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Subtypes and Symptomatology of Irritable Bowel Syndrome in Children and Adolescents: A School-based Survey Using Rome III Criteria.

Rajindrajith S, Devanarayana NM - J Neurogastroenterol Motil (2012)

Bottom Line: Bloating, flatulence, burping, headache and limb pain were significantly higher in affected children (P < 0.05).This study highlights the distribution of IBS subtypes among Sri Lankan children and adolescents and its female preponderance.This study also shows a higher prevalence of other intestinal-related and extraintestinal somatic symptoms among affected children.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Faculty of Medicine, University of Kelaniya, Ragama, Sri Lanka.

ABSTRACT

Background/aims: This study was conducted with objectives of assessing subtypes of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) in children aged 10-16 years, their symptomatology and gender differences.

Methods: For this survey, 107 children who fulfilled Rome III criteria for IBS and 1,610 healthy controls were recruited from 8 randomly selected schools, in 4 provinces in Sri Lanka. Data was collected using a previously validated, self administered questionnaire.

Results: Constipation predominant, diarrhea predominant and mixed type IBS were almost equally distributed (27%-28%), while unsubtyped IBS had a lower prevalence (17.8%). IBS was more common in girls (59.8% vs 40.2% in boys, P = 0.001). Bloating, flatulence, burping, headache and limb pain were significantly higher in affected children (P < 0.05).

Conclusions: This study highlights the distribution of IBS subtypes among Sri Lankan children and adolescents and its female preponderance. This study also shows a higher prevalence of other intestinal-related and extraintestinal somatic symptoms among affected children.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Mean predicted probabilities of irritable bowel syndrome according to age and sex. *P < 0.01, Girls vs boys (unpaired t test).
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Figure 1: Mean predicted probabilities of irritable bowel syndrome according to age and sex. *P < 0.01, Girls vs boys (unpaired t test).

Mentions: Table 2 shows the distribution of IBS subtypes according to sex. When mean predicted probabilities of IBS were plotted against the age (Figure), IBS was significantly higher among girls in all age groups (P < 0.01). There was a significant negative correlation between probability of developing IBS and age, in both genders (Figure).


Subtypes and Symptomatology of Irritable Bowel Syndrome in Children and Adolescents: A School-based Survey Using Rome III Criteria.

Rajindrajith S, Devanarayana NM - J Neurogastroenterol Motil (2012)

Mean predicted probabilities of irritable bowel syndrome according to age and sex. *P < 0.01, Girls vs boys (unpaired t test).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3400818&req=5

Figure 1: Mean predicted probabilities of irritable bowel syndrome according to age and sex. *P < 0.01, Girls vs boys (unpaired t test).
Mentions: Table 2 shows the distribution of IBS subtypes according to sex. When mean predicted probabilities of IBS were plotted against the age (Figure), IBS was significantly higher among girls in all age groups (P < 0.01). There was a significant negative correlation between probability of developing IBS and age, in both genders (Figure).

Bottom Line: Bloating, flatulence, burping, headache and limb pain were significantly higher in affected children (P < 0.05).This study highlights the distribution of IBS subtypes among Sri Lankan children and adolescents and its female preponderance.This study also shows a higher prevalence of other intestinal-related and extraintestinal somatic symptoms among affected children.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Faculty of Medicine, University of Kelaniya, Ragama, Sri Lanka.

ABSTRACT

Background/aims: This study was conducted with objectives of assessing subtypes of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) in children aged 10-16 years, their symptomatology and gender differences.

Methods: For this survey, 107 children who fulfilled Rome III criteria for IBS and 1,610 healthy controls were recruited from 8 randomly selected schools, in 4 provinces in Sri Lanka. Data was collected using a previously validated, self administered questionnaire.

Results: Constipation predominant, diarrhea predominant and mixed type IBS were almost equally distributed (27%-28%), while unsubtyped IBS had a lower prevalence (17.8%). IBS was more common in girls (59.8% vs 40.2% in boys, P = 0.001). Bloating, flatulence, burping, headache and limb pain were significantly higher in affected children (P < 0.05).

Conclusions: This study highlights the distribution of IBS subtypes among Sri Lankan children and adolescents and its female preponderance. This study also shows a higher prevalence of other intestinal-related and extraintestinal somatic symptoms among affected children.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus