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Aerobic neuromuscular electrical stimulation--an emerging technology to improve haemoglobin A1c in type 2 diabetes mellitus: results of a pilot study.

Crowe L, Caulfield B - BMJ Open (2012)

Bottom Line: The primary outcome measures were changes in haemoglobin A1c and the responses in a questionnaire on participants' perceptions of the system.Haemoglobin A1c levels improved by 0.8±0.7% from 7.4±1.3% (mean ± SD) to 6.6±1.0% (p=0.01).These results suggest that aerobic NMES may be acceptable and have a beneficial effect on haemoglobin A1c of some men with diabetes.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institute of Sport and Health, Newstead Building, University College Dublin, Dublin, Ireland.

ABSTRACT

Objectives: A new generation of neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) devices can exercise aerobically at equivalent rates to voluntary exercise. Many with type 2 diabetes cannot or will not exercise sufficiently. The objective of this pilot investigation was to see (1) if it was an acceptable training modality for men with type 2 diabetes mellitus and (2) to assess effects on haemoglobin A1c levels.

Design, setting, participants and intervention: A case series of eight men with type 2 diabetes mellitus (aged 53±8; body mass index 32±5 5 kg/m(2)) trained with the NMES system for 1 h 6 times weekly for 8 weeks, unsupervised, at home. There were no other medication or lifestyle interventions. The aerobic NMES exercise system delivers a repeating set of four complex staggered pulses at high intensities (typically 100 mA+) through an array of eight thigh electrodes.

Outcome measures: The primary outcome measures were changes in haemoglobin A1c and the responses in a questionnaire on participants' perceptions of the system. Body mass and composition were also measured before and after the NMES intervention period.

Results: All participants could use the system at a level that left them breathless and sweaty and with a heart rate over 120 beats per minute. Haemoglobin A1c levels improved by 0.8±0.7% from 7.4±1.3% (mean ± SD) to 6.6±1.0% (p=0.01). All participants considered the system suitable for people with diabetes, would recommend it and would continue to use it twice a week 'to maintain improvements'.

Conclusions: These results suggest that aerobic NMES may be acceptable and have a beneficial effect on haemoglobin A1c of some men with diabetes. The treatment may be of particular benefit in those who will not or cannot do adequate amounts of voluntary exercise. A randomised control trial is required for conclusive efficacy data.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Four large hydrogel electrodes are applied to the skin of each thigh using a neoprene wrap. The electrodes were pre-wired and mounted inside the wrap. The model's left leg is without the garment to illustrated electrode positioning.
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fig1: Four large hydrogel electrodes are applied to the skin of each thigh using a neoprene wrap. The electrodes were pre-wired and mounted inside the wrap. The model's left leg is without the garment to illustrated electrode positioning.

Mentions: The pulses were delivered through an array of eight large hydrogel electrodes, 17×10.3 cm, applied to the skin using two neoprene wrap garments, one applied to each thigh, see figure 1. The electrodes were pre-wired and mounted for convenient rapid and correct application. In figure 1, the model's left leg is without the garment to illustrate electrode positioning. The basic NMES pulse pattern is a composite of four pulses shared between the electrode array (figure 2). Repeating the pulse pattern at 5 Hz induces a strong non-fused non-tetanic contraction of the large muscle groups in the legs (quadriceps, hamstrings, gluteal and calf muscles).


Aerobic neuromuscular electrical stimulation--an emerging technology to improve haemoglobin A1c in type 2 diabetes mellitus: results of a pilot study.

Crowe L, Caulfield B - BMJ Open (2012)

Four large hydrogel electrodes are applied to the skin of each thigh using a neoprene wrap. The electrodes were pre-wired and mounted inside the wrap. The model's left leg is without the garment to illustrated electrode positioning.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3378935&req=5

fig1: Four large hydrogel electrodes are applied to the skin of each thigh using a neoprene wrap. The electrodes were pre-wired and mounted inside the wrap. The model's left leg is without the garment to illustrated electrode positioning.
Mentions: The pulses were delivered through an array of eight large hydrogel electrodes, 17×10.3 cm, applied to the skin using two neoprene wrap garments, one applied to each thigh, see figure 1. The electrodes were pre-wired and mounted for convenient rapid and correct application. In figure 1, the model's left leg is without the garment to illustrate electrode positioning. The basic NMES pulse pattern is a composite of four pulses shared between the electrode array (figure 2). Repeating the pulse pattern at 5 Hz induces a strong non-fused non-tetanic contraction of the large muscle groups in the legs (quadriceps, hamstrings, gluteal and calf muscles).

Bottom Line: The primary outcome measures were changes in haemoglobin A1c and the responses in a questionnaire on participants' perceptions of the system.Haemoglobin A1c levels improved by 0.8±0.7% from 7.4±1.3% (mean ± SD) to 6.6±1.0% (p=0.01).These results suggest that aerobic NMES may be acceptable and have a beneficial effect on haemoglobin A1c of some men with diabetes.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institute of Sport and Health, Newstead Building, University College Dublin, Dublin, Ireland.

ABSTRACT

Objectives: A new generation of neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) devices can exercise aerobically at equivalent rates to voluntary exercise. Many with type 2 diabetes cannot or will not exercise sufficiently. The objective of this pilot investigation was to see (1) if it was an acceptable training modality for men with type 2 diabetes mellitus and (2) to assess effects on haemoglobin A1c levels.

Design, setting, participants and intervention: A case series of eight men with type 2 diabetes mellitus (aged 53±8; body mass index 32±5 5 kg/m(2)) trained with the NMES system for 1 h 6 times weekly for 8 weeks, unsupervised, at home. There were no other medication or lifestyle interventions. The aerobic NMES exercise system delivers a repeating set of four complex staggered pulses at high intensities (typically 100 mA+) through an array of eight thigh electrodes.

Outcome measures: The primary outcome measures were changes in haemoglobin A1c and the responses in a questionnaire on participants' perceptions of the system. Body mass and composition were also measured before and after the NMES intervention period.

Results: All participants could use the system at a level that left them breathless and sweaty and with a heart rate over 120 beats per minute. Haemoglobin A1c levels improved by 0.8±0.7% from 7.4±1.3% (mean ± SD) to 6.6±1.0% (p=0.01). All participants considered the system suitable for people with diabetes, would recommend it and would continue to use it twice a week 'to maintain improvements'.

Conclusions: These results suggest that aerobic NMES may be acceptable and have a beneficial effect on haemoglobin A1c of some men with diabetes. The treatment may be of particular benefit in those who will not or cannot do adequate amounts of voluntary exercise. A randomised control trial is required for conclusive efficacy data.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus