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Phosphatidylserine colocalizes with epichromatin in interphase nuclei and mitotic chromosomes.

Prudovsky I, Vary CP, Markaki Y, Olins AL, Olins DE - Nucleus (2012)

Bottom Line: Studies with a specific anti-nucleosome antibody recently demonstrated that the surface ("epichromatin") of interphase and mitotic chromatin possesses a unique and conserved conformation, suggesting a role in postmitotic nuclear reformation.Here we present evidence showing that the anionic glycerophospholipid phosphatidylserine is specifically located in epichromatin throughout the cell cycle and is associated with nucleosome core histones.This suggests that chromatin bound phosphatidylserine may function as a nucleation site for the binding of ER and re-establishment of the nuclear envelope.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Maine Medical Center Research Institute, Scarborough, ME, USA.

ABSTRACT
Cycling eukaryotic cells rapidly re-establish the nuclear envelope and internal architecture following mitosis. Studies with a specific anti-nucleosome antibody recently demonstrated that the surface ("epichromatin") of interphase and mitotic chromatin possesses a unique and conserved conformation, suggesting a role in postmitotic nuclear reformation. Here we present evidence showing that the anionic glycerophospholipid phosphatidylserine is specifically located in epichromatin throughout the cell cycle and is associated with nucleosome core histones. This suggests that chromatin bound phosphatidylserine may function as a nucleation site for the binding of ER and re-establishment of the nuclear envelope.

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Figure 5. Anti-phosphatidylserine (1H6) and anti-epichromatin (PL2-6) staining of Drosophila Kc cells. Deconvolution images are presented. Top row, co-immunostaining with 1H6 (red), anti-H3S10p (green) and DAPI (blue); bottom row, co-immunostaining with PL2-6 (red), anti-H3S10p (green) and DAPI (blue). Right column, merged images. Scale bar: 10 µm.
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Figure 5: Figure 5. Anti-phosphatidylserine (1H6) and anti-epichromatin (PL2-6) staining of Drosophila Kc cells. Deconvolution images are presented. Top row, co-immunostaining with 1H6 (red), anti-H3S10p (green) and DAPI (blue); bottom row, co-immunostaining with PL2-6 (red), anti-H3S10p (green) and DAPI (blue). Right column, merged images. Scale bar: 10 µm.

Mentions: Drosophila melanogaster, like most eukaryotes, possesses PS in its cellular membranes.3 The evolutionary conservation of PL2-6 staining has been demonstrated in diverse animal and plant species.2 To examine whether the 1H6 epitope is also conserved, we immunostained Drosophila Kc cells with 1H6 or PL2-6 combined with the mitotic marker, anti-H3S10p, using deconvolution microscopy to view interphase and mitotic cells. Figure 5 demonstrates that PL2-6 and 1H6 yield identical and highly conserved staining patterns, similar to immunostained mammalian cells.


Phosphatidylserine colocalizes with epichromatin in interphase nuclei and mitotic chromosomes.

Prudovsky I, Vary CP, Markaki Y, Olins AL, Olins DE - Nucleus (2012)

Figure 5. Anti-phosphatidylserine (1H6) and anti-epichromatin (PL2-6) staining of Drosophila Kc cells. Deconvolution images are presented. Top row, co-immunostaining with 1H6 (red), anti-H3S10p (green) and DAPI (blue); bottom row, co-immunostaining with PL2-6 (red), anti-H3S10p (green) and DAPI (blue). Right column, merged images. Scale bar: 10 µm.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3383575&req=5

Figure 5: Figure 5. Anti-phosphatidylserine (1H6) and anti-epichromatin (PL2-6) staining of Drosophila Kc cells. Deconvolution images are presented. Top row, co-immunostaining with 1H6 (red), anti-H3S10p (green) and DAPI (blue); bottom row, co-immunostaining with PL2-6 (red), anti-H3S10p (green) and DAPI (blue). Right column, merged images. Scale bar: 10 µm.
Mentions: Drosophila melanogaster, like most eukaryotes, possesses PS in its cellular membranes.3 The evolutionary conservation of PL2-6 staining has been demonstrated in diverse animal and plant species.2 To examine whether the 1H6 epitope is also conserved, we immunostained Drosophila Kc cells with 1H6 or PL2-6 combined with the mitotic marker, anti-H3S10p, using deconvolution microscopy to view interphase and mitotic cells. Figure 5 demonstrates that PL2-6 and 1H6 yield identical and highly conserved staining patterns, similar to immunostained mammalian cells.

Bottom Line: Studies with a specific anti-nucleosome antibody recently demonstrated that the surface ("epichromatin") of interphase and mitotic chromatin possesses a unique and conserved conformation, suggesting a role in postmitotic nuclear reformation.Here we present evidence showing that the anionic glycerophospholipid phosphatidylserine is specifically located in epichromatin throughout the cell cycle and is associated with nucleosome core histones.This suggests that chromatin bound phosphatidylserine may function as a nucleation site for the binding of ER and re-establishment of the nuclear envelope.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Maine Medical Center Research Institute, Scarborough, ME, USA.

ABSTRACT
Cycling eukaryotic cells rapidly re-establish the nuclear envelope and internal architecture following mitosis. Studies with a specific anti-nucleosome antibody recently demonstrated that the surface ("epichromatin") of interphase and mitotic chromatin possesses a unique and conserved conformation, suggesting a role in postmitotic nuclear reformation. Here we present evidence showing that the anionic glycerophospholipid phosphatidylserine is specifically located in epichromatin throughout the cell cycle and is associated with nucleosome core histones. This suggests that chromatin bound phosphatidylserine may function as a nucleation site for the binding of ER and re-establishment of the nuclear envelope.

Show MeSH