Limits...
Does academic performance in the premedical year predict the performance of the medical student in subsequent years?

Al-Mazrou AM - J Family Community Med (2008)

Bottom Line: Overall, 28 students (3.8%) dropped out, but there was a significantly greater frequency of dropping out in the Low GPA group (10/120; 8.3%) compared with the High GPA group (18/619; 2.9%: OR 3.035 [95% CI: 1.37, 6.75], P=0.01).Our results support the prerequisite of a minimum GPA in the premedical year before proceeding to the higher levels.The use of GPA in the premedical year for admission into medical colleges should help optimize the use of resources and reduce student wastage.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: King Saud University, King Fahd Medical City, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia.

ABSTRACT

Background: Student admission into the College of Medicine at King Saud University (KSU) is dependent on the achievement of a grade point average (GPA) of ≥3.5 /5 by the end of the premedical year. This study was undertaken to ascertain whether pre-selected medical students who achieve a relatively low GPA (≤3.75/5) in the premedical year are at risk of having academic difficulties in subsequent years.

Method: A cross-sectional study of all students admitted to the College of Medicine at KSU during 5 academic years (1994 to 1998) was conducted in 2004. The likelihood of completing the program by 2004 and the dropout frequency were compared in the two groups based on their GPA in the premedical year: High GPA (>3.75) and Low GPA (≤3.75).

Results: During the study period, 739 students were admitted to the college. Of these, 619 (84%) were in High GPA group, and 120 (16%) in the Low GPA group. Of the students with High GPA, 545 (88%) out of 619 graduated compared with 79 (66%) of 120 in the Low GPA group (OR 3.822 [95% CI: 2.44, 5.99]: P<0.0001). Overall, 28 students (3.8%) dropped out, but there was a significantly greater frequency of dropping out in the Low GPA group (10/120; 8.3%) compared with the High GPA group (18/619; 2.9%: OR 3.035 [95% CI: 1.37, 6.75], P=0.01).

Conclusion: Our results support the prerequisite of a minimum GPA in the premedical year before proceeding to the higher levels. The GPA of premedical year is a useful predictor of students who need close monitoring and academic support. The use of GPA in the premedical year for admission into medical colleges should help optimize the use of resources and reduce student wastage.

No MeSH data available.


Percent of class graduated by 2004
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3377026&req=5

Figure 1: Percent of class graduated by 2004

Mentions: The likelihood of graduating at the time of the study differed significantly between students whose GPA during the premedical year was high and those with a low GPA (p<0.0001). Of those with a high GPA, 545 of 619 (88%) had graduated, compared with 79 of 120 (66%) students with the Low GPA (OR 3.822 [95% CI: 2.44, 5.99]: p<0.0001; Table 2). The difference in the graduation rate between the two groups was quite marked in the last two matriculation years (1997 and 1998; Figure 1). At the time of the study (2004), only 25% of the low GPA group from the batch that enrolled in 1998 had graduated, compared with 74% of those in the high GPA group (OR 8.667 [95% CI: 3.19, 23.53]: p<0.0001; Table 2). The difference between the two groups persisted even after remaining in college for an extra year, as the cumulative graduation rate for the 1997 cohort was also significantly lower in the Low GPA group (59% vs. 91%, OR 6.883 [95% CI: 2.78,17.02]: p<0.0001).


Does academic performance in the premedical year predict the performance of the medical student in subsequent years?

Al-Mazrou AM - J Family Community Med (2008)

Percent of class graduated by 2004
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3377026&req=5

Figure 1: Percent of class graduated by 2004
Mentions: The likelihood of graduating at the time of the study differed significantly between students whose GPA during the premedical year was high and those with a low GPA (p<0.0001). Of those with a high GPA, 545 of 619 (88%) had graduated, compared with 79 of 120 (66%) students with the Low GPA (OR 3.822 [95% CI: 2.44, 5.99]: p<0.0001; Table 2). The difference in the graduation rate between the two groups was quite marked in the last two matriculation years (1997 and 1998; Figure 1). At the time of the study (2004), only 25% of the low GPA group from the batch that enrolled in 1998 had graduated, compared with 74% of those in the high GPA group (OR 8.667 [95% CI: 3.19, 23.53]: p<0.0001; Table 2). The difference between the two groups persisted even after remaining in college for an extra year, as the cumulative graduation rate for the 1997 cohort was also significantly lower in the Low GPA group (59% vs. 91%, OR 6.883 [95% CI: 2.78,17.02]: p<0.0001).

Bottom Line: Overall, 28 students (3.8%) dropped out, but there was a significantly greater frequency of dropping out in the Low GPA group (10/120; 8.3%) compared with the High GPA group (18/619; 2.9%: OR 3.035 [95% CI: 1.37, 6.75], P=0.01).Our results support the prerequisite of a minimum GPA in the premedical year before proceeding to the higher levels.The use of GPA in the premedical year for admission into medical colleges should help optimize the use of resources and reduce student wastage.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: King Saud University, King Fahd Medical City, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia.

ABSTRACT

Background: Student admission into the College of Medicine at King Saud University (KSU) is dependent on the achievement of a grade point average (GPA) of ≥3.5 /5 by the end of the premedical year. This study was undertaken to ascertain whether pre-selected medical students who achieve a relatively low GPA (≤3.75/5) in the premedical year are at risk of having academic difficulties in subsequent years.

Method: A cross-sectional study of all students admitted to the College of Medicine at KSU during 5 academic years (1994 to 1998) was conducted in 2004. The likelihood of completing the program by 2004 and the dropout frequency were compared in the two groups based on their GPA in the premedical year: High GPA (>3.75) and Low GPA (≤3.75).

Results: During the study period, 739 students were admitted to the college. Of these, 619 (84%) were in High GPA group, and 120 (16%) in the Low GPA group. Of the students with High GPA, 545 (88%) out of 619 graduated compared with 79 (66%) of 120 in the Low GPA group (OR 3.822 [95% CI: 2.44, 5.99]: P<0.0001). Overall, 28 students (3.8%) dropped out, but there was a significantly greater frequency of dropping out in the Low GPA group (10/120; 8.3%) compared with the High GPA group (18/619; 2.9%: OR 3.035 [95% CI: 1.37, 6.75], P=0.01).

Conclusion: Our results support the prerequisite of a minimum GPA in the premedical year before proceeding to the higher levels. The GPA of premedical year is a useful predictor of students who need close monitoring and academic support. The use of GPA in the premedical year for admission into medical colleges should help optimize the use of resources and reduce student wastage.

No MeSH data available.