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Primary synovial sarcoma of the abdominal wall: a case report and review of the literature.

Saif AH - J Family Community Med (2008)

Bottom Line: Synovial sarcoma is a malignant mesenchymal neoplasm which commonly occurs in the extremities of adults, in close association with joint capsules, tendon sheaths, bursae and fascial structures.Only a few cases of synovial sarcoma occurring in the abdominal wall have been reported.A case of a primary synovial sarcoma arising from the anterior abdominal wall fascial aponeurosis is presented.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Radiology, King Fahd Hospital of the University, College of Medicine, King Faisal University, Dammam, Saudi Arabia.

ABSTRACT
Synovial sarcoma is a malignant mesenchymal neoplasm which commonly occurs in the extremities of adults, in close association with joint capsules, tendon sheaths, bursae and fascial structures. Only a few cases of synovial sarcoma occurring in the abdominal wall have been reported. A case of a primary synovial sarcoma arising from the anterior abdominal wall fascial aponeurosis is presented.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

(a) Axial non-enhanced CT scan of the abdomen showing a well defined hypodense mass at the left hypchondrium, interposed between left liver lobe, left hemidiaphragm and stomach. (b) Contrast enhanced CT scan showing heterogeneous contrast enhancement of the mass.
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Figure 1: (a) Axial non-enhanced CT scan of the abdomen showing a well defined hypodense mass at the left hypchondrium, interposed between left liver lobe, left hemidiaphragm and stomach. (b) Contrast enhanced CT scan showing heterogeneous contrast enhancement of the mass.

Mentions: A 46-year-old married Saudi woman presented at a primary health care center with left upper abdominal pain, with no other associated symptoms. Her medical history was not remarkable. Based on the history and clinical examination, she was treated as gastritis. Five months later, she presented to the surgery clinic because of increased abdominal pain with no response to medication; her physical examination showed fullness of the left upper abdomen. Her routine laboratory investigation as well as chest and abdominal x-rays were not remarkable. Ultrasound of the abdomen showed a solid mass at the left hypochondrium separated from the spleen and just below the left hemidiaphragm. Computed Tomography (CT) scan of the abdomen (Figure 1) showed encapsulated hypodense mass at the left upper abdomen which was interposed but clearly separated from left liver lobe, spleen, stomach and left hemidiaphragm. Post intravenous contrast CT scan showed heterogeneous enhancement of the mass. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the abdomen (Figure 2) confirmed the location of the mass and attachment to the inner aspect of the anterior abdominal wall but separated from internal abdominal organs. The mass was isosignal intensity to muscles in T1- weighted images and heterogeneous hyperintense signal in T2 weighted images. In post gadolinium T1 weighted images, the mass showed intense contrast enhancement.


Primary synovial sarcoma of the abdominal wall: a case report and review of the literature.

Saif AH - J Family Community Med (2008)

(a) Axial non-enhanced CT scan of the abdomen showing a well defined hypodense mass at the left hypchondrium, interposed between left liver lobe, left hemidiaphragm and stomach. (b) Contrast enhanced CT scan showing heterogeneous contrast enhancement of the mass.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3377125&req=5

Figure 1: (a) Axial non-enhanced CT scan of the abdomen showing a well defined hypodense mass at the left hypchondrium, interposed between left liver lobe, left hemidiaphragm and stomach. (b) Contrast enhanced CT scan showing heterogeneous contrast enhancement of the mass.
Mentions: A 46-year-old married Saudi woman presented at a primary health care center with left upper abdominal pain, with no other associated symptoms. Her medical history was not remarkable. Based on the history and clinical examination, she was treated as gastritis. Five months later, she presented to the surgery clinic because of increased abdominal pain with no response to medication; her physical examination showed fullness of the left upper abdomen. Her routine laboratory investigation as well as chest and abdominal x-rays were not remarkable. Ultrasound of the abdomen showed a solid mass at the left hypochondrium separated from the spleen and just below the left hemidiaphragm. Computed Tomography (CT) scan of the abdomen (Figure 1) showed encapsulated hypodense mass at the left upper abdomen which was interposed but clearly separated from left liver lobe, spleen, stomach and left hemidiaphragm. Post intravenous contrast CT scan showed heterogeneous enhancement of the mass. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the abdomen (Figure 2) confirmed the location of the mass and attachment to the inner aspect of the anterior abdominal wall but separated from internal abdominal organs. The mass was isosignal intensity to muscles in T1- weighted images and heterogeneous hyperintense signal in T2 weighted images. In post gadolinium T1 weighted images, the mass showed intense contrast enhancement.

Bottom Line: Synovial sarcoma is a malignant mesenchymal neoplasm which commonly occurs in the extremities of adults, in close association with joint capsules, tendon sheaths, bursae and fascial structures.Only a few cases of synovial sarcoma occurring in the abdominal wall have been reported.A case of a primary synovial sarcoma arising from the anterior abdominal wall fascial aponeurosis is presented.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Radiology, King Fahd Hospital of the University, College of Medicine, King Faisal University, Dammam, Saudi Arabia.

ABSTRACT
Synovial sarcoma is a malignant mesenchymal neoplasm which commonly occurs in the extremities of adults, in close association with joint capsules, tendon sheaths, bursae and fascial structures. Only a few cases of synovial sarcoma occurring in the abdominal wall have been reported. A case of a primary synovial sarcoma arising from the anterior abdominal wall fascial aponeurosis is presented.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus