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Is access to specialist assessment of chest pain equitable by age, gender, ethnicity and socioeconomic status? An enhanced ecological analysis.

Sekhri N, Timmis A, Hemingway H, Walsh N, Eldridge S, Junghans C, Feder G - BMJ Open (2012)

Bottom Line: Women had lower attendance rate ratios (0.81, 95% CI 0.77 to 0.84) and also lower population CHD mortality rate ratios compared with men.South Asians had higher attendance rates (1.67, 95% CI 1.57 to 1.77) compared with whites and had a higher standardised CHD mortality ratio of 1.46 (95% CI 1.41 to 1.51).More robust and patient focused administrative pathways need to be developed to detect inequity, correction of which has the potential to substantially reduce coronary mortality.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Cardiac Directorate, Barts and the London NHS Trust, London, UK.

ABSTRACT

Objectives: To determine whether access to rapid access chest pain clinics of people with recent onset symptoms is equitable by age, socioeconomic status, ethnicity and gender, according to need.

Design: Retrospective cohort study with ecological analysis.

Setting: Patients referred from primary care to five rapid access chest pain clinics in secondary care, across England.

Participants: Of 8647 patients aged ≥35 years referred to chest pain clinics with new-onset stable chest pain but no known cardiac history, 7570 with documented census ward codes, age, gender and ethnicity comprised the study group. Patients excluded were those with missing date of birth, gender or ethnicity (n=782) and those with missing census ward codes (n=295).

Outcome measures: Effects of age, gender, ethnicity and socioeconomic status on clinic attendance were calculated as attendance rate ratios, with number of attendances as the outcome and resident population-years as the exposure in each stratum, using Poisson regression. Attendance rate ratios were then compared with coronary heart disease (CHD) mortality ratios to determine whether attendance was equitable according to need.

Results: Adjusted attendance rate ratios for patients aged >65 years were similar to younger patients (1.1, 95% CI 1.05 to 1.16), despite population CHD mortality rate ratios nearly 15 times higher in the older age group. Women had lower attendance rate ratios (0.81, 95% CI 0.77 to 0.84) and also lower population CHD mortality rate ratios compared with men. South Asians had higher attendance rates (1.67, 95% CI 1.57 to 1.77) compared with whites and had a higher standardised CHD mortality ratio of 1.46 (95% CI 1.41 to 1.51). Although univariable analysis showed that the most deprived patients (quintile 5) had an attendance rate twice that of less deprived quintiles, the adjusted analysis showed their attendance to be 13% lower (0.87, 95% CI 0.81 to 0.94) despite a higher population CHD mortality rate.

Conclusion: There is evidence of underutilisation of chest pain clinics by older people and those from lower socioeconomic status. More robust and patient focused administrative pathways need to be developed to detect inequity, correction of which has the potential to substantially reduce coronary mortality.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

RACPC study population to determine utilisation by age, gender, ethnicity and deprivation. ACS, acute coronary syndrome; CABG, coronary artery bypass surgery; PTCA, percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty.
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fig1: RACPC study population to determine utilisation by age, gender, ethnicity and deprivation. ACS, acute coronary syndrome; CABG, coronary artery bypass surgery; PTCA, percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty.

Mentions: We collected data on consecutive patients referred to five rapid access chest pain clinics from 1 January 1996 to 31 December 2002 with new onset of chest pain. We excluded patients younger than 35 years, patients without chest pain, patients with previously diagnosed coronary artery disease, patients diagnosed with acute coronary syndrome, patients with incomplete data on age, gender and ethnicity, and patients not traced by central registries—the Office for National Statistics (ONS)11 or the Secondary Uses Service12 (figure 1).


Is access to specialist assessment of chest pain equitable by age, gender, ethnicity and socioeconomic status? An enhanced ecological analysis.

Sekhri N, Timmis A, Hemingway H, Walsh N, Eldridge S, Junghans C, Feder G - BMJ Open (2012)

RACPC study population to determine utilisation by age, gender, ethnicity and deprivation. ACS, acute coronary syndrome; CABG, coronary artery bypass surgery; PTCA, percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3378943&req=5

fig1: RACPC study population to determine utilisation by age, gender, ethnicity and deprivation. ACS, acute coronary syndrome; CABG, coronary artery bypass surgery; PTCA, percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty.
Mentions: We collected data on consecutive patients referred to five rapid access chest pain clinics from 1 January 1996 to 31 December 2002 with new onset of chest pain. We excluded patients younger than 35 years, patients without chest pain, patients with previously diagnosed coronary artery disease, patients diagnosed with acute coronary syndrome, patients with incomplete data on age, gender and ethnicity, and patients not traced by central registries—the Office for National Statistics (ONS)11 or the Secondary Uses Service12 (figure 1).

Bottom Line: Women had lower attendance rate ratios (0.81, 95% CI 0.77 to 0.84) and also lower population CHD mortality rate ratios compared with men.South Asians had higher attendance rates (1.67, 95% CI 1.57 to 1.77) compared with whites and had a higher standardised CHD mortality ratio of 1.46 (95% CI 1.41 to 1.51).More robust and patient focused administrative pathways need to be developed to detect inequity, correction of which has the potential to substantially reduce coronary mortality.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Cardiac Directorate, Barts and the London NHS Trust, London, UK.

ABSTRACT

Objectives: To determine whether access to rapid access chest pain clinics of people with recent onset symptoms is equitable by age, socioeconomic status, ethnicity and gender, according to need.

Design: Retrospective cohort study with ecological analysis.

Setting: Patients referred from primary care to five rapid access chest pain clinics in secondary care, across England.

Participants: Of 8647 patients aged ≥35 years referred to chest pain clinics with new-onset stable chest pain but no known cardiac history, 7570 with documented census ward codes, age, gender and ethnicity comprised the study group. Patients excluded were those with missing date of birth, gender or ethnicity (n=782) and those with missing census ward codes (n=295).

Outcome measures: Effects of age, gender, ethnicity and socioeconomic status on clinic attendance were calculated as attendance rate ratios, with number of attendances as the outcome and resident population-years as the exposure in each stratum, using Poisson regression. Attendance rate ratios were then compared with coronary heart disease (CHD) mortality ratios to determine whether attendance was equitable according to need.

Results: Adjusted attendance rate ratios for patients aged >65 years were similar to younger patients (1.1, 95% CI 1.05 to 1.16), despite population CHD mortality rate ratios nearly 15 times higher in the older age group. Women had lower attendance rate ratios (0.81, 95% CI 0.77 to 0.84) and also lower population CHD mortality rate ratios compared with men. South Asians had higher attendance rates (1.67, 95% CI 1.57 to 1.77) compared with whites and had a higher standardised CHD mortality ratio of 1.46 (95% CI 1.41 to 1.51). Although univariable analysis showed that the most deprived patients (quintile 5) had an attendance rate twice that of less deprived quintiles, the adjusted analysis showed their attendance to be 13% lower (0.87, 95% CI 0.81 to 0.94) despite a higher population CHD mortality rate.

Conclusion: There is evidence of underutilisation of chest pain clinics by older people and those from lower socioeconomic status. More robust and patient focused administrative pathways need to be developed to detect inequity, correction of which has the potential to substantially reduce coronary mortality.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus