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Effects of heavy metals and arbuscular mycorrhiza on the leaf proteome of a selected poplar clone: a time course analysis.

Lingua G, Bona E, Todeschini V, Cattaneo C, Marsano F, Berta G, Cavaletto M - PLoS ONE (2012)

Bottom Line: Therefore, in this work a clone of Populus alba L., previously selected for its tolerance to copper and zinc, was used to investigate the effects of the symbiosis with the AM fungus Glomus intraradices on the leaf protein expression.At the first harvest the most relevant effect on protein modulation was exerted by the AM fungi, at the second one by the metals, and at the last one by both treatments.In addition, it underlines the ability of a proteomic approach, targeted on protein identification, to depict changes in a specific pattern of protein expression, while being still far from elucidating the biological function of each protein.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Dipartimento di Scienze e Innovazione Tecnologica, University of Piemonte Orientale A Avogadro, Alessandria, Italy. guido.lingua@mfn.unipmn.it

ABSTRACT
Arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi establish a mutualistic symbiosis with the roots of most plant species. While receiving photosynthates, they improve the mineral nutrition of the plant and can also increase its tolerance towards some pollutants, like heavy metals. Although the fungal symbionts exclusively colonize the plant roots, some plant responses can be systemic. Therefore, in this work a clone of Populus alba L., previously selected for its tolerance to copper and zinc, was used to investigate the effects of the symbiosis with the AM fungus Glomus intraradices on the leaf protein expression. Poplar leaf samples were collected from plants maintained in a glasshouse on polluted (copper and zinc contaminated) or unpolluted soil, after four, six and sixteen months of growth. For each harvest, about 450 proteins were reproducibly separated on 2DE maps. At the first harvest the most relevant effect on protein modulation was exerted by the AM fungi, at the second one by the metals, and at the last one by both treatments. This work demonstrates how importantly the time of sampling affects the proteome responses in perennial plants. In addition, it underlines the ability of a proteomic approach, targeted on protein identification, to depict changes in a specific pattern of protein expression, while being still far from elucidating the biological function of each protein.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Two-dimensional maps of poplar leaf proteins.Representative 2-DE maps of poplar leaf proteins (500 µg) stained with Blue silver, colloidal Coomassie, (a) sampling S1, (b) sampling S2, and (c) sampling S3. IEF was performed with 13 cm IPG strips pH 4–7, followed by SDS-PAGE on 12% gel. Differently expressed spots are highlighted.
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pone-0038662-g001: Two-dimensional maps of poplar leaf proteins.Representative 2-DE maps of poplar leaf proteins (500 µg) stained with Blue silver, colloidal Coomassie, (a) sampling S1, (b) sampling S2, and (c) sampling S3. IEF was performed with 13 cm IPG strips pH 4–7, followed by SDS-PAGE on 12% gel. Differently expressed spots are highlighted.

Mentions: The 2D maps of leaf proteins, stained with Colloidal Coomassie, showed a mean of 450 spots reproducibly separated for each of the three samplings (Figures 1A–C and Figure S1 of supplementary materials). Statistically significant variations were detected for 22 spots (of which 19 were identified) at sampling S1, 52 spots (47 identified) at sampling S2, 66 spots (59 identified) at sampling S3.


Effects of heavy metals and arbuscular mycorrhiza on the leaf proteome of a selected poplar clone: a time course analysis.

Lingua G, Bona E, Todeschini V, Cattaneo C, Marsano F, Berta G, Cavaletto M - PLoS ONE (2012)

Two-dimensional maps of poplar leaf proteins.Representative 2-DE maps of poplar leaf proteins (500 µg) stained with Blue silver, colloidal Coomassie, (a) sampling S1, (b) sampling S2, and (c) sampling S3. IEF was performed with 13 cm IPG strips pH 4–7, followed by SDS-PAGE on 12% gel. Differently expressed spots are highlighted.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3383689&req=5

pone-0038662-g001: Two-dimensional maps of poplar leaf proteins.Representative 2-DE maps of poplar leaf proteins (500 µg) stained with Blue silver, colloidal Coomassie, (a) sampling S1, (b) sampling S2, and (c) sampling S3. IEF was performed with 13 cm IPG strips pH 4–7, followed by SDS-PAGE on 12% gel. Differently expressed spots are highlighted.
Mentions: The 2D maps of leaf proteins, stained with Colloidal Coomassie, showed a mean of 450 spots reproducibly separated for each of the three samplings (Figures 1A–C and Figure S1 of supplementary materials). Statistically significant variations were detected for 22 spots (of which 19 were identified) at sampling S1, 52 spots (47 identified) at sampling S2, 66 spots (59 identified) at sampling S3.

Bottom Line: Therefore, in this work a clone of Populus alba L., previously selected for its tolerance to copper and zinc, was used to investigate the effects of the symbiosis with the AM fungus Glomus intraradices on the leaf protein expression.At the first harvest the most relevant effect on protein modulation was exerted by the AM fungi, at the second one by the metals, and at the last one by both treatments.In addition, it underlines the ability of a proteomic approach, targeted on protein identification, to depict changes in a specific pattern of protein expression, while being still far from elucidating the biological function of each protein.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Dipartimento di Scienze e Innovazione Tecnologica, University of Piemonte Orientale A Avogadro, Alessandria, Italy. guido.lingua@mfn.unipmn.it

ABSTRACT
Arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi establish a mutualistic symbiosis with the roots of most plant species. While receiving photosynthates, they improve the mineral nutrition of the plant and can also increase its tolerance towards some pollutants, like heavy metals. Although the fungal symbionts exclusively colonize the plant roots, some plant responses can be systemic. Therefore, in this work a clone of Populus alba L., previously selected for its tolerance to copper and zinc, was used to investigate the effects of the symbiosis with the AM fungus Glomus intraradices on the leaf protein expression. Poplar leaf samples were collected from plants maintained in a glasshouse on polluted (copper and zinc contaminated) or unpolluted soil, after four, six and sixteen months of growth. For each harvest, about 450 proteins were reproducibly separated on 2DE maps. At the first harvest the most relevant effect on protein modulation was exerted by the AM fungi, at the second one by the metals, and at the last one by both treatments. This work demonstrates how importantly the time of sampling affects the proteome responses in perennial plants. In addition, it underlines the ability of a proteomic approach, targeted on protein identification, to depict changes in a specific pattern of protein expression, while being still far from elucidating the biological function of each protein.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus