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Basal cell carcinoma.

Chung S - Arch Plast Surg (2012)

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, National Health Insurance Corporation Ilsan Hospital, Goyang, Korea.

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Apart from the mutagenesis, sunlight decreases immune surveillance for new tumor cells... A gene commonly found to be mutated in BCC is the PTCH gene... A PTCH gene mutation at chromosome 9q22.3, which inhibits the hedgehog signaling pathway, is found in patients with basal cell nevus syndrome (Gorlin syndrome)... The most commonly found clinical feature of BCC is an elevated tumor with a pearly and translucent margin and telangiectasia... - Nodular basal cell carcinoma (classic BCC) (Fig. 1): most common type (50% to 80%) and occurs most often on sun-exposed areas of the head and neck (85% to 90%). - Cystic basal cell carcinoma (Fig. 2): characterized by dome- shaped, blue-gray cystic nodules. - Morphoeic, morpheaform or cicatricial basal cell carcinoma (Fig. 3): 2% to 6% of BBCs; aggressive variant with distinct white sclerotic plaque and histological appearance. - Infiltrative basal cell carcinoma (Fig. 4): aggressive type characterized by deep infiltration. - Micronodular basal cell carcinoma: not clinically distinc tive, histologically micronodular growth pattern, curettage not indicated. - Superficial basal cell carcinoma (superficial multicentric basal cell carcinoma) (Fig. 5): at least 15% of BBCs; occurs most commonly on the trunk (40%) or distal extremities (14%) and grossly is an erythematous patch similar to ec zema or psoriasis; may grow to a large diameter and is the most common type of BCC in HIV patients. - Pigmented basal cell carcinoma (Fig. 6): about 6% of all BCCs; similar in appearance to nodular BBC but with increased melanization (brown or black); common type of BCC in Asians. - Rodent ulcer (Jacobi ulcer) (Fig. 7): untreated BCC that has formed ulceration. - Fibroepithelioma of Pinkus (Fig. 8): most commonly occurs on the lower back, groin, or thigh areas; may grow to large size. - Polypoid basal cell carcinoma (Fig. 9): characterized by exophytic nodules on the head and neck. - Pore-like basal cell carcinoma (Fig. 10): usually found in thick sebaceous skin (nose, nasolabial fold, or lower fore head) and resembles an enlarged pore or stellate pit; gener ally in men and the majority are smokers. - Aberrant basal cell carcinoma: absence of any apparent carci nogenic factor or occurring in odd sites such as the scrotum, vulva, perineum, nipple, or axilla. - Solitary basal cell carcinoma in the young: occur in the region of facial embryonic clefts and are commonly deeply invasive... - TX: primary tumor cannot be assessed. - T0: no evidence of primary tumor. - Tis: carcinoma in situ. - T1: carcinoma less than 2 cm in greatest dimension, with less than 2 high-risk features. - T2: carcinoma greater than 2 cm in greatest dimension, or a tumor of any size with at least 2 high-risk features. - T3: tumor invasion of the maxilla, mandible, orbit, or temporal bone. - T4: tumor invasion of the skeleton (appendicular or axial) or with perineural involvement of the skull base... - NX: regional lymph nodes cannot be assessed. - N0: no regional lymph node metastasis. - N1: metastasis in a single ipsilateral lymph node, 3 cm or less in greatest dimension. - N2: metastasis in a single ipsilateral lymph node, more than 3 cm but not more than 6 cm in greatest dimension; or in multiple ipsilateral lymph nodes, none more than 6 cm in greatest dimension; or in bilateral or contralateral lymph nodes, none more than 6 cm in greatest dimension. - N2a: metastasis in a single ipsilateral lymph node, more than 3 cm but not more than 6 cm in greatest dimension. - N2b: metastasis in multiple ipsilateral lymph nodes, none more than 6 cm in greatest dimension. - N2c: metastasis in bilateral or contralateral lymph nodes, none more than 6 cm in greatest dimension. - N3: metastasis in a lymph node, more than 6 cm in great est dimension... The following are common methods used in the treatment of BCC: wide excision, curettage and electrodessication, Mohs micrographic surgery, cryosurgery, and radiation, while topical skin creams with imiquimod or 5-fluorouracil may be used to treat superficial basal cell carcinoma... Recurrence is most common on the nose and nasolabial fold... Infiltrative, micronodular, and multifocal types have higher rates of recurrence than nodular types... Basal cell carcinoma rarely metastasizes (0.028% to 0.55%)... The most common sites of metastasis are the lymph nodes, lungs, and bones... Patients who are diagnosed with BCC have a 35% chance of recurrence at the same site within 3 years and a 50% chance of developing another (not recurrent) BCC within 5 years.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Nodular basal cell carcinoma (classic BCC).
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Figure 1: Nodular basal cell carcinoma (classic BCC).

Mentions: - Nodular basal cell carcinoma (classic BCC) (Fig. 1): most common type (50% to 80%) and occurs most often on sun-exposed areas of the head and neck (85% to 90%).


Basal cell carcinoma.

Chung S - Arch Plast Surg (2012)

Nodular basal cell carcinoma (classic BCC).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3385325&req=5

Figure 1: Nodular basal cell carcinoma (classic BCC).
Mentions: - Nodular basal cell carcinoma (classic BCC) (Fig. 1): most common type (50% to 80%) and occurs most often on sun-exposed areas of the head and neck (85% to 90%).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, National Health Insurance Corporation Ilsan Hospital, Goyang, Korea.

AUTOMATICALLY GENERATED EXCERPT
Please rate it.

Apart from the mutagenesis, sunlight decreases immune surveillance for new tumor cells... A gene commonly found to be mutated in BCC is the PTCH gene... A PTCH gene mutation at chromosome 9q22.3, which inhibits the hedgehog signaling pathway, is found in patients with basal cell nevus syndrome (Gorlin syndrome)... The most commonly found clinical feature of BCC is an elevated tumor with a pearly and translucent margin and telangiectasia... - Nodular basal cell carcinoma (classic BCC) (Fig. 1): most common type (50% to 80%) and occurs most often on sun-exposed areas of the head and neck (85% to 90%). - Cystic basal cell carcinoma (Fig. 2): characterized by dome- shaped, blue-gray cystic nodules. - Morphoeic, morpheaform or cicatricial basal cell carcinoma (Fig. 3): 2% to 6% of BBCs; aggressive variant with distinct white sclerotic plaque and histological appearance. - Infiltrative basal cell carcinoma (Fig. 4): aggressive type characterized by deep infiltration. - Micronodular basal cell carcinoma: not clinically distinc tive, histologically micronodular growth pattern, curettage not indicated. - Superficial basal cell carcinoma (superficial multicentric basal cell carcinoma) (Fig. 5): at least 15% of BBCs; occurs most commonly on the trunk (40%) or distal extremities (14%) and grossly is an erythematous patch similar to ec zema or psoriasis; may grow to a large diameter and is the most common type of BCC in HIV patients. - Pigmented basal cell carcinoma (Fig. 6): about 6% of all BCCs; similar in appearance to nodular BBC but with increased melanization (brown or black); common type of BCC in Asians. - Rodent ulcer (Jacobi ulcer) (Fig. 7): untreated BCC that has formed ulceration. - Fibroepithelioma of Pinkus (Fig. 8): most commonly occurs on the lower back, groin, or thigh areas; may grow to large size. - Polypoid basal cell carcinoma (Fig. 9): characterized by exophytic nodules on the head and neck. - Pore-like basal cell carcinoma (Fig. 10): usually found in thick sebaceous skin (nose, nasolabial fold, or lower fore head) and resembles an enlarged pore or stellate pit; gener ally in men and the majority are smokers. - Aberrant basal cell carcinoma: absence of any apparent carci nogenic factor or occurring in odd sites such as the scrotum, vulva, perineum, nipple, or axilla. - Solitary basal cell carcinoma in the young: occur in the region of facial embryonic clefts and are commonly deeply invasive... - TX: primary tumor cannot be assessed. - T0: no evidence of primary tumor. - Tis: carcinoma in situ. - T1: carcinoma less than 2 cm in greatest dimension, with less than 2 high-risk features. - T2: carcinoma greater than 2 cm in greatest dimension, or a tumor of any size with at least 2 high-risk features. - T3: tumor invasion of the maxilla, mandible, orbit, or temporal bone. - T4: tumor invasion of the skeleton (appendicular or axial) or with perineural involvement of the skull base... - NX: regional lymph nodes cannot be assessed. - N0: no regional lymph node metastasis. - N1: metastasis in a single ipsilateral lymph node, 3 cm or less in greatest dimension. - N2: metastasis in a single ipsilateral lymph node, more than 3 cm but not more than 6 cm in greatest dimension; or in multiple ipsilateral lymph nodes, none more than 6 cm in greatest dimension; or in bilateral or contralateral lymph nodes, none more than 6 cm in greatest dimension. - N2a: metastasis in a single ipsilateral lymph node, more than 3 cm but not more than 6 cm in greatest dimension. - N2b: metastasis in multiple ipsilateral lymph nodes, none more than 6 cm in greatest dimension. - N2c: metastasis in bilateral or contralateral lymph nodes, none more than 6 cm in greatest dimension. - N3: metastasis in a lymph node, more than 6 cm in great est dimension... The following are common methods used in the treatment of BCC: wide excision, curettage and electrodessication, Mohs micrographic surgery, cryosurgery, and radiation, while topical skin creams with imiquimod or 5-fluorouracil may be used to treat superficial basal cell carcinoma... Recurrence is most common on the nose and nasolabial fold... Infiltrative, micronodular, and multifocal types have higher rates of recurrence than nodular types... Basal cell carcinoma rarely metastasizes (0.028% to 0.55%)... The most common sites of metastasis are the lymph nodes, lungs, and bones... Patients who are diagnosed with BCC have a 35% chance of recurrence at the same site within 3 years and a 50% chance of developing another (not recurrent) BCC within 5 years.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus