is only for illustration, see Figure 1 for details of magnitudes used.
Mentions: The procedure of one trial is shown in Figure 2. The presentation variables (n1, n2, t1 and t2) were randomly selected from combinations shown in Figure 1(a, b).

Bottom Line: We speculated that this one-way interference is confounded by the magnitudes used in the studies.Results confirmed our hypothesis.A positive correlation between duration of presentation and judged numerosity as well as a positive correlation between the number of items and judged duration of presentation was found.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Section of Systems Neuroscience, Technische Universit├Ąt Dresden, Dresden, Germany. a.h.javadi@gmail.com

ABSTRACT
There is strong evidence that magnitudes in different dimensions can interfere. A majority of previous studies on the interaction of temporal magnitudes on numerosity showed no interfering effect, while many studies have reported the interference of numerosity on judgement of temporal magnitudes. We speculated that this one-way interference is confounded by the magnitudes used in the studies. We used a methodology that allowed us to study this interaction reciprocally. Moreover, we selected magnitudes for two dimensions that enabled us to detect their interfering effects. Participants had to either judge which of two successive sets of items was more numerous (numerosity judgement task), or which set of items was presented longer (duration judgement task). We hypothesised that a longer presentation of a set will be judged as being more numerous, and vice versa, a more numerous set will be judged as being presented longer. Results confirmed our hypothesis. A positive correlation between duration of presentation and judged numerosity as well as a positive correlation between the number of items and judged duration of presentation was found. This observation supports the idea that duration and numerosity judgements are not completely independent and implies the existence of (partly) generalised and abstract components in the magnitude representations.

Show MeSH