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Helmet use in BIXI cyclists in Toronto, Canada: an observational study.

Bonyun M, Camden A, Macarthur C, Howard A - BMJ Open (2012)

Bottom Line: The outcome of interest was helmet use.The proportion of BIXI bike riders using helmets was significantly lower than the proportion of helmet users on personal bikes (20.9% vs 51.7%, respectively, p<0.0001).Since the prevalence of helmet use in cyclists in general is already low, helmet use should be especially promoted in BIXI bike riders in order to promote a safe and healthy environment for cyclists.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada.

ABSTRACT

Objective: To investigate the use of helmets for cyclists choosing to use BIXI bikes in comparison to personal bike riders in the City of Toronto.

Design: Cross-sectional study design.

Setting: Cyclists were observed in Toronto, Canada.

Participants: Of the 6732 sample size, 306 cyclists on BIXI bikes and 6426 personal bike riders were observed.

Outcome measure: The outcome of interest was helmet use.

Results: Overall, 50.3% of cyclists wore helmets. The proportion of BIXI bike riders using helmets was significantly lower than the proportion of helmet users on personal bikes (20.9% vs 51.7%, respectively, p<0.0001).

Conclusions: Although the BIXI bike programme has provided an alternate means for Torontonians to use a bicycle, cyclists using BIXI bikes are much less likely to wear a helmet. Since the prevalence of helmet use in cyclists in general is already low, helmet use should be especially promoted in BIXI bike riders in order to promote a safe and healthy environment for cyclists.

No MeSH data available.


BIXI bike docking station locations, Toronto, 2011.
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fig1: BIXI bike docking station locations, Toronto, 2011.

Mentions: The most prominent bike-sharing programme in North America is BIXI (named according to a combination of the elements of the programme: ‘BIcycle’ and ‘taXI’). BIXI was also the first bike-sharing company in Canada, initially in Montreal in 2009 and to the Toronto downtown core on 3 May 2011.2 Eighty solar-panelled stations were placed throughout the city (Figure 1). Each station consists of a pay station and bike docks, distributed according to population density, frequent travel paths and frequent bicyclist locations2 (Figure 2).


Helmet use in BIXI cyclists in Toronto, Canada: an observational study.

Bonyun M, Camden A, Macarthur C, Howard A - BMJ Open (2012)

BIXI bike docking station locations, Toronto, 2011.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3378939&req=5

fig1: BIXI bike docking station locations, Toronto, 2011.
Mentions: The most prominent bike-sharing programme in North America is BIXI (named according to a combination of the elements of the programme: ‘BIcycle’ and ‘taXI’). BIXI was also the first bike-sharing company in Canada, initially in Montreal in 2009 and to the Toronto downtown core on 3 May 2011.2 Eighty solar-panelled stations were placed throughout the city (Figure 1). Each station consists of a pay station and bike docks, distributed according to population density, frequent travel paths and frequent bicyclist locations2 (Figure 2).

Bottom Line: The outcome of interest was helmet use.The proportion of BIXI bike riders using helmets was significantly lower than the proportion of helmet users on personal bikes (20.9% vs 51.7%, respectively, p<0.0001).Since the prevalence of helmet use in cyclists in general is already low, helmet use should be especially promoted in BIXI bike riders in order to promote a safe and healthy environment for cyclists.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada.

ABSTRACT

Objective: To investigate the use of helmets for cyclists choosing to use BIXI bikes in comparison to personal bike riders in the City of Toronto.

Design: Cross-sectional study design.

Setting: Cyclists were observed in Toronto, Canada.

Participants: Of the 6732 sample size, 306 cyclists on BIXI bikes and 6426 personal bike riders were observed.

Outcome measure: The outcome of interest was helmet use.

Results: Overall, 50.3% of cyclists wore helmets. The proportion of BIXI bike riders using helmets was significantly lower than the proportion of helmet users on personal bikes (20.9% vs 51.7%, respectively, p<0.0001).

Conclusions: Although the BIXI bike programme has provided an alternate means for Torontonians to use a bicycle, cyclists using BIXI bikes are much less likely to wear a helmet. Since the prevalence of helmet use in cyclists in general is already low, helmet use should be especially promoted in BIXI bike riders in order to promote a safe and healthy environment for cyclists.

No MeSH data available.