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In-lab three-dimensional printing: an inexpensive tool for experimentation and visualization for the field of organogenesis.

Partridge R, Conlisk N, Davies JA - Organogenesis (2012)

Bottom Line: More recent improvements in this technology including confocal microscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and optical projection tomography (OPT) have enhanced the quality of the resultant image.As well as being useful for visualization, 3-D printers are capable of rapidly and cost-effectively producing custom-made structures for use within the laboratory.We here describe the advantages of producing hardware for a tissue culture system using an inexpensive in-lab printer.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Centre for Integrative Physiology, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, UK. Roland.Partridge@ed.ac.uk

ABSTRACT
The development of the microscope in 1590 by Zacharias Janssenby and Hans Lippershey gave the world a new way of visualizing details of morphogenesis and development. More recent improvements in this technology including confocal microscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and optical projection tomography (OPT) have enhanced the quality of the resultant image. These technologies also allow a representation to be made of a developing tissue's three-dimensional (3-D) form. With all these techniques however, the image is delivered on a flat two-dimensional (2-D) screen. 3-D printing represents an exciting potential to reproduce the image not simply on a flat screen, but in a physical, palpable three-dimensional structure. Here we explore the scope that this holds for exploring and interacting with the structure of a developing organ in an entirely novel way. As well as being useful for visualization, 3-D printers are capable of rapidly and cost-effectively producing custom-made structures for use within the laboratory. We here describe the advantages of producing hardware for a tissue culture system using an inexpensive in-lab printer.

Show MeSH
Figure 3. Red ABS printed branching ureteric tree from an E15.5 mouse kidney with support structure removed. The branching pattern is clearly seen and can be explored in three dimensions.
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Figure 3: Figure 3. Red ABS printed branching ureteric tree from an E15.5 mouse kidney with support structure removed. The branching pattern is clearly seen and can be explored in three dimensions.

Mentions: The result of this printing is illustrated in Figure 3. In this large 3-D model, the features of ureteric bud development, such as the frequent occurrence of three-way branch events, are immediately obvious. Whether three-way branching events are common or rare has been the subject of contention by people examining sections of fixed material.21-24 It was settled, on the side of the events being quite common, only comparatively recently by time-lapse recordings of developing GFP-expressing ureteric buds.25 Had a facility for 3-D printing been available many years ago, the controversy would probably never have arisen. The ability to make 3-D models from OPT and similar data sets, of both wild-type and mutant embryos, may therefore lead to much more rapid insight than emerges from interacting with data sets on a 2-D computer screen. As well as providing a means of making models from real data sets, 3-D printing could also be used to visualize the output of computer models of development or of congenital disease.


In-lab three-dimensional printing: an inexpensive tool for experimentation and visualization for the field of organogenesis.

Partridge R, Conlisk N, Davies JA - Organogenesis (2012)

Figure 3. Red ABS printed branching ureteric tree from an E15.5 mouse kidney with support structure removed. The branching pattern is clearly seen and can be explored in three dimensions.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3399707&req=5

Figure 3: Figure 3. Red ABS printed branching ureteric tree from an E15.5 mouse kidney with support structure removed. The branching pattern is clearly seen and can be explored in three dimensions.
Mentions: The result of this printing is illustrated in Figure 3. In this large 3-D model, the features of ureteric bud development, such as the frequent occurrence of three-way branch events, are immediately obvious. Whether three-way branching events are common or rare has been the subject of contention by people examining sections of fixed material.21-24 It was settled, on the side of the events being quite common, only comparatively recently by time-lapse recordings of developing GFP-expressing ureteric buds.25 Had a facility for 3-D printing been available many years ago, the controversy would probably never have arisen. The ability to make 3-D models from OPT and similar data sets, of both wild-type and mutant embryos, may therefore lead to much more rapid insight than emerges from interacting with data sets on a 2-D computer screen. As well as providing a means of making models from real data sets, 3-D printing could also be used to visualize the output of computer models of development or of congenital disease.

Bottom Line: More recent improvements in this technology including confocal microscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and optical projection tomography (OPT) have enhanced the quality of the resultant image.As well as being useful for visualization, 3-D printers are capable of rapidly and cost-effectively producing custom-made structures for use within the laboratory.We here describe the advantages of producing hardware for a tissue culture system using an inexpensive in-lab printer.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Centre for Integrative Physiology, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, UK. Roland.Partridge@ed.ac.uk

ABSTRACT
The development of the microscope in 1590 by Zacharias Janssenby and Hans Lippershey gave the world a new way of visualizing details of morphogenesis and development. More recent improvements in this technology including confocal microscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and optical projection tomography (OPT) have enhanced the quality of the resultant image. These technologies also allow a representation to be made of a developing tissue's three-dimensional (3-D) form. With all these techniques however, the image is delivered on a flat two-dimensional (2-D) screen. 3-D printing represents an exciting potential to reproduce the image not simply on a flat screen, but in a physical, palpable three-dimensional structure. Here we explore the scope that this holds for exploring and interacting with the structure of a developing organ in an entirely novel way. As well as being useful for visualization, 3-D printers are capable of rapidly and cost-effectively producing custom-made structures for use within the laboratory. We here describe the advantages of producing hardware for a tissue culture system using an inexpensive in-lab printer.

Show MeSH