Limits...
Effect of lower limb strength on falls and balance of the elderly.

Cho KH, Bok SK, Kim YJ, Hwang SL - Ann Rehabil Med (2012)

Bottom Line: The questionnaire demonstrated no significant differences between two groups.The "Chair stand test" showed a significantly less for the "Fallers" (p<0.05).The stability index was significantly greater in the "Fallers" group (p<0.05).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, School of Medicine, Chungnam National University, Daejeon 301-721, Korea.

ABSTRACT

Objective: To assess the effect of lower limb strength on falls and balance in community-dwelling elderly persons by a health status questionnaire, evaluation of lower limb strength and balance.

Method: A total of 86 subjects (age 69.8±5.3) were categorized into one of two groups, "Fallers" and "Non-fallers". Thirty one participants who had reported the experience of having fallen unexpectedly at least once in the past year were assigned into the group "Fallers", and the remaining 55 subjects having no fall history in the past year, "Non-fallers". A self-assessment questionnaire was taken. Lower limb strength was measured by a "Chair stand test". Balance was measured by the stability index of the fall risk test protocol of Balance System SD® (Biodex, New York, USA). The differences between the two groups were compared and the correlation between lower limb strength and balance were analyzed.

Results: The questionnaire demonstrated no significant differences between two groups. The "Chair stand test" showed a significantly less for the "Fallers" (p<0.05). The stability index was significantly greater in the "Fallers" group (p<0.05). There was a moderate negative correlation between the "Chair stand test" and the "Stability index" (R=-0.576, p<0.01).

Conclusion: This study suggests that the "Chair stand test" is a useful screening process for lower limb strength which correlates to risk for falls and balance in the elderly.

No MeSH data available.


Fall risk test protocol of Balance System SD® (Biodex, New York, USA). (A) Report of fall risk test protocol. (B) Formula to calculate "Stability index". YRS: Years.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3400879&req=5

Figure 2: Fall risk test protocol of Balance System SD® (Biodex, New York, USA). (A) Report of fall risk test protocol. (B) Formula to calculate "Stability index". YRS: Years.

Mentions: To assess the balance function, the falls risk test protocol of Balance System SD® was used and the "Stability index" was calculated. The subjects got on a round 55 cm diameter platform connected to a desktop and monitor with eye opened. For the safety of subjects, they are allowed to hold a handle. Each session lasted of 20 seconds, completed a total of 3 times trial and platform was designed to be flexible without fixed state to induce the change of center of gravity therefore we could evaluate the subjects' dynamic balance function and expressed it as balance measure (Fig. 2). The "Stability index" was calculated by a formula described below (Fig. 2) and higher score means poorer balance function.


Effect of lower limb strength on falls and balance of the elderly.

Cho KH, Bok SK, Kim YJ, Hwang SL - Ann Rehabil Med (2012)

Fall risk test protocol of Balance System SD® (Biodex, New York, USA). (A) Report of fall risk test protocol. (B) Formula to calculate "Stability index". YRS: Years.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3400879&req=5

Figure 2: Fall risk test protocol of Balance System SD® (Biodex, New York, USA). (A) Report of fall risk test protocol. (B) Formula to calculate "Stability index". YRS: Years.
Mentions: To assess the balance function, the falls risk test protocol of Balance System SD® was used and the "Stability index" was calculated. The subjects got on a round 55 cm diameter platform connected to a desktop and monitor with eye opened. For the safety of subjects, they are allowed to hold a handle. Each session lasted of 20 seconds, completed a total of 3 times trial and platform was designed to be flexible without fixed state to induce the change of center of gravity therefore we could evaluate the subjects' dynamic balance function and expressed it as balance measure (Fig. 2). The "Stability index" was calculated by a formula described below (Fig. 2) and higher score means poorer balance function.

Bottom Line: The questionnaire demonstrated no significant differences between two groups.The "Chair stand test" showed a significantly less for the "Fallers" (p<0.05).The stability index was significantly greater in the "Fallers" group (p<0.05).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, School of Medicine, Chungnam National University, Daejeon 301-721, Korea.

ABSTRACT

Objective: To assess the effect of lower limb strength on falls and balance in community-dwelling elderly persons by a health status questionnaire, evaluation of lower limb strength and balance.

Method: A total of 86 subjects (age 69.8±5.3) were categorized into one of two groups, "Fallers" and "Non-fallers". Thirty one participants who had reported the experience of having fallen unexpectedly at least once in the past year were assigned into the group "Fallers", and the remaining 55 subjects having no fall history in the past year, "Non-fallers". A self-assessment questionnaire was taken. Lower limb strength was measured by a "Chair stand test". Balance was measured by the stability index of the fall risk test protocol of Balance System SD® (Biodex, New York, USA). The differences between the two groups were compared and the correlation between lower limb strength and balance were analyzed.

Results: The questionnaire demonstrated no significant differences between two groups. The "Chair stand test" showed a significantly less for the "Fallers" (p<0.05). The stability index was significantly greater in the "Fallers" group (p<0.05). There was a moderate negative correlation between the "Chair stand test" and the "Stability index" (R=-0.576, p<0.01).

Conclusion: This study suggests that the "Chair stand test" is a useful screening process for lower limb strength which correlates to risk for falls and balance in the elderly.

No MeSH data available.