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Development of multisensory reweighting is impaired for quiet stance control in children with developmental coordination disorder (DCD).

Bair WN, Kiemel T, Jeka JJ, Clark JE - PLoS ONE (2012)

Bottom Line: Empirical quantification of reweighting significantly advances our understanding of its developmental onset and improves the characterization of its difference in children with DCD compared to their typically developing (TD) peers.Their data were compared to data on TD children (4.2 to 10.8 years) from a previous study.The lack of multisensory fusion supports the notion that optimal multisensory integration is a slow developmental process and is vulnerable in children with DCD.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Physical Therapy and Rehabilitation Science, University of Maryland, Baltimore, Baltimore, Maryland, United States of America. wnbair@gmail.com

ABSTRACT

Background: Developmental Coordination Disorder (DCD) is a leading movement disorder in children that commonly involves poor postural control. Multisensory integration deficit, especially the inability to adaptively reweight to changing sensory conditions, has been proposed as a possible mechanism but with insufficient characterization. Empirical quantification of reweighting significantly advances our understanding of its developmental onset and improves the characterization of its difference in children with DCD compared to their typically developing (TD) peers.

Methodology/principal findings: Twenty children with DCD (6.6 to 11.8 years) were tested with a protocol in which visual scene and touch bar simultaneously oscillateded medio-laterally at different frequencies and various amplitudes. Their data were compared to data on TD children (4.2 to 10.8 years) from a previous study. Gains and phases were calculated for medio-lateral responses of the head and center of mass to both sensory stimuli. Gains and phases were simultaneously fitted by linear functions of age for each amplitude condition, segment, modality and group. Fitted gains and phases at two comparison ages (6.6 and 10.8 years) were tested for reweighting within each group and for group differences. Children with DCD reweight touch and vision at a later age (10.8 years) than their TD peers (4.2 years). Children with DCD demonstrate a weak visual reweighting, no advanced multisensory fusion and phase lags larger than those of TD children in response to both touch and vision.

Conclusions/significance: Two developmental perspectives, postural body scheme and dorsal stream development, are provided to explain the weak vision reweighting. The lack of multisensory fusion supports the notion that optimal multisensory integration is a slow developmental process and is vulnerable in children with DCD.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Fitted CoM phases at upper (10.8 years) and lower (6.6 years) comparison ages.Each fitted phase with its corresponding standard error was extracted from a linear model fit (exemplified in Figure 4B) for the specified condition, segment, sensory drive and comparison age. Symbol notations, legends for statistical significance are the same as in Figure 5.
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pone-0040932-g007: Fitted CoM phases at upper (10.8 years) and lower (6.6 years) comparison ages.Each fitted phase with its corresponding standard error was extracted from a linear model fit (exemplified in Figure 4B) for the specified condition, segment, sensory drive and comparison age. Symbol notations, legends for statistical significance are the same as in Figure 5.

Mentions: The linear fit is for each group of children for one condition. Here the gains (A) and phases (B) are from Head responses to Tdrive in a T8V2 condition. Gains (A) and phases (B) from 41 TD children (filled markers) and from 20 children with DCD (open face markers) with fitted gain lines and fitted phase lines are plotted with associated standard errors calculated from bootstrapping. The age range used for model fitting is from 4.2 to 10.8 years of age for the TD children and from 6.6 to 11.8 years for children with DCD. We evaluate the model fitting for both groups at a lower comparison age of 6.6 years and an upper comparison age of 10.8 years as shown in the following Figures 5, 6, 7 and 8. Note that children with DCD showed delayed phase of postural response to Tdrive comparing to their TD peers.


Development of multisensory reweighting is impaired for quiet stance control in children with developmental coordination disorder (DCD).

Bair WN, Kiemel T, Jeka JJ, Clark JE - PLoS ONE (2012)

Fitted CoM phases at upper (10.8 years) and lower (6.6 years) comparison ages.Each fitted phase with its corresponding standard error was extracted from a linear model fit (exemplified in Figure 4B) for the specified condition, segment, sensory drive and comparison age. Symbol notations, legends for statistical significance are the same as in Figure 5.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3399799&req=5

pone-0040932-g007: Fitted CoM phases at upper (10.8 years) and lower (6.6 years) comparison ages.Each fitted phase with its corresponding standard error was extracted from a linear model fit (exemplified in Figure 4B) for the specified condition, segment, sensory drive and comparison age. Symbol notations, legends for statistical significance are the same as in Figure 5.
Mentions: The linear fit is for each group of children for one condition. Here the gains (A) and phases (B) are from Head responses to Tdrive in a T8V2 condition. Gains (A) and phases (B) from 41 TD children (filled markers) and from 20 children with DCD (open face markers) with fitted gain lines and fitted phase lines are plotted with associated standard errors calculated from bootstrapping. The age range used for model fitting is from 4.2 to 10.8 years of age for the TD children and from 6.6 to 11.8 years for children with DCD. We evaluate the model fitting for both groups at a lower comparison age of 6.6 years and an upper comparison age of 10.8 years as shown in the following Figures 5, 6, 7 and 8. Note that children with DCD showed delayed phase of postural response to Tdrive comparing to their TD peers.

Bottom Line: Empirical quantification of reweighting significantly advances our understanding of its developmental onset and improves the characterization of its difference in children with DCD compared to their typically developing (TD) peers.Their data were compared to data on TD children (4.2 to 10.8 years) from a previous study.The lack of multisensory fusion supports the notion that optimal multisensory integration is a slow developmental process and is vulnerable in children with DCD.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Physical Therapy and Rehabilitation Science, University of Maryland, Baltimore, Baltimore, Maryland, United States of America. wnbair@gmail.com

ABSTRACT

Background: Developmental Coordination Disorder (DCD) is a leading movement disorder in children that commonly involves poor postural control. Multisensory integration deficit, especially the inability to adaptively reweight to changing sensory conditions, has been proposed as a possible mechanism but with insufficient characterization. Empirical quantification of reweighting significantly advances our understanding of its developmental onset and improves the characterization of its difference in children with DCD compared to their typically developing (TD) peers.

Methodology/principal findings: Twenty children with DCD (6.6 to 11.8 years) were tested with a protocol in which visual scene and touch bar simultaneously oscillateded medio-laterally at different frequencies and various amplitudes. Their data were compared to data on TD children (4.2 to 10.8 years) from a previous study. Gains and phases were calculated for medio-lateral responses of the head and center of mass to both sensory stimuli. Gains and phases were simultaneously fitted by linear functions of age for each amplitude condition, segment, modality and group. Fitted gains and phases at two comparison ages (6.6 and 10.8 years) were tested for reweighting within each group and for group differences. Children with DCD reweight touch and vision at a later age (10.8 years) than their TD peers (4.2 years). Children with DCD demonstrate a weak visual reweighting, no advanced multisensory fusion and phase lags larger than those of TD children in response to both touch and vision.

Conclusions/significance: Two developmental perspectives, postural body scheme and dorsal stream development, are provided to explain the weak vision reweighting. The lack of multisensory fusion supports the notion that optimal multisensory integration is a slow developmental process and is vulnerable in children with DCD.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus