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Use of cross-taxon congruence for hotspot identification at a regional scale.

Fattorini S, Dennis RL, Cook LM - PLoS ONE (2012)

Bottom Line: Cross-taxon congruence in species richness patterns is of paramount importance at regional scales to disclose areas of high conservation value that are significant in a broader biogeographical context but yet placed in the finer, more practical, political context of decision making.Nevertheless, our study demonstrates that a given group may partially stand in for another with similar ecological needs and biogeographical histories.We therefore advocate the use of multiple sets of taxa, chosen so as to be representative of animals with different ecological needs and biogeographical histories.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Water Ecology Team, Department of Biotechnology and Biosciences, University of Milano Bicocca, Milan, Italy. simone_fattorini@virgilio.it

ABSTRACT
One of the most debated problems in conservation biology is the use of indicator (surrogate) taxa to predict spatial patterns in other taxa. Cross-taxon congruence in species richness patterns is of paramount importance at regional scales to disclose areas of high conservation value that are significant in a broader biogeographical context but yet placed in the finer, more practical, political context of decision making. We analysed spatial patterns of diversity in six arthropod taxa from the Turkish fauna as a regional case study relevant to global conservation of the Mediterranean basin. Although we found high congruence in cross-taxon comparisons of species richness (0.241

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The Mediterranean global hotspot (a), location of the study area (Turkey) (b), its main biogeographical regions (c), and hotspots for different arthropod groups (d).Position of the Anatolian Diagonal, a major biogeographical barrier, is shown in panel c. For each group, hotspots were calculated as the first 10 per cent rank in three different diversity metrics (species richness, species richness-area ratio, residual from the species-area relationship). Different grey tones indicate if a certain hotspot has been identified by one, two or all three metrics.
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pone-0040018-g001: The Mediterranean global hotspot (a), location of the study area (Turkey) (b), its main biogeographical regions (c), and hotspots for different arthropod groups (d).Position of the Anatolian Diagonal, a major biogeographical barrier, is shown in panel c. For each group, hotspots were calculated as the first 10 per cent rank in three different diversity metrics (species richness, species richness-area ratio, residual from the species-area relationship). Different grey tones indicate if a certain hotspot has been identified by one, two or all three metrics.

Mentions: For this purpose we selected six arthropod taxa (centipedes, tiger beetles, water scavenger beetles, nitidulid beetles, leaf beetles, and butterflies) with different ecological needs (carnivores and herbivores) from the Turkish fauna (Fig. 1). The Mediterranean basin is one of the global hotspots under serious threat [8], [20], [21] and Turkey is one of the foremost centres of Mediterranean and European biodiversity [22]–[25]; thus preservation of Turkish wilderness is of both local and global importance.


Use of cross-taxon congruence for hotspot identification at a regional scale.

Fattorini S, Dennis RL, Cook LM - PLoS ONE (2012)

The Mediterranean global hotspot (a), location of the study area (Turkey) (b), its main biogeographical regions (c), and hotspots for different arthropod groups (d).Position of the Anatolian Diagonal, a major biogeographical barrier, is shown in panel c. For each group, hotspots were calculated as the first 10 per cent rank in three different diversity metrics (species richness, species richness-area ratio, residual from the species-area relationship). Different grey tones indicate if a certain hotspot has been identified by one, two or all three metrics.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3383703&req=5

pone-0040018-g001: The Mediterranean global hotspot (a), location of the study area (Turkey) (b), its main biogeographical regions (c), and hotspots for different arthropod groups (d).Position of the Anatolian Diagonal, a major biogeographical barrier, is shown in panel c. For each group, hotspots were calculated as the first 10 per cent rank in three different diversity metrics (species richness, species richness-area ratio, residual from the species-area relationship). Different grey tones indicate if a certain hotspot has been identified by one, two or all three metrics.
Mentions: For this purpose we selected six arthropod taxa (centipedes, tiger beetles, water scavenger beetles, nitidulid beetles, leaf beetles, and butterflies) with different ecological needs (carnivores and herbivores) from the Turkish fauna (Fig. 1). The Mediterranean basin is one of the global hotspots under serious threat [8], [20], [21] and Turkey is one of the foremost centres of Mediterranean and European biodiversity [22]–[25]; thus preservation of Turkish wilderness is of both local and global importance.

Bottom Line: Cross-taxon congruence in species richness patterns is of paramount importance at regional scales to disclose areas of high conservation value that are significant in a broader biogeographical context but yet placed in the finer, more practical, political context of decision making.Nevertheless, our study demonstrates that a given group may partially stand in for another with similar ecological needs and biogeographical histories.We therefore advocate the use of multiple sets of taxa, chosen so as to be representative of animals with different ecological needs and biogeographical histories.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Water Ecology Team, Department of Biotechnology and Biosciences, University of Milano Bicocca, Milan, Italy. simone_fattorini@virgilio.it

ABSTRACT
One of the most debated problems in conservation biology is the use of indicator (surrogate) taxa to predict spatial patterns in other taxa. Cross-taxon congruence in species richness patterns is of paramount importance at regional scales to disclose areas of high conservation value that are significant in a broader biogeographical context but yet placed in the finer, more practical, political context of decision making. We analysed spatial patterns of diversity in six arthropod taxa from the Turkish fauna as a regional case study relevant to global conservation of the Mediterranean basin. Although we found high congruence in cross-taxon comparisons of species richness (0.241

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus