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Characterizing the spiking dynamics of subthalamic nucleus neurons in Parkinson's disease using generalized linear models.

Eden UT, Gale JT, Amirnovin R, Eskandar EN - Front Integr Neurosci (2012)

Bottom Line: The model relates each neuron's spiking probability simultaneously to factors associated with movement planning and execution, directional selectivity, refractoriness, bursting, and oscillatory dynamics.The model indicated that while short-term history dependence related to refractoriness and bursting are most informative in predicting spiking activity, nearly all of the neurons analyzed have a structured pattern of long-term history dependence such that the spiking probability was reduced 20-30 ms and then increased 30-60 ms after a previous spike.This point process model provides a systematic framework for characterizing the dynamics of neuronal activity in STN.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Mathematics and Statistics, Boston University, Boston MA, USA.

ABSTRACT
Accurately describing the spiking patterns of neurons in the subthalamic nucleus (STN) of patients suffering from Parkinson's disease (PD) is important for understanding the pathogenesis of the disease and for achieving the maximum therapeutic benefit from deep brain stimulation (DBS). We analyze the spiking activity of 24 subthalamic neurons recorded in Parkinson's patients during a directed hand movement task by using a point process generalized linear model (GLM). The model relates each neuron's spiking probability simultaneously to factors associated with movement planning and execution, directional selectivity, refractoriness, bursting, and oscillatory dynamics. The model indicated that while short-term history dependence related to refractoriness and bursting are most informative in predicting spiking activity, nearly all of the neurons analyzed have a structured pattern of long-term history dependence such that the spiking probability was reduced 20-30 ms and then increased 30-60 ms after a previous spike. This suggests that the previously described oscillatory firing of neurons in the STN of Parkinson's patients during volitional movements is composed of a structured pattern of inhibition and excitation. This point process model provides a systematic framework for characterizing the dynamics of neuronal activity in STN.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Schematic representation of behavioral task.
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Figure 2: Schematic representation of behavioral task.

Mentions: Before the recordings were made, an electrophysiologist performed sensory-motor testing, as previously described (Baker et al., 2002), to ensure that the electrodes were positioned in the motor region of the STN. Once the microelectrodes were in the motor-STN, the subjects viewed a computer monitor and performed the behavioral task by moving a joystick with the contralateral hand. The joystick was mounted such that movements were in a horizontal orientation with the elbow flexed at approximately 45°. Figure 2 illustrates the behavioral task. Each trial began with the presentation of a small central fixation point. After a brief delay (250 ms), four small gray targets appeared arrayed in a circular fashion around the fixation point. After a 1500 ms delay a randomly selected target turned green. At this point the subject used the joystick to guide a cursor from the center of the monitor toward the green target. Once the target was reached, a tone sounded indicating the subject had successfully completed the task, and the stimuli were erased. Patients were required to reach the target within 5 s of the green cue presentation, although they typically reached the target within 1 s of the onset of the stimulus. There was an inter-trial interval of 1500 ms. Subjects were required to return the joystick to the center position before a new trial started. If the subject prematurely moved the joystick, strayed beyond the confines of an invisible corridor, or failed to reach the target the trial was aborted and excluded from analysis. Very few of these error trials occurred. The target directions were pseudo-randomized to ensure an equal number of trials in each direction. Patients typically performed 12–24 correct trials in each direction at a given site. Each recording run lasted about 3–5 min.


Characterizing the spiking dynamics of subthalamic nucleus neurons in Parkinson's disease using generalized linear models.

Eden UT, Gale JT, Amirnovin R, Eskandar EN - Front Integr Neurosci (2012)

Schematic representation of behavioral task.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3379030&req=5

Figure 2: Schematic representation of behavioral task.
Mentions: Before the recordings were made, an electrophysiologist performed sensory-motor testing, as previously described (Baker et al., 2002), to ensure that the electrodes were positioned in the motor region of the STN. Once the microelectrodes were in the motor-STN, the subjects viewed a computer monitor and performed the behavioral task by moving a joystick with the contralateral hand. The joystick was mounted such that movements were in a horizontal orientation with the elbow flexed at approximately 45°. Figure 2 illustrates the behavioral task. Each trial began with the presentation of a small central fixation point. After a brief delay (250 ms), four small gray targets appeared arrayed in a circular fashion around the fixation point. After a 1500 ms delay a randomly selected target turned green. At this point the subject used the joystick to guide a cursor from the center of the monitor toward the green target. Once the target was reached, a tone sounded indicating the subject had successfully completed the task, and the stimuli were erased. Patients were required to reach the target within 5 s of the green cue presentation, although they typically reached the target within 1 s of the onset of the stimulus. There was an inter-trial interval of 1500 ms. Subjects were required to return the joystick to the center position before a new trial started. If the subject prematurely moved the joystick, strayed beyond the confines of an invisible corridor, or failed to reach the target the trial was aborted and excluded from analysis. Very few of these error trials occurred. The target directions were pseudo-randomized to ensure an equal number of trials in each direction. Patients typically performed 12–24 correct trials in each direction at a given site. Each recording run lasted about 3–5 min.

Bottom Line: The model relates each neuron's spiking probability simultaneously to factors associated with movement planning and execution, directional selectivity, refractoriness, bursting, and oscillatory dynamics.The model indicated that while short-term history dependence related to refractoriness and bursting are most informative in predicting spiking activity, nearly all of the neurons analyzed have a structured pattern of long-term history dependence such that the spiking probability was reduced 20-30 ms and then increased 30-60 ms after a previous spike.This point process model provides a systematic framework for characterizing the dynamics of neuronal activity in STN.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Mathematics and Statistics, Boston University, Boston MA, USA.

ABSTRACT
Accurately describing the spiking patterns of neurons in the subthalamic nucleus (STN) of patients suffering from Parkinson's disease (PD) is important for understanding the pathogenesis of the disease and for achieving the maximum therapeutic benefit from deep brain stimulation (DBS). We analyze the spiking activity of 24 subthalamic neurons recorded in Parkinson's patients during a directed hand movement task by using a point process generalized linear model (GLM). The model relates each neuron's spiking probability simultaneously to factors associated with movement planning and execution, directional selectivity, refractoriness, bursting, and oscillatory dynamics. The model indicated that while short-term history dependence related to refractoriness and bursting are most informative in predicting spiking activity, nearly all of the neurons analyzed have a structured pattern of long-term history dependence such that the spiking probability was reduced 20-30 ms and then increased 30-60 ms after a previous spike. This suggests that the previously described oscillatory firing of neurons in the STN of Parkinson's patients during volitional movements is composed of a structured pattern of inhibition and excitation. This point process model provides a systematic framework for characterizing the dynamics of neuronal activity in STN.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus